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They say the devil is in the details, but so are the delights.  I often take photos without knowing what delightful details I will uncover.  Like the photo below . . .  what caught my attention was that it was the first ketch I’d seen in the boro in 2022.

When I looked closer, I saw it flew a French flag.  Unfortunately, I can’t make out the vessel name below; maybe you can.

Lion’s Paw looks to be a non-winter boat as well.  

Aluminum hull and red flag caught me here, and no, I don’t mean the tugboat, which is obviously Frances

Is this “flag” called a “red duster”?

I saw the name on AIS, but have forgotten it;  it started with an A and had an X, I recall.  I do know that it’s a Boreal 47 though. 

And on this gusty day last week, she appeared to share the wind with a local sail school boat, I believe. 

I’d taken the next photos earlier and couldn’t quite figure out why the tug–clearly Pelham-and the party boat were so close together.  My first thought was that Pelham was towing a party boat that had possibly broken down. However, there was no tow line.  

Later I thought these folks clustered on the bow of the party boat hardly looked like they were going fishing!

Have you figured it out?

Look closely at Pelham.

Nope!  That does not say Pelham.  I imagine I’m a good reader, given how much of it I do, but because I recognized the profile as that of Pelham, I never bothered to read the name boards, which clearly say . . .  Katrina.  It took me two and a half weeks to notice that.  OK, I know that spring gives everyone giddiness, but let’s settle down here.  My conclusion now is that Sound Bound Star was the camera crew boat and Pelham/Katrina, the talent.  Anyone know the project, the movie?

All photos, WVD, who’s likely to get even more giddy along with the rising temperatures. 

We alternate back to Albert Gayer (1897-1976) tomorrow, but to maintain connection with the contemporary sixth boro, especially in the cold, crisp January light, enjoy these five varied boats from this past week.  Name the one below?

Pelham, of course.  The mighty Pelham was launched in 1960, loa is 80.4′, and has 3000 hp.

Who was rotating Marjorie K?

On the bow was Miriam Moran, 1979, 99′ loa, and also 3000 hp.

Name that boat?

Harry Mcneal is a busy boat launched in 1965, 53.3 loa, and 800 hp.

Which boat is this crewman on the bow of?

It’s the robust Rae, launched 1952, 46′ loa, and packing 450 hp.

And this one?

It’s the unmistakable Charles James, which started as a GLDD tug in 1985, 77′ loa, and 2400 hp.

All photos and any errors, WVD;  numbers from tugboatinformation.com

More Albert Gayer tomorrow.

A quick post today, since I’ll spend most of the day without computer, signal, or free time.  The varied and unsettled weather of the recent weeks is evident here as well, the diverse days of summer.

Here are some of the usual workhorses or work oxen of the port.

Brendan Turecamo, 

Normandy, and

Evening Breeze and a couple Bouchard barges.  There must be a shortage of locations to stack the idle Bouchard fleet, still in limbo no matter what engrossing negotiation is happening behind closed doors in advance of July 23, according to this article. 

Continuing with this threat, there’s Normandy and Pelham,

Fells Point, 

Justine McAllister,

Marjorie McAllister with Bulkmaster

Sea Lion and a sailboat under sail, 

Brendan Turecamo

Kirby Moran and Miriam Moran, 

Miriam and a fishing skiff, 

and Kirby, James D., and Miriam, all Moran, and all following an incoming ship. 

More soon . . . WVD.

 

Evening twilight rarely finds me at the KVK.  I should go there more often.

That’s the 1960 Pelham, originally launched as Esso Pelham.

For a 60 year old machine, she still looks good.

Back before the Esso name was phased out in 1972, she must have been a formidable tugboat.

 

All photos, WVD.

It still says Eastern Star Dawn, but now it’s Toula!

She’s going to look great all buff and green.

Barry Silverton finally

has a lion on its stack!  All those birds?  It’s water teeming with the bunker, the bunker that recently drew a humpback into the Upper Bay.

Pelham, launched in 1960, is always a pleasant sight.  She has a list of previous names almost as long as my seasonal wish list this year.

