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All these photos were taken last weekend in the port of Rotterdam by Jan Oosterboer and used via Fred Trooster.  Notice their size:

MSC Regulus . . . 1200′ x 156”

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Fairplay 27 shifting MSC Regulus

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Margrethe Maersk, here tailed by SD Shark, at 1309′ x 196′   . . .

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a Maersk Triple E class container vessel, capacity of 18,000 teu’s, and

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in service about three months now.

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CSCL Atlantic Ocean, 19,100 teu capacity, 1312′ x 190,’ and on her maiden voyage from Asia.

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And finally, Berge Stahl, nearly 30 years afloat, 364, 767 tones DWT.  Her dimensions are only 1122′ loa and 206′ beam.

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And why are ships getting bigger, other than because they can, and the population is growing?  Well, we need more stuff.  Compare these family photos of household and possessions.

Many thanks to Jan and Fred for these photos.

I’d love to know more about this launch . . . in terms of engine and performance.

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“Launch” is what the pilot service calls this.

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And this is the PSV (pilot station vessel) Polaris, which has operated off the Port of rotterdam for three plus years now.

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For some great photos of pilot vessels all over the world, check this site by Mirjam Terpstra.  Click here for more of her photos before Polaris was in service.

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Many thanks to Freek Koning via Fred Trooster for these photos. Freek, a few years ago, asked me to try to discover the disposition of this former Royal Dutch Navy tugboat.  My letters to various addresses in the USCG in reference to the lost tug went unanswered.

Deer do it.  So do . . . whales, dragonflies, eels, and more .  But the annual mermaid migration, I find,  is as magical to me as it is to the young girl watching for the first time, taking photos, and one of the princesses of the sea came over and blew some sparkles all around.

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When the mermaids migrate in, they bring entourages of music,

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like samba, and

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loud marching bands and

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shrillest of pipes.

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I noticed that the troubled vessel Grey Shark left town during the parade;  I turned and looked out at the drizzly sea behind me, but preferred to take a closeup of the dogfish that stuck around.

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The mermaids feted some old-timers like daddy-oh!

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They brought in some commercial land folk with adaptations.

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They even engaged in some unexpected commerce.

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They commandeered a “fruits of the sea” sacrifice bearer.

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Of course, there were some humans who felt they needed to “administer” the  event, BUT

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otherwise, the sea creatures just emerged, checked their makeup, and

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and exuded their legendary grace

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and cheeriness.

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much to the delight of all the photographers or just admirers.

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They stayed the day, rainy as it was, before taking flight until the next time.

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I’ve missed only twice in the past decade:  here are posts from 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010  . . . and you can find more just by scrolling way down to the archives  . . . lower left and searching June each year around the 21st.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

About lobster migrations, click here.

And about animals in parades, the NYTimes this morning had this great story on a swimming/patrolling beast from its Brazilian bureau chief  . . .

 

 

 

Here are some more Harley tugs, thanks to Kyle, who sent along all the photos AND text for this post also.

MILLENNIUM FALCON built by  the Marine Construction & Design Co (MARCO) at Seattle, at used for long-haul fuel barge tows on the Pacific coast. OLYMPIC SCOUT was built in 1976 in-house for Pacific Towboat & Salvage Co of Long Beach, CA as AVENGER. In 2004 she was purchased by American Navigation Co and renamed PACIFIC MARINER, then sold to Harley in 2007.

0aaaah9MILLENNIUM FALCON & OLYMPIC SCOUT

KESTREL was built in 2012 by Halimar Shipyard and is based off of the design of Vane Brothers Sassafras-class tugs. She is currently used for operation in Southeast Alaska.

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JAMES T QUIGG was built in 1971 by Houma Welders as BRETT CANDIES for the Otto Candies  company. Later owned by White Horse Marine of Norfolk as PEGASUS, Portland Tugboat & Shipdocking of Portland, ME as FOURNIER BOYS and American Workboats of Honolulu as AMERICAN CHALLENGER. Purchased by Harley in 2001.

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MICHELLE SLOAN is Harley’s newest delivery, built by Diversified Marine of Portland, OR. Based on a design by Robert Allan Ltd of Vancouver, BC, she is used for shiphandling around LA.

 

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Another shot of MILLENNIUM STAR

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ALYSSA ANN, built in-house in 1966 as J.V. ALARIO for Nolty J. Theriot Offshore and participated in the North Sea oil boom in the late 70’s/early 80’s, pictured with ERNEST CAMPBELL, built in 1969 by Southern Shipbuilding as GATCO FLORIDA for Gulf Atlantic Transport Co of Miami. Later owned by Mobile Bay Towing as MOBILE PRIDE. In the background, the brick clocktower belongs to the headquarters building of Starbucks. You might have heard of them… The building was built in 1912 as the West Coast catalog center for Sears Roebuck.

