You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘tugster’ tag.

It’s been a while since I used this title.  I went there yesterday morning to have a long walk but beat the impending heat.  Besides, a setting moon over Staten Island beckoned, and I had to be up early anyhow to milk the cows . . ..

Well, that was a kink in the time continuum.  But Eric McAllister had work,

as did Sarah D . . .

and Fidelio had arrived from who-knows-where over the horizon, a string of US ports but the voyage beginning in Lázaro Cárdenas, Mexico.

 

 

 

For Sarah D, once she’s past High Power, likely she’ll go to Inwood and then upriver.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

It’s been a few months since I last used this title here . . .

USNS Gilliland has been alongside the Bayonne dry dock for a few weeks now, and the other day

I had the chance to see her alongside a bit closer.

This Danish hull has been in the water most of the time since 1972.

MLB 47279, based in Montauk, is a whole different type of government boat.

This source says 117 of these were built, introduced between 1997 and 2003, and

all remain in service.  To see these boats in action, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I think of ROROs like Dignity Ace as being fairly large, but this juxtaposition made me re-evaluate.

So let’s let the tape tell its tale:  three vessels here are (l to r) Anthem of the Seas, YM Utmost, and Dignity Ace with respect to their length and breadth; and I realize that the photo does nothing to show loa.  It comes out as 1141′ x 162′  v.  1099′ x 140′ v.  656′ x 106.’

The two Vane tugs are 90′ x 32,’  although I know it’s Fort McHenry alongside Anthem and cannot identify the tug alongside Dignity.

I’m guessing the fishing boat anchored here is about 20′ and

Franklin Reinauer is 81′ x 27.9 . . . .

And since we’re doing numbers . . . from the “globe” atop the “sky arm” to the water . . . that’s 300.’

That puts some perspective on scale of some sixth boro traffic.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Given the location of the sixth boro, it’s not surprising how often “atlantic” appears in post titles.

It’s not quite an oxymoron, but those two words juxtaposed certainly seem odd unless you look at the context . . .    more on this at the end of the post.  But olive?  And I’m thinking the branch may be more needed now than the fruit . . .  Atlantic Olive Branch . . . on AIS?

For now, in this bright and rich morning light, let’s arc around the MR tanker and her escort . . .  Note the ship’s crew checking out the gangway . . .

as the ship passes what could be the village of St. George . . . and that link tells me I need to visit Fort Hill in the background there.

Escorting the tanker into the dock more or less straight ahead are Miriam Moran and Brendan Turecamo.

For all the apparent “non-sixth boro ness” of the tanker, the contact info for Diamond S is Connecticut . . .

Here’s looking back toward the POV of the first photo.

Happy Friday . .  .  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Really random means just that . . . so that’s start with this one, Tutahaco, YTM-524, which has recently been hauled out of the water  between Daytona and St Augustine.   Michael Schmidt took these photos back last winter.

She worked for a time in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

The next two photos come from Allan and Sally Seymour, whose twotugstravelin’ blog was mentioned in yesterday’s post.  Kathleen Turecamo (1968) is a staple these days in the Port of Albany.

A bit farther north on the Hudson in Troy is the footprint of NYS Marine Highway Transportation Company.  Pictured here from r to l are Margot, Benjamin Elliot, and Betty D; built in 1958, 1960, and 1980, respectively.

The next photo is from Kyle Stubbs, who writes “the original JOVI is still around. The simple answer is yes, and she’s quite a ways from the Sixth Boro, now taking up residence in San Diego in the service of Pacific Tugboat Service as the JAG. I’ve attached an image of her I took this past September.”  Kyle sent the photo along in response to a question about Lil Rip I’d posted here some years back.

