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Right around this time four years ago, I saw my first dockwise vessel in the sixth boro and the loading process was lengthy.  There’s a link at the end of this post, by which time you’ll understand why I bring that up.

For now,  imagine what’s to the right of Smit Panther and Smit Schelde, and

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to the left of Smit Elbe and Smit Cheetah . . .

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Here it is . . . Armada Intrepid, an FPSO here lassoed in the Calandkanaal portion of the port of Rotterdam.

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And  . . . related or not . . .  Dockwise Vanguard,  queen of the heavy lift fleet, now enroute for the Riau Archipelago . . .

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Oh!  of course, they are related.  It’s time for a piggyback.

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All secure and keel of FPSO is already dry.

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A sailor too long at sea, upon seeing this approach, would panic!

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So here is the index of “groundhog day” posts I did four years ago.

For these photos, many thanks to Hans van der Ster of towingline.com and Jan Oosterboer via Fred Trooster.

Unrelated but talking about Dutch ideas for unusual housing, check out this idea.   Here are some photos from last year when I stayed at Botel in Amsterdam for a few days.

 

If you think the sixth boro has a wide variety of tugboats, you’ll agree it’s also surrounded by a variety of land–boro–scapes.

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l to r:  Thomas J. Brown, 1962 and Joyce D. Brown, 2002

from obscure to iconic.

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Eastern Dawn, 1978.  Previously Delta Mule and Grand Eagle

Here’s the Brooklyn passenger terminal and

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Evening Star, 2012

the anchorage in mid-Upper Bay,

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Nanticoke, 2007

Brooklyn Navy Yard,

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Bridgeport, 1982.  Previously, Dragon Lady and others

Williamsburg,

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Miss Gill, 1970.  Previously Mister Mike, Samson, and other.

Bayonne,

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Eric R. Thornton, 1960.  Previously Roger Williams

east end of Wall Street,

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Pelham, 1960.  Previously Little Joe, Tucana, and other

entrance to the Kills showing the Bayonne Bridge and obvious modifications to the bases,

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Eastern Dawn again

and finally the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges.

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the Browns again

All photos this week by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s the index on previous second lives posts.  I use “second lives” for what land folk call “adaptive reuse.”  It strikes me that there may be more instances of repurposing re-design and -engineering on water than on land, but that’s may just be my opinion.

But first, I thought to call this “pre-boomed” to follow up on yesterday’s post and the wonderful backstory I got in email yesterday from William Lafferty, frequent contributor here.  Here also sent along the photo below, which shows Twin Tube in 1951, i.e., before I was born and I’m 63.

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Here’s part of what William wrote:  “It shows the Twintube just after it entered service in fall 1951.  Twintube was launched 28 August 1951, Captain Blount’s mother doing the honors, and built on Blount’s account.  He used it as a travelling “demonstrator” for his shipyard’s products (it was Blount’s hull number 6) but also used it to haul oysters.  Power plant originally was a rather rare 4-cylinder Harnischfeger 138-hp Diesel.  (Click here for a 1950 news article including a photo of a 6-cylinder marine diesel.)  Harnischfeger (the H in the mining equipment manufacturer P & H) had been set up in 1945 at Port Washington, Wisconsin, by P & H to exploit the workboat and yacht market.  P & H closed the division, then at Crystal Lake, Illinois, in 1963.  In spring 1952 Blount sold the vessel to the Staten Island Oil Company, who converted it to a tanker with a 40,000 gallon capacity in eight 5,000 gallon compartments within its “tubes.”  The rest is, as they say, history.”

By the way, reference to “Staten Island Oil Company” brings me back to one of my favorite articles by the late great Don Sutherland here.

Here’s the index for all my previous Blount posts.

All this repurposing leads me to the second half of this post.  A friend named Matt–former all-oceans sailor–is looking to write a serious history about Cross Sound Ferry vessel Cape Henlopen, ex- USS LST-510.  Note the 510 still carried on its starboard bow.  She was built in the great shipbuilding state of Indiana.

