You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Genesis Victory’ tag.

This title goes back more than 10 years.  But I got some congested photos recently, so I dredge up an old title.  Count the boats of all sizes here.  Of course, foreshortening makes them seem much closer to each other than they really are.  I count at least 12 vessels on the photo below, including some I had not noticed when I took it.

There are five here, and maybe two miles of separation between the two container ships.

Three operations were happening simultaneously in this stretch of the channel, and all were either stemming or moving very slowly.

Again, there’s lots of foreshortening here.

It may be exhilarating to get this close to a large ship, but if your engine stalls . . .  stuff’ll happen really fast.

Here’s a different sort of “traffic” photo from august 31, 2008 . . . exactly 12 years ago.  And it gives me an idea for a post.  By the way, left to right, can you name at least half of the 12 boats at least partly visible here?

All photos, WVD.

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I’m always on the lookout for “first-timers” in the harbor, but I’m equally thrilled to see the “seldom-seen.”  I realize that some people might see these boats everyday. The “seldom-seen” relates to me.

This is true of Pelham.  The 1960 built is on her sixth name, if I count right.  She started out as Esso Pelham.  You’ll have to scroll, but here are a number of times I’ve posted photos of her, in and out of the water.

Evelyn Cutler, a 1973 build,  is a frequenter on this site.  When I first saw her, she was a Great Lakes Dock and Dredge boat called Melvin E. Lemmerhirt.

In the few months that this boat has been know as Mackenzie Rose, she appears to stay quite busy.  That’s a good thing.

Rae also fits into the rarely seen list, although maybe she was laid up and is now busy again.  Meeting her here is Normandy. Rae and Normandy were built in 1952  and 2007, respectively.

Philadelphia and

Jacksonville are both recent 4200 hp Vane boats.  Jacksonville, 2018, is one year newer than Philadelphia.

I first saw the 1981 Genesis Victory as Huron Service.  Periodically, some of the Genesis boats do make their way into Lake Huron and beyond.

As i said earlier, Mackenzie Rose is quite busy.  Does anyone know her namesake?  I don’t.

Frederick E. Bouchard is the second boat to carry that name.  She was built in 2016 and operates with 6140 hp, but

these days she looks quite light and her exposed waterline somewhat rusty.

Barney Turecamo, the fourth (?) boat to carry that name, brings 5100 hp to the job.  When she was built in 1995, she had a different upper wheelhouse.

All photos, WVD, and taken in the past month.

 

As you know from some earlier posts, those red morning skies . .  they mark my favorite times.

Here Coral Coast with Cement Transporter 5300 has just departed the dock with Ruby M‘s assistance.

 

Soon afterward, Sapphire Coast arrived with Cement Transporter 1801, and assisted

by Stephen Dann.

Later in the morning, Sarah Ann pushes scow Michelle D.

Durham moves deck barge Arlene, bound for some work in the East River.

Harry McNeal returns with barge 1962 to IMTT to continue the job there.

Nicole Leigh stands by with RTC 135.

Pathfinder delivers empty garbage containers from the railhead to the marine transfer station.

Charles D. returns from Earle.

And finally, departing IMTT,

Genesis Victory gets an assist from Normandy.

All photos, WVD.

Nathan G comes toward the Narrows with

a max loaded scow.

B. Franklin Reinauer heads into the Kills

 

Hunting Creek heads west and

Jacksonville, east.  By the way, what is that blue flag halfway up the mast above?

N is for Nicholas Vinik coming by to

to assist Genesis Victory with GM 6506 out of IMTT.

And we’ll hold it up here.

Remember my virtual tour.  It’s 45-50 minutes, no advertisements, and you get to ask questions.

You’ll travel through time and space Tuesday, May 26, and if you can’t listen in then, it’ll be archives so you can listen whenever you feel like.  Book it, please.  It’ll answer every question except . . . where Sal was born.

 

It’s hard to believe that this title has come up 286 times before today, but here they all are.  And yet, I’m starting out with a photo of Ellen McAllister, who herself has appeared here hundreds of times, but never quite like this, heading into the  dawn and about to pass an unidentifiable Vane tugboat.

Ditto Pegasus, passing between a Bouchard tug to the left and some Centerline boats to the right, and below that ONE container on the bridge and the Fedex plane in the sky.

Double Skin 57 and Long Island, previously Peter F. Gellatly,  moves a barge past IMTT, where some Reinauer boats–RTC 103 and Morgan— are taking on product.

Potomac gets an assist from Fort Schuyler.