George Schneider picks up the Lil Rip‘s origins question here and sends along his own photo of Jag, to wit ”

I was very suspicious of the story she was made from part of a Liberty Ship, since hacking up something like that just to make a push boat didn’t make sense.  But somewhere along the lines, I realized the LIL RIP was registered at 54 feet long.  I found a Liberty Ship was 57 feet wide, so that’s perfect, considering they had to cut away some of the “stern” for the propellers, so the registered length would be a few feet shorter than overall.

That gave me a reason to believe the reputed origins of the boat were true.  It makes even more sense, because if you realize the scrap yards generally had no drydocks or slipways, they’d cut a ship like that down to the tank tops while it was afloat, then somehow had to dispose of the double bottoms.  Sometimes they just took them out and sank them since it took so much extra effort to clean and cut them up.  But in New Jersey, whose coastline is inland, they probably had to cut them apart and lift them ashore, and voile!  What a perfect hull to build a pushboat on!

So I’m wondering if anybody has added more to the comments on that day’s page.  If anybody has ever seen her “on the hard,” they might have measured her across the deck, and if that measures a perfect 57 feet in length, I’d say that’s pretty close to proof.  I looked up the liberty ships sold for scrap 1961-64, and none were scrapped in Elizabeth NJ, nor were any scrapped by her owner.

But several deceptive things are at play here:  1)  A ship sold for scrap was not legally reused for anything, so the title to something made out of the pieces couldn’t reflect the original vessel.   2)  If the ship wasn’t sold for scrap, was “Sold for Non-Transportation Use’ which was also sometimes authorized, she might not have been included in the list of vessels scrapped, and 3)  Vessels were often bought by distant companies, then found the vessel couldn’t practically be towed to their scrapyard, were sold or contracted to other companies for scrapping.

As for the question of the original JOVI (283905), she kept her name long after the JOVI II, working for various East Coast companies, but then made her way out here to San Diego, where she now works.  She has worked as TUG JAG, then KODAK, and now simply JAG.  I’ve attached, unfortunately, the best and only digital photo I’ve taken of her.  You can reproduce this any way you’d like.”

Now I’m wondering about Logan and Mate.  Logan shows in the NOAA registry as built in 1974 and formerly called Kodak, Jag, and Guppy.   Mate doesn’t show.

Sarah D (1975) worked for White Stack, Turecamo, and Moran (each bought out the previous company) before coming to NYS Marine Highway.

And finally, once again out and about in the sixth boro, it’s W. O. Decker, the 1930 wood-hulled tugboat of South Street Seaport Museum.

Click here for some of the dozens of posts I’ve included Decker in.

The last three photos are by Will Van Dorp;  thanks to Michael, Allan, Sally,  Kyle, and George for the other photos.

The sixth boro–just like those other ones–is a crossroads.  In just a short span of time,  boats from Texas (note the Great Loop pennant on the bow)  and

Quebec pass . . . and they’re soon out of sight and gone.  But occasionally,

boats pass through, singly or in twos, and

you can follow their journey, as is the case with TwoTugsTravelin’     aka Sally W and Salty Paws,  who  hope to do the miniloop and be back through NYC in mid July, by way of the Canal, Lake Ontario, Rideau Canal by June 19, Ottawa River by the 28th, and the Richelieu by July 3.  And then in Maine waters

Will Van Dorp August 2015

by early August, by which time I hope the sun’s out.  Happy traveling’…

Thanks to Glenn Raymo for the two photos directly above.

The others by Will Van Dorp, who invites any bloggers traveling interesting waterways this summer to get in touch.  Here’s a cruiser going up the Pacific side of Central America.

 

As Aleksandr travels from port to port in Western Europe, he periodically sends photos like this one from Gdansk . . . Herkules is barely six months old . . . and doing what it was designed and built for.  These photos also show the global homogeneity of the shipping industry.

Ditto this photo of Svitzer Rota.  Notice on the cranes beyond Annaba and Wilhelm, ZPMC also built and transported most of the state-of-the-art cranes in the sixth boro–as is true of the last batch of cranes, I think to arrive here– and everywhere else.  Places that once made cranes, like Clyde Iron Works, no longer do.