Here she took a wake on the bow.

James William used the waters off the salt pile

as a turning basin.

And finally, after a long hiatus down south, CMT Pike has returned.  When i caught her, she was being pursued

by this container ship.

All photos, WVD.

Unrelated but of interest, below . . .

yes, Grain de Sail is a 72′ schooner coming into the sixth boro with a 50-ton cargo hold, some of it refrigerated, bringing in French wine.  She’ll set up a market in the Brooklyn Navy Yard for about a week.  Contact info and an e-shop can be found here, although you’ll have to use a machine translate if you’re not up to functionality in French.  

Grain de Sail is involved in triangular  trade, French wine to here and the Caribbean, and then Caribbean chocolate and other products to France . . . .  Something similar in sail freight  domestically has been done by Ceres and more recently by Apollonia.  The most recent international sailing cargo into the sixth boro that I know of was Black Seal, a three-masted schooner.

I’m always on the lookout for “first-timers” in the harbor, but I’m equally thrilled to see the “seldom-seen.”  I realize that some people might see these boats everyday. The “seldom-seen” relates to me.

This is true of Pelham.  The 1960 built is on her sixth name, if I count right.  She started out as Esso Pelham.  You’ll have to scroll, but here are a number of times I’ve posted photos of her, in and out of the water.

Evelyn Cutler, a 1973 build,  is a frequenter on this site.  When I first saw her, she was a Great Lakes Dock and Dredge boat called Melvin E. Lemmerhirt.

In the few months that this boat has been know as Mackenzie Rose, she appears to stay quite busy.  That’s a good thing.

Rae also fits into the rarely seen list, although maybe she was laid up and is now busy again.  Meeting her here is Normandy. Rae and Normandy were built in 1952  and 2007, respectively.

Philadelphia and

Jacksonville are both recent 4200 hp Vane boats.  Jacksonville, 2018, is one year newer than Philadelphia.

I first saw the 1981 Genesis Victory as Huron Service.  Periodically, some of the Genesis boats do make their way into Lake Huron and beyond.

As i said earlier, Mackenzie Rose is quite busy.  Does anyone know her namesake?  I don’t.

Frederick E. Bouchard is the second boat to carry that name.  She was built in 2016 and operates with 6140 hp, but

these days she looks quite light and her exposed waterline somewhat rusty.

Barney Turecamo, the fourth (?) boat to carry that name, brings 5100 hp to the job.  When she was built in 1995, she had a different upper wheelhouse.

All photos, WVD, and taken in the past month.

 

Let’s do the numbers again.  No, Pelham is NOT becoming a tugantine in the tradition of Norfolk Rebel.  Seeing Pelham out of the water really reveals a beauty I hadn’t noticed before.

OK, numbers, built in 1960 and rated at 3000 hp.

Atlantic Coast, 2007 and 3000hp.

 

Genesis Vision, 1981 and 3000hp.

Margaret Moran, 1979 and 3000hp.

(l to r) Fort Schuyler 2015 and 3000hp, Patuxent 2008 and 4200, and Kings Point 2014 and 3000.

Note the difference in “neck” length leading to the upper wheelhouse;  that hints at the difference in engines.

Resolve, 2007 and 9280hp.

Brownsville, 2008 and 12,000hp.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is playing in the Great Lakes by this time.

Recognize the tugboat below?  Answer follows.

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David McAllister, photo from 2013, has recently changed hands and is currently undergoing “re-power and life extension” as Tradewinds Towing Hannah.

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Draco, photo below taken in 2007, shows the vessel that began life in 1951 as Esso Tug No. 12.  I caught her in the sixth boro as Co here (scroll) back in 2009.

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Pleon, built in 1953, has appeared on this blog several times recently.

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Canal Deluge, shown here in Fournier Towing and Ship Services colors, has since been sold to Trinidad, where she is (somewhat appropriately) know as Boston Lady.