Ava M. McAllister passes UACC Ibn Al Haitham, where Genesis Victory is lightering and Liz Vinik assisting.

On another morning, Fort Schuyler heads for the Upper Bay, and that looks like Kristin Poling in the distance to the left.

And where Meredith C. Reinauer is lightering Marvin Faith, Bouchard’s Linda Lee, Ellen S., and Evening Breeze look on.

All photos recently by WVD,who had to look up the namesake of the UACC crude carrier.   He turns out to be a Basra-born scientist from a millenium (!!) ago.  That link is worth a read.

 

The 1963 Patricia is always a head-turner, and she was especially so the other morning.  The longer I look at the photo below, the more I imagine it framed.

Her throaty sound catches the ear as well.  Am I mistaken or has that color scheme changed a bit?

Carolina Coast makes the sugar run all year round, but that billowing spinnaker clearly states the season.

 

Nathan G has been spending a lot of time of late on runs outside the VZ Bridge.

 

Here, a busy distant Bayonne port as seen from Owls Head, is Genesis Victory with barge GM 6506 and a very busy background, as

she gets assisted into a lightening position by Pegasus.

James D. Moran escorts a quite empty Leo C.

toward Port Elizabeth.

Discovery Coast here takes on Edwin A. Poling.  It amazes me that the sylvan shoreline beyond the unit is actually in New York City and masks a dense residential area.

Moments before she was headed in from an anchorage area.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who favors another shot of Patricia.

 

For folks who’ve been watching sixth boro traffic much longer than I have, Lyman must conjure up a sense of ressursction that I don’t have whenever I see the profile.  Then called Crusader, she was tripped by her barge and sank just over 30 years ago.  I’ve almost always seen her with

barge Sea Shuttle, towing sections of subs. For a spectacular view of this tow in the East River seven years ago click here.

Rockefeller University’s River Campus makes an unusual backdrop here for Foxy 3.   See the support structure for the campus being lifted from the River here.

Treasure Coast . . .  offhand, do you know the build date?

Carolina Coast,

with sugar barge Jonathan, which you’ve seen some years ago here as Falcon.

Pearl Coast with a cement barge off the Narrows remaking the tow to enter the Upper Bay.

In the rain, it’s Genesis Victory and Scott Turecamo, and their respective barges.

Franklin Reinauer heads out with RTC 28, and heading in it’s

Kimberly Poling with Noelle Cutler.

And let’s stop here with JRT assisting Cosco Faith.

All photos recently by Will Van Dorp, who’s been inland for a week now and sees Shelia Bordelon on AIS at the Stapleton pier this morning.   Anyone get photos?

 

 

 

Take a camera and an hour and a half,

hang out at some point along the KVK,

if it’s cold then bring some hand and boot warmers and a thermos with hot tea,

monitor the scan function on your hand held,

and wait.  Soon there’ll be some traffic. Snap away.

Winter is a better time than summer for photos because of the clarity

of the air.

A wise man once told me that New Yorkers don’t really have to travel, because the world

travels past them.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

When the cold makes it less pleasant outside,  it’s heating season in the sixth boro and region far and wide.  I’m not sure all these units are moving heating oil, but they are all moving fuel of one sort or another.

Can it be that Crystal Cutler has been working here for almost 8 years now?!!  Here was my first time seeing her back in 2010.

 

Here’s a larger unit for a different niche than Crystal.

When I was first paying attention, the tug here was called Huron Service.

She’s been Genesis Victory for about five years now.

 

Diane B does some creek work once she leaves the main channels.  Here’s an article I did on Diane B and John Blanche some years back already.

 

All photos and any errors here by Will Van Dorp, who wishes anyone out there to be safe.

 

Genesis Energy likely has more boats on inland waters than offshore.  I saw the first two boats in today’s post first when they had Hornbeck livery.

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Genesis Victory used to be Huron Service  (and further regression is found at that link) and

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Genesis Liberty used to be

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Liberty Service, and here’s more regressions on both.

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A lot of boats in the harbor have worn other names previously.  It’s true of Mary Alice.  

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Here’s her history, thanks to Birk’s gold mine site.

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Jonathan C, however, is brand spanking new, having been christened less than a year ago.  But starting from week one, maintenance needs doing.

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Ditto Janet D, she’s less than two years old.

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And here is Labrador Sea as I saw her last week, but when I first photographed her she looked

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like this. And although I have none of my own photos, here’s what I first saw.

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I hope you enjoyed this look backwards.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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