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Cape Henlopen preparing to depart Orient Point March 2014

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Here she passes Orient Point Lighthouse at the start of its 80-minute ride over to New London.

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Matt is interested in interviewing past and present crew and seeing old photos of the vessel in any of its previous lives:   Cape Henlopen, MV Virginia Beach, USS Buncombe County, or LST-510.  If you send your interest in participating directly to my email, I’ll pass it along to Matt.

Many thanks again to William Lafferty for the Twintube story and photo.  I took the photos of Cape Henlopen in March 2014.  Here’s a version of the vessel by bowsprite.

 

 

Here’s the index for previous Twin Tube posts.  This freight vessel is 64′ x 19′ x 8.5, and I’m sure I’ve mentioned before that it is one of the first Blount built vessels ever, launched in 1951.  Here’s the index to all my previous  Blount posts.

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Twin Tube January 2013

This is how I imagine her, but recently . . .

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the boom has been missing.  I don’t know the story, but I’d like to.

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Twin Tube April 2015

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and the brants are discussing it . . .

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Dec 2013 approaching the gauntlet of Balder‘s docklines

Most larger cargo vessels provisioned by Twin Tube have their own on-board cranes, so maybe the boom was removed to avoid having to negotiate the dock lines as she had to here in a blinding snowstorm back a year and a half ago.

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dipping under the the boom under the lines

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and then raising it again

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated but important:  If you are local, free and have the slightest inclination to make merry, there’s a soiree on Lehigh Valley 79 THIS Friday night, as a means to consolidate doubloons to keep the barge afloat.  Details here.  See you there, if my best approximation of pirate hood.  Here’s a post I did nearly five years ago.  And one more.

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Up, up,

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and in.  All new builds follow the same arc, even though the details differ.  Check out the splash of Onrust here over a half decade back.  Here’s how the water came up to meet Pegasus back five years ago.

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To finish the dory, there’s a trip

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through the Kills and

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across Raritan Bay to get to Cheesequake Creek.  Pam writes, “Carl Baronowshi, owner of the yard was helpful in determining the rig. Traditionally it would have been a push the boom up alongside the mast and unstep the whole business and lay it in the boat. I wasn’t strong enough to list the mast out of the step without raising havoc if it got out of the step, John help me figure out a gooseneck and track arrangement so we could lower the sail in a less cumbersome manner.”

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Ibis is launched,

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boarded, and

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eager to what she was built for.

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More photos follow.

 

You saw it here back in October as well as here just almost exactly a year ago at the start Summer Sea Term 2014.  More info on the itinerary here.  The first five photos come thanks to Jonathan Steinman and Rand Miller.

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Hell Gate does not often see vessels of this size and style.  For a vessel past the half century mark, TS Empire State VI has classic lines.

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Here she leaves the top end of Roosevelt Island to port.

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The rest of these photos I took.

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TS Empire State passing Evening Tide at U Thant Island

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Williamsburg Bridge

One of the two assist tugs–I’ll include more photos of the assist tugs later–was McAllister Brothers.

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The East River is spanned by eight bridges.  These two are the Brooklyn and the Manhattan Bridges.

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She traverses the Upper Bay,

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stopping only briefly as Rosemary Miller comes alongside, before

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heading through the Narrows and

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out to sea.  The plan to to drop the hook off Montauk overnight to do some drills before heading for Delaware Bay, the C & D Canal, the Chesapeake, and then Chareston SC before heading across the Atlantic.

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There are calls for a newer training vessel for SUNY here.

Many thanks to NYMedia Boat and Sean Shipco for conveyance.  Have a great summer at sea, cadets.   And again, thanks to Jonathan and Rand for photos from the “east” end of the East River.

 

The last photo of yesterday’s post here showed a dory in the beginning stages of construction.  Its placement there conforms to Chekhov’s gun principle.  So here’s what follows.  Maybe I should call this post  . . .” in the shadow of an old building and protected by the body of a Chinese laundry truck,  Ibis hatches, fledges, and more . . .” but that would be rather long.   So just enjoy.