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And finally, originally a steam tug built in the mid-1920s to assist ships and break ice on the Delaware river, the 125′ John Wanamaker claimed the title of the last steam tug operating commercially in the US, but after several stints as a restaurant boat, she was cut up in New Bedford sometime around 2007.   Anyone have photos of her last days or her last decades as a restaurant in at least three different New England locations?  For a great story about her–and many other boats– read Jim Sharp’s With Reckless Abandon It seems that Jim has owned at least half the historic vessels on the East coast at one time or other. His Sail, Power, & Steam Museum will reopen in the spring.

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Again, thanks to JG, these photos from the near but irretrievable past.

Oh, and that mystery tug at the top, she’s of course Pelham, seen in this post (scroll) and many others here.

If you have a lot of free time, you can trace this back to the first installment.

These photos are all from the past week, starting out with Bouchard Boys, 1975.

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Pelham, 1960.  Behind her is USNS Red Cloud.

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Barney Turecamo (1995) and

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Scott Turecamo (1998).

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Eric R. Thornton (1960)

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Jill Reinauer (1967) and Dace Reinauer (1968) with RTC 61.

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Add Stephen-Scott (1967) and Ruth M. Reinauer (2008) pushing RTC 102.

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Margaret Moran (1979) starting a backing-down of Heina with

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James D. Moran (2015).  More on this backing down later this week.

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Captain D (1974) with CVA-604.

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Meagan Ann (1975)

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Houma (1970).

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Frances (1957) and I think I know the crewman forward of the house.

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And finally, I put this photo here because of a boat in the background.  Is that Kristy Ann Reinauer (1962)?  I thought she was scrapped half a year ago already.  Hmm.

Other boats here are L. to r.) Realist, Kristy Ann, Hubert Bays, Long Splice, Samantha Miller, Stephen B, and Hunt Girls, which has been in the yard there for (?) two years now?

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Yesterday’s post led with Jared S aka Cheyenne II, and so I’m grateful to Jason LaDue for sending along a photo he took before she sank into the Genesee River, where she still lies.

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This next photo was taken by Renee Lutz Stanley, recently, as Pelham assisted the dead but lively Frying Pan to Caddell for some work.  This is my first time seeing Frying Pan away from her berth at Pier 66.  Previous posts with Frying Pan include this, this, and notably this;  in the fifth photo of the “notable” third link there, you get a little background on Frying Pan and its name, as well as see the location the lightship MIGHT have ended up at as mainstay of a North Carolina maritime museum, which would have put it much closer to Frying Pan Shoal.  Here and here are some recent posts with Pelham.

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The next five photos I took on a recent gallivant down east.  Little Toot, who works at Washburn & Doughty ( W & D) of East Boothbay, ME, appears to be a pristine-looking 1953 product of Roamer Boat company of Holland, MI.

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On the opposite side of the big blue shed at W & D is one of East Boothbay’s newest almost completed tugs, likely the JRT Moran.

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I saw Dorothy L (1965) twice while I was in the area inland from Monhegan, this time and once later but at about 0600 h and the light and motion of my ride didn’t lend itself to a good photo.

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And here are some from the sixth boro, Haggerty Girls in the notch of RTC 107, and

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And finally, a veteran . ..  it’s Freddie K Miller inside the water and

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out.  For a wide range of photos of this boat’s life, click here.

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Thanks to Jason and Renee for use of their photos.  For more of Renee’s photos of the Frying Pan move, click here.

And here, verbatim, is my call for collaboration for November posts.  Thanks to those of you who have already responded.

“And if you’re interested in collaboration, I invite your help for November posts.  All month long I hope to feature different ports–harbors–waterways and their workboats, which means not only towing vessels, but also ferries, fish boats, maintenance vessels, even yachts with professional crews.  I’ve been traveling a lot the past few months and have a fairly large backlog of boats from ports–harbors–waterways mostly in New England.  But as a social medium, this blog thrives on collaboration, so no matter which waters are near you,  I’m inviting you to send along photos of workboats from ports I might not get to.  I’d need at least three interesting photos to warrant a focus on a port.  Here are examples I’ve already done that illustrate what I’m thinking to do.”

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