0aaaah15ALYSSA ANN & ERNEST CAMPBELL

EMERY ZIDELL is a newly-delivered ATB unit, built by Conrad Shipyard and partnered with the barge DR ROBERT J BEALL.

0aaaah16EMERY ZIDELL

Another shot of LISSY TOO, this one compliments of Seth Tane.

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TIM QUIGG, pictured in the Port of LA, is a predecessor to MICHELLE SLOAN, built by Diversified Marine in 2004 and also used in the Port of LA/Long Beach.”

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And who is this Harley?  Click here.

As to the small sixth boro contingent of Harley, I miss the bow puddings I first associated them with more than half a decade ago.

Kyle, again . . . many thanks.

Unrelated:  my mission today is to see if the mermaid parade brings any tugboats;  of course, I’m likely to get distracted.  See you there, maybe?

This post is a serious whatzit, an attempt to find out more about a tugboat in the photo below.  I use the photo courtesy of the Erie Canal Museum in Syracuse.  If you have not been reading this blog very long, I spent five months last year working on a historic tug on the Erie Canal.  Type erie canal into the search window and you’ll find hundreds of photos from then.

The photo appears to be taken in Rochester, nicknamed the Flower City, although as a kid, I had thought it was the “flour” city.   I guess it’s both.

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Anyone know more about this tugboat?

So I went to the Monroe County Library image search site here and used the search term “boat,” and found a lot of fascinating stuff–like excursion boats now derelict, steam ferries, a seized bootlegger boat, yachts from a century ago, docks, and canal barges.  To whet your appetite, I include a few here.  Go to the website to read captions on reverse.  I know nothing more about Lorraine or Cowles Towing Line, but the “barge” it’s towing is currently known as Day-Peckinpaugh, which will gain some attention later this summer.  Photo is said taken on June 13, 1921.

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Taken on November 22, 1921, this is steam barge Albany, which raises more questions.  Go to the MCLS site for the info on reverse of the print.

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The photo below is also said taken on November 22, 1921 by Albert R. Stone.    I’d like to know what the name of the darker tug alongside the starboard side of the end of this string of barges.  So maybe these are the grain barges that broke away?

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Again, a Stone photo, date uncertain, showing tug Henry Koerber Jr.

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One more Stone photo, said 1918 . . . tug  Laura Grace aground off Grand View Beach . . . Greece?

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And all of this returns us to the mystery photo from the Erie Canal Museum . . . my guess is that it was taken by Albert R. Stone, but it was not included in the Monroe County local history photo database.  Anyone help?

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Many thanks to the Erie Canal Museum for passing this photo along.

If your appetite is really whetted, enjoy these unrelated old and new photos of Urger–ex-State of NY DPW tug–and Seneca, currently a NYS Canal tug but previously a US Navy tug.

Click here for an index of previous “whatzit” posts.

Here’s a photo taken from Pegasus in July 2012, showing the entire Harley fleet in New York that night.  HMS Justice has been around since also, although I’ve not seen her in a while.

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July 4, 2012, awaiting the fireworks

Kyle Stubbs recently sent along a set of Harley photos, which are divided into two groups here.  Take it away, Kyle.  All photos were taken in Seattle unless stated otherwise.

EAGLE was built in 1979 by Modern Marine Power as DALLAS J ADAMS for Doucet & Adams on the Gulf Coast. In 2000 she was purchased by Harley and brought west.

0aaaah3EAGLE

Z-FIVE, pictured underway on LA Harbor, was built in 1999 by MARCO for Tugz International of Ft. Lauderdale, and eventually sold to Harley where she is used on the California coast along with her sisters Z-THREE and Z-FOUR.

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The photo of BOB FRANCO and ROBERT FRANCO shows both soon after delivery in 2013, the former from Diversified Marine of Portland, OR and the latter from Nichols Brothers of Freeland, WA.

0aaaah4BOB FRANCO & ROBERT FRANCO

LISSY TOO, pictured passing Longview, WA on the Columbia, was built in 1974 by Sneed Shipbuilding of Orange, TX as MISS SAN. She later wore the names CREOLE SAN and RENE before being purchased by Harley.

0aaaah5LISSY TOO

LELA JOY was built in 1970 by Halter Marine Services as MODOC. She was acquired by Harley in 1972 and renamed WILLAMETTE CHAMPION before being sold and renamed JANET R. In 1993 she was reacquired by Harley and gained her current name.

