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By the numbers today, Daisy Mae,  launched in late 2017 and generating 3200 hp.

Joyce D. Brown, built 2002 and 2600 hp.

Matthew Tibbetts, 1969 and 2000.

James E. Brown, 2015 and 1000.

Dean Reinauer, 2013 and 4260.

Andrea, 1999 and 3000.

Elizabeth McAllister, 1967 and 4000.

Ellen McAllister, also 1967 and 4000.

Kimberley Turecamo, 1980 and 3000.

Joan Turecamo, 1980 and 4300.

Joan Moran, 1975 and 4300.

Miss Ila, 1962 and 2400.

All photos by Will Van Dorp; all numbers from tugboat information.

 

May 15, 2018 was the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Barge Canal.  That fact was mentioned at the ceremonies opening the Canal to recreational traffic yesterday, and quite a diverse and international flotilla of recreational boats waited, like racers on the starter’s blocks.

But first, do you recognize this captain?

Well, he waved at all these school kids who serenaded him and all the other boats, first of the season, leaving lock E2.  For prices on similar Hinckley 36 picnic boats, click here.

Sonically greeting them also were two Canal vessels:  Governor Cleveland and Grand Erie.

But let’s step back about 15 minutes.  The lower gates of E2 open to reveal the queue.

The nearest boat to the left was driven by the gentleman I asked whether you could identify.  The large vessel to the right — a 78′ Azimut Benetti Spa registered in Grand Rapids MI–was rumored to belong to a well-known professional basketball player.

 

It was the second batch locking through that brought the more unique westbound boats.

The green vessel —Oliver Plunkett-– Canadian registry, was returning from a stint in the Bahamas.  Her PEI fishing pedigree is quite noticeable.

Troll–hailing from Elburg NL– intrigues me, but I can’t point out anything besides an unusual name and bright hull color, both of which you’ve already noticed.

Broadsword, German registry, is a 58′ New Zealand-built Artnautica LRC 58 motoring around the world to the east, although here headed west.

Each of these boats has a story, many stories, I’ll never know.

 

And finally, this Florida-registered Axopar caught my attention too late and too far from the camera.  But, check out these Finnish boat designs.

To see some unusual recreational boat designs, lock E2 is the place to be on opening day.  I would be remiss, however, to leave out reference to commercial vessels . . . several of whom have already locked through, and that may be a story I pick back up in a few days.

The first boat here–a Nordhavn 62– was an unusual vessel to see up in Waterford.

And the person at the helm of the Hinckley, it was Geraldo Rivera, whom you’ve likely heard of.  But, check out his info on this wiki page for lots of tidbits you probably don’t know, eg, he attended SUNY Maritime, he’s a lawyer, he went to West Babylon High School, and some scandals . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’d love to hear more about any of these boats at points farther west . . .

 

 

I’ll explain this photo and the title at the end of this post.

The big move began yesterday on schedule, timed with the tides, I was told, to fit the cargo under some of the Hudson River bridges . . .

The cargo was gussied up with sponsors much like you’d see on a NASCAR racer.

 

Three tugs accompany the Mormac 400 barge.

On the stern were Daisy Mae and Mister Jim.

Underneath the entire cargo were tires;  I counted about 32 “axles,” each with with duals, and I’m not sure how many sets of duals across there are.  Maybe someone has the correct number.

 

After getting photos in New Baltimore, I crossed the river and got the rest of these in Hudson NY.

On the bow, CMT Pike (1979) guides the load.

Mister Jim (1982) and Daisy Mae (2017) power the tow from the stern.

Here, unfortunately backlit, the tow passes the Hudson-Athens Light.  

Hudson has quite the interesting history, and a spectator I talked with said the port missed becoming the state capital by three votes.  The architecture of the town is visit-worthy.

So you might still be wondering about the title and the top photo.  Here’s the story:  as I focused on taking the photos in Hudson, on the shore with a dozen other folks, I heard a chant.  “USA USA USA” from a group of kids who were in the park enjoying the beautiful spring weather.  I can’t say how the chanting started, but they were certainly looking at this large cargo and noticing the “union made in the USA” sign, and pumping their arms, dancing, and chanting loud enough to get a reaction from some folks on the tugs.  My guess is that it was spontaneous.  As a friend of mine would say:  “Neat!!”