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Garboards in place,

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planks fastened and plugs driven . . .  About the clamps, Pam says “they are simple and brilliant. They have really long jaws to be able to reach across a plank to clamp the new plank to the one already in place. Wedges get tapped into the other end to tighten the grip.”

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Sheer strake in place,  and now

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it’s time to roll her over.

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“Dories are usually built on their frames which act as the mold stations – I would do it that way if I built another dory. We used the mold stations and steam bent frames to go into the boat. Steam bending is an experience, although hair-raising… handling a hot piece of wood, and maneuvering clamps quickly before wood cools… It is hugely satisfying though.”

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Ibis has a beautiful bow, soon to be cutting through sixth boro waters

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Again, many thanks to Pamela Hepburn for use of her photos and in some cases, her commentary.

 

 

 

Here is the index of posts from two years ago showing an older Jersey City and environs.

All of the following photos/collages come compliments of Pam Hepburn, master of the 1907 tug Pegasus aka  “Peg” and the godmother of the Pegasus Preservation Project.  Many posts devoted to Peg can be found here.

In the collage below taken from atop a crane,  you are looking east from a midpoint in the Morris Canal.  The Twin Towers serve as a reference, as does the Statue of  Liberty to the right horizon.  Pam has included text, which I will not duplicate.  She mentions the white vessel Chauncey M. Depew, which you can see here.  Also mentioned is the M/T Mary Gellatly;  here is another–I believe–Gellatly tanker. Today marinas fill the canal, the north side is largely built up, and the south side is Liberty Landing State Park.

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This photo was taken from the same crane but looking west.

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Taken on the north side of the canal and near the border with Hoboken, here was new life springing forth.  More photos of this new life soon.

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Many thanks to Pamela Hepburn for use of these photos.

And thanks to all who commented on the captions yesterday.  This morning when I opened wordpress to prepare this post, the captioning option was nowhere to be seen.  Oh, the mystery of software!!

 

Note:  This morning I noticed that wordpress has automatically added a captioning space below each photo, so I’ve decided to use it.  What unifies this set of photos is the fact that it shows three of the most powerful NYC-based tugs that primarily assist powered vessels into and out of the port.

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Laura K. Moran

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Eric McAllister

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Robert E. McAllister

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Laura K.

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Eric

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Robert E. and a patched up Amy C McAllister

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Laura K.

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Eric

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Robert E.

I think the last time I used a photo of Amy C McAllister was here, actually not that long ago.  Here’s a comparison of the three boats featured here by horsepower.

Eric McAllister–5150, Laura K–5100, and Robert E–4000.  I suspect the sixth boro will be seeing a new Moran vessel with 6000 horsepower by mid-summer.

Let me know what you think of the use of captions.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Click here to see the series.

Recognize the actor/character gazing into the dry dock at Ocean Wrestler?  When I saw this on a streaming rerun–whatever you’d call it now–I suspected the name Ocean Wrestler was a prop added for the show.  More on that later.  According to the script, this was a dry dock in Norfolk, but in fact it was filmed in North Vancouver for release in 1995.  Got it figured out?

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Here’s another screen grab . . . season 3 episode 9 of

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the X-Files.  Here’s the episode info.

I’m a lifelong fan of sci-fi and X-Files is one of the few TV shows of any sort I’ve watched in my life.  But enough of that.

So the name was real for the early mid-1990s.  The vessel was launched in Oostend, Belgium in 1972 as Wrestler.  The name evolution since then goes like this:  renamed Ocean Wrestler in 1989 until 1996, then Hadisangsuria until 1998 when it reverted to Ocean Wrestler until 2011, then Malysh until May 2014, and supposedly is still operating as Kunduz.  The whole story and specs can be found here.

My reaction to the top photo is delight in thinking that FBI Agent Mulder may admire the lines of this ocean wrestler as much as I do.

No photos by Will Van Dorp, who is grateful to the unnamed photographers of the X-Files series.   Turn the volume up and enjoy the theme music here.

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