0aaaah6LELA JOY

GRIZZLY, pictured at the Port of Tacoma, was built in 1943 by Equitable Equipment as the US Army freighter F 18. She was later converted to a pusher tug by Smith Tug & Barge for use on the Columbia. After changing hands several times, she was purchased by Harley in 2007.

0aaaah7GRIZZLY

BRIAN S, built by Main Iron Works in 1963 is a long-time Northwest tug. After being operated on the Gulf coast from 63 to 74 by Gulf Mississippi Marina and then Guidry Brothers, she was brought to the west coast by Foss Maritime and renamed MARGARET FOSS. In 1989 she was purchased by Oregon-based Sause Brothers and renamed GO-GETTER. She spends most of her time now based in Port Angles.

0aaaah8BRIAN S

HUNTER D was built in 1970 by Albina Engine & Machina Works of Portland, OR as MALANAE for Hawaiian Tug & Barge, and acquired by Harley in 2002.” In the background is ALYSSA ANN, which we get a better photo of soon.

0aaaah11HUNTER D

Again, all photos here come compliments of Kyle Stubbs.  Part b  . .  soon.

For an index of all previous “thanks to” posts, click here.

 

As an example of how large this watershed is, the photo below was taken on June 2; at that point Vikingbank was inbound from Sweden upbound near the intersection of the St. Lawrence and Lake Ontario and headed for Duluth.  It arrived in Duluth to load grain only June 15!!   Click here for a site that demonstrates just how huge this watershed is.

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Click here, here, and here for some posts I did between Lake Ontario and Montreal, location of the retired LaChine Canal, where the retired Daniel McAllister is on display.  To the right in the photo are the elevators that dominate the old city waterside.

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South of the elevators these vessels were docked.  I know . . . it’s a poor quality photo, but I’m hoping someone can identify the sailing vessel to the left.

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Looking downbound from Parc de la Cité du Havre, there’s a very Dutch-looking tug yacht Theodore and Turkey-built Algonova.

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Also, this container assemblage in the park is the jumping off point for some

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beefy looking “get wet” boats.  “Saute moutons” literally means “jump sheep.”

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Farther downriver in Trois-Rivieres, Chaulk Determination appears to be in limbo after a serious incident half a year ago.

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And in the interest of time, let’s leave the St. Lawrence here for now.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Let me share photos from three Eagle visits in the past decade.  Here she arrives off the east end of Wall Street.

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2005, I believe.

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Note the teams hauling on the docking line.

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docking at then Pier 17

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Charles D. McAllister tucks her in to the dock.

Here she lies at anchor in 2011 with

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crew in the rigging doing

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work.

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departure 2011

And here are details I focused on earlier this week.

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To reiterate what I wrote yesterday,read Captain Gordon McGowan’s The Skipper and the Eagle.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

For a similar set of closeups of another German-built sail training vessel–Dewaruci–click here.

Click here to scan the many posts with KVK in the title.  Here’s a new one inspired by arrivals that had many folks, aship and ashore, paying attention.

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Wavertree is suddenly and lavishly being regaled with sights of 21st century merchant vessels

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Products tanker Polaris, delivered 129 years after Wavertree

and crew from all over the world are paying attention.

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And a mile farther east, at the old gypsum dock, tugboats like Laura K Moran and

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Stephen B pass.

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If you want to read a good book about when and how the US took possession of Eagle, read Captain Gordon McGowan’s The Skipper and the Eagle. The book has an introduction by Peter Stanford, a foreword by Alan Villiers, and the journey starts out from NYC’s own LaGuardia.

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I have many more closeups of the barque;  maybe

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I’ll put them up if I get encouragement.  A previous posts featuring Eagle can be seen here.   For a comparison of steering apparatus on Eagle with other vessels, click here.

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Here Swallow Ace crew check out an Eagle.

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The long street on the landside of this portion of the Kills is called Richmond Terrace.  For photos and explanation of what is and used to be there, click here and here,  from the ever fascinating forgotten-by.com.  Click here to see an image of a square rigger bulk carrier docked in front of Windsor Plaster Mills, now an Eastern Salt facility, in its heyday.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Put Cornell into the search box and you’ll see how many posts I’ve done on this 1950 Long Island-built vessel.  I even wrote an article for Professional Mariner.  Click here for more info on Cornell.

But this post just raises a question . . .if the sunrises over a calm East River and no one is there to see it,

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is it still pretty?

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I think so.  Photos taken at 0630 this morning by Will Van Dorp.

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