And the cargo, here’s an informative article from Workboat.  It’s a heat-recovery steam generator bound for Bridgeport CT;  as of this writing (0515 Tuesday), the tow is approaching Newburgh.  The schedule has it at the GW at 1700 this afternoon and anchored at the Statue by 2000 (8 pm), departing for the East River at 0300 Wednesday.

The photo below offers a view from the stern of Mister Jim, thanks to Ashley Hutto.

For some previous interesting cargoes moved by CMT tugs, click here (for beer) and here (for a previous HRSG).

Only 13 months ago, Cosco Glory could not have entered Port Elizabeth.  Now the +14,000-teu boats –more accurately called NYC’s 1200-footers, have become routine like T. Roosevelt, J. Adams, and Chongqing.

The geese are not even spooked.

Jonathan takes the starboard, and Kirby . . . port

while JRT and Margaret leverage the stern.

 

 

 

 

As of this writing, this crewman has most recently been treated to views of the Savannah waterfront.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Let’s start with two photos thanks to Ashley Hutto, first one from last year.  Remember the HRSG aka “the cyclops” that came down the Hudson?  Tomorrow, another is scheduled to start a journey, then heads for Bridgeport.

Mister Jim above and below as platform, as well as Daisy Mae in the distance, will be involved in the transfer.  By Tuesday late afternoon, the HRSC is scheduled to be at the GW Bridge, and will overnight near the Statue of Liberty before entering the East River and into the Sound.  I’ll miss most of it, since I’ll be in Albany all next week.

No . . . I’m not entering politics.

Another unusual visitor was captured here by Tim Hetrick;  Megan Beyel passes Storm King here, towing a barge upriver.  The photo effectively shows the scale of Storm King.

OSVs like Megan Beyel are quite rare in the Hudson Valley, but they do appear. Four years ago Michael Lawrence spent some time in and out of the sixth boro working on a pipeline project.

Of course, there is a sixth boro quasi-resident OSV . . .  Rana Miller.

 

Rana‘s frequent mission is transporting Yokohamas, used to fender tankers transferring product offshore.

 

And from rubber to rubber, here’s a small USN tug moving rendering barrier around.  This photo comes from George Schneider, who writes, “Your photo (scroll) represents the smallest of them, the 19-footers, [like this one] one towing fender-style booms  (barriers?), but they also work as gate boats for the anti-swimmer booms  (barriers?) mentioned.  As you can see this one is officially designated 19BB0212, but has the local designation BB4.  They adopt some of the jargon from their origins as log broncs  (and scroll to Skillful) and call them “Beaver Boats” to differentiate them from the other boats designed to transport or place the light oil pollution booms.   This one was built by Chuck’s Boat and Drive Company (“C-Bad”) of Longview, WA, who also built 25-foot version for the Navy.  I imagine you’d find them at just about any station where the Navy ties up their ships.  At least 12 of the 19-footers and at least 22 of the 25-footers have been built for the Navy, as well as other designs that begin to look more like conventional pushboats as they grow in size. ”  Thanks much, George.

Finally, thanks to Steve Munoz, another one of these small tugs, this one spotted near the USS Constitution in Charlestown MA.

Many thanks to Ashley, Tim, George, and Steve for the photos and info.  The photos of Rana Miller by Will Van Dorp.

Too bad this intriguingly named RORO was so far away when I saw it.  Actually Drive Green is the project;  the actual vessel name is Drive Green Highway.  The project seeks to reduce NOx and CO2; it’s more streamlined, uses slippery hull coating, incorporates solar-powered LED lighting throughout the ship, and more.  Click here for RORO history.  I don’t know why the orange is not some version of chartreuse.

Breezy Victoria really should be parts of a “names” post, but I took it this same foggy visit to this part of the port.

Note the upper 400′ of the Staten Island side bridge tower is missing as

Pilot No 1 aka New York heads back out to her station.   Here from winter 2014 is the same boat at the same bridge in different weather.