Svitzer Rota and Vidar and the rest of these photos come from Bremerhaven, Europe’s fourth largest port.  Click here for a photo of Svitzer Vidar arriving in port on a heavy lift ship.

Svitzer is a Maersk company with hundreds of tugboats like this, and is certainly a strong argument for the Jones Act remaining in place.

 

Svitzer Mallaig and

Marken are both Dutch-registered and built in 2005.

Many thanks to Aleksandr, whose photos and drawing previously appeared here.

This post follows on one I did seven and a half years ago, here.

The first photo--Donna J. with B. No. 272— comes thanks to Jed, whose Caribbean tugs you may recently have seen here.   Donna J. is moved by two EMD R20-710G7C-T3 generating 10,000 hp.  Also notable is her fuel capacity of 301,504 gallons of fuel, which if I used the right formula, converts to 1055 metric tons of diesel.

Here are more recent Bouchard units photos starting with Jane A. with B. No. 225 on the North River,

Evening Star passing IMTT Bayonne,

Boys crossing the southern tip of Newark Bay,

Buster with B. No. 255, 

Ellen with B. No. 280 in the same anchorage same day,

Buster and Evening Mist . . . and how about the one to the left?  Guesses?

It’s Doris Moran last week.

Thanks to Jed for the photo of Donna J;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here was 53.

So many large ships pass through the sixth boro that unlimited time and a large staff of passionate observers could make ship watching (and learning from the experience) a tourist attraction.  Some of the names intrigue . . . like Stove Friend . . . recently built in the home of a quarter of all seafarers, the Philippines.

Axel Maersk may be one of the “longest” container ships that have called in the sixth boro, loa 1155′ x 140,’  assisted here by JRT, Jonathan C, and Miriam Moran.

Ibrahim Dede, here with escort Amy C McAllister, has been calling in NYC for almost as long as I’ve been doing this blog.

Eternal Ace . . . one of the 6400-car capacity PT, looks quite streamlined for a PCC or PCTC, but a newer design is coming . ..

Navios Venus is another fairly new bulk carrier.

I’ve seen CMA CGM Maupassant before, but this is the first time featured on this blog.  Kirby Moran, along the starboard side, seems to have a swell approaching from astern.

Liberty . . . last time I saw her she was Topeka, one of the T-class, and yet I can find no reference to a name change.  Hmmm.

Tanker MTM New Orleans . . . barely over a year old, is assisted here by Eric McAllister.

SCT Matterhorn leaving the Narrows bound for sea here has Basel as her homeport.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who just found out about this related event . . . related in that it focuses on the wet 2/3s of the planet.

 

This post follows up on Whatzit 36 . . . here.

Yup, it’s more parts for “the vessel.”

The two photos above come from Tony Acabono.  The rest come from Will Van Dorp.

Here Emily Ann moves some parts on Witte 1402 westbound, which confused me until I understood the routes.

 

So the parts arrive in USA/sixth boro from an Italian port on the Gulf of Trieste via a ship calling in Bayonne. Then they are stored in Port Newark until all efforts converge on getting

them here . . .

over in the the section of midtown Manhattan aka Hudson Yards, yards as in

train yards just of the west side of Penn Station Manhattan.  And there,

this monster called “the vessel” has begun rising.  At that link, you find a great slideshow featuring both with DonJon equipment and heavy lift trucks.

Since we’re talking public art, here is more I’ve seen recently . . .  Dale Chihuly’s blown glass creations displayed in the New York Botanical Garden, now until late October 2017.

Here’s more info on NYBG.

Then there’s this–which I just noticed yesterday– in Rockefeller Center, and which thankfully comes down after today . . . a 45′ gas balloon where the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree stands in late fall/early winter . . ..

Many thanks to Tony for his photos;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,137 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

June 2017
M T W T F S S
« May    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930