If you use your peripheral vision, you can just make out West Bank Light off the starboard stern of pilot boat New York.

Orange Ocean follows the fog bank into the Narrows.

And here’s the vessel I came out to see:  Grande Mariner on her return from Honduras!!  Here you can see the West Bank Light a little more clearly.

I board Grande Mariner again in July, for some more tours of the Great Lakes.  Next winter’s plan for Grande Mariner is a trip to Panama! 

Having no pressing demands on Thursday morning, I went back down to the Narrows, and once again it was

socked in!

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Who knew so many types of fog exist?  I believe this is advection fog, and it’s patchy, forming only in places where warm air lays over cold moist areas, like ocean water in May, a common occurrence in the Upper Bay in springtime.

0849 hours:  I watched this ship come through the Narrows.  Around that hour, traffic was intense.  At one point less than half an hour earlier, I feared two MSC container ships were going to collide, but it was only my eyes playing tricks on me, with limited visibility.

0852  That’s Oleander overtaking the bulk carrier.

0852.23   At this point, I decided to see what conditions existed on the other side of the island.

0949  And here we are, less than an hour later.

0952  Jumeirah Beach is a white sandy waterfront area in Dubai.  I chuckled when the VTS folks announced her a “jeremiah beach,”  recalling when Hammurabi was announced as “ham berry.”

0955  No hint of fog existed here, about five miles away.

1000

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has lots more foggy and not-so-foggy photos to post.

Click here for the Pacific Basin homepage.

 

On a windy day recently in the Beerkanaal section greater Rotterdam harbor, Jan Oosterboer took these photos, passed along by Jan van der Doe.

The small boats here are operated by the KRVE, self-translated as “rowers” but more likely we’d call them linesmen.  The more distant KRVE boat is alongside Smit Cheetah.  The link that follow are mostly for previous instances these boats have appeared on this blog.

Here’s their own site in English.

Fairplay 27

SD Rebel

Multratug 31

In the distance newly-launched LNG carrier Vladimir Rusanov, shuttling between Rotterdam and Russian Kara Sea port of Sabetta.   I had to look up Sabetta, since I’d not heard of it:  average annual temperature is 14 degrees F, -10 C

Above and below, that’s Smit Hudson.

Iskes tug Venus is about three years old. 

 

Above and below FairPlay X,

which has not been on this blog before.  Multratug 5 shows her Japanese origins, 

here with Beagle, new this spring.

Many thanks to Jan and Jan for these photos.  Any errors in text are mine.

 

Here are previous installments and related ones.

Technically, infrastructure could include launch services, without which port activities would slow.

Survey services ensure that channels and depths at docks allow activity without literal impediment.

USACE overlaps with Rogers in some areas.

But more commonly when one thinks of infrastructure, it’s what allows terrestrial activity,

like bridges and their on- and off-ramps.

With all the bridge building and innovation going on the the greater land area around the sixth boro, it’s not surprising to see bridge components arrive this way.   And what travels on the waterways post-demolition isn’t only parts of roadways; here large pieces of scrapped vessel traveled.

New bridge component above, old bridge component below . . .

Without liquid infrastructure, these would not be moving.

Thanks to Glenn Raymo for use of his photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Imagine my excitement the other day when I caught Weeks newest trailing suction hopper dredge (TSHD) come briefly into the sixth boro, likely for fuel or gear.  I believe she’s working along the Jersey shore.

Magdalen, named for Chairman Weeks’ mother, is big:  356′ x 80′ with a loaded draft of 25.3′  with hopper capacity of 8550 cubic yards of dredge spoils.  A comparison could be made with TSHD Ocean Traverse Nord with capacity of 1543 cubic yards.

For all the specs, click here and go to page 13 of the Weeks Winter 2017 Newsletter.

 

Her first project was in North Carolina in January 2018.

A similar type TSHD featured here recently was Filippo Brunelleschi, which is significantly larger for different jobs:  465’x 90.2′ with hopper capacity of 14,750 cubic yards.  Currently the world’s largest TSHD by hopper capacity is Leiv Eiriksson, 60,165 cubic yards, with dimensions of 764′ x 134,’  currently in Tuzla, Turkey.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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