You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘tugster’ tag.

I airbrushed away the name, but the rest of the gray is undercoating, i.e., original color.  This has to be one of five identical (I’m told) boats.  Guess, if you wish, before you scroll.

 

 

My guess is that she’s having some repairs, upgrades, periodic inspections . . .

Coho is the second of five FIN class boats built for Penn Maritime, one root of which was Morania.  Click here for a candler that went as Morania No. 8.

 

The other FIN class boats now in Kirby livery are Skipjack and Yellowfin, which I’ve never seen, as well as Bluefin and Mako.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Quick.  Name this unit . . . or at least the current and previous operators?

I haven’t seen many Gateway Towing tugs along my usual haunts, but here’s Connecticut.

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Nanticoke, about 10-years-old now, the second of the Patapsco 4200 hp class, pushes a payload enclosed in Doubleskin 305.

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Pacific Reliance, at the dock, is made up to the 650-1, whose capacity is 155,000 bbl.

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So . .  that unit in the top photo is Genesis Vision, formerly Superior Service

pushing GM 6508. Here was a photo of the tug as Superior Service, only four years ago.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And if you have not seen it yet, here’s an 18-minute video of the saga of the former Katie G and Colleen McAllister, which I captured the first hours of here as they headed east on the East River on their long journey to western Michigan. Here was my Part 2 of that voyage, with collaboration from colleagues.

Here from eight years ago is Katie G moving petroleum product and remaking a tow right off the Battery.

I’ve done a few dozen “port of” posts in the past few years.

I won’t tell you where Akureyri is yet,

but the geography is a clue.

So is the name of this pilot boat, which was built in this port.  Sleipnir was built in 1995, with dimensions 52′ x 16.4′ and is powered by a single 700 hp Cummins.  Mjolnir is slightly older and smaller.

Last chance to guess . . .

And the location of Akureyri is midway east-west along the north shore of Iceland, and about as far from Reykjavik as is Boston-New York.  Sleipnir was built here.

Many thanks to Klaus Intemann, whose site is here.  Klaus is looking eagerly for photos from NYC that relate to the departure this spring of Peking for Germany.

Did you recognize the name Sleipnir, an appropriate name for a pilot boat . . . ?

Answer is here.

 

Chandra B may be small in size,

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but she of the American Petroleum & Transport, Inc., is

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big in personality.

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And Emma Miller and Marine Oil Service, I’d like to know you better.

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Both small tankers here–one for fuel and the other for lube oil–seem often accompanied by birds.  I wonder why . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Hats off to the small boats that work all year round . . . crew boats,

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patrol boats,

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fishing boats,

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line boats,

pilot boats,

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dive boats,

more fishing boats,

more crew boats,

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government boats,

more —soon to face major cuts--government boats

more line and boom boats,

and here’s a special . . . a historic life boat, long atop Binghamton, which is still intact as far as I know, and a bit longer ago had

guys in hazmat suits doing the last ever lifeboat drill aboard the 112-year-old condemned ferry.

And finally, of course there’s the New York Media Boat. 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who gives a hat tip to all the crews in small boats on the big waters.

 

Surprises can be ranked in degrees.  Here was a surprise . . . people walking way up on the Bayonne Bridge back in 2011.  Ditto here I was looking into a hot tub on the stern of a scrap-carrying bunker (photo#7).

The surprises in this post emerge slowly.

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This PCTC has been on this blog before, as has Kirby Moran.

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That it’s called Don Juan was surprising the first time I saw it, but this line names some of its vessels after characters from opera, so Don Juan fits.

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But the detail below–just forward of the radomes– blew me away.  In fact, when I took the photo, I had no idea what it was, maybe some netting, I imagined.  But a painted-on bower?  Or is it painted on . . . maybe it’s real bougainvillea?  Is there a Don Juan aboard who uses this as his love nest?  Here’s stanza XVIII from Lord Byon’s epic Don Juan Canto 1:

Perfect she was, but as perfection is
Insipid in this naughty world of ours,
Where our first parents never learned to kiss
Till they were exiled from their earlier bowers,
Where all was peace, and innocence, and bliss,[b]
(I wonder how they got through the twelve hours),
Don José, like a lineal son of Eve,
Went plucking various fruit without her leave.

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Next . . . even stranger, I think.  See TS Kennedy over next to the GMD Graving Dock and Anthem of the Seas out beyond that?  Surprise?

Version 2

A giraffe?!  !@#!

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Maybe it’s an amusement.  Maybe it’s a stand-in for emergency drills?  I went looking and found out about Gigi.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Let me start here . . . the boat below can be yours.  Click on the photo for full information.  It’s currently in the Seattle area, and I’m posting this for a friend.

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Turecamo Girls –this one was launched in 1965 and is rated at 1950 hp.  Here was a previous version, which may or may not still be working in South America.

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Gulf Venture–She’s a new vessel in this harbor.  Launched in 2016 and “married” to Gulf Carrier, call her powerful at 5150 hp.

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Any guesses?

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Tangier Island, the tug, 2014 and 3000 h.

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Mister Jim, 1982 and 1800 hp.

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This Stephanie Dann, 1978 and 3200.

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Evening Mist, 1976 and 3000.

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Here she’s framed by the bow of Yantian Express.

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Finally, James Turecamo, 1969 and 2000.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who recalls a wonderful tour of parts of the Salish Sea aboard Coot (for sale above) almost seven years ago here.

Since I’m off gallivanting in a very cold place, how about some warm five-boros’ tagging, following in the spirit here. Of course, in the sixth boro, meow man rules all tagging, as I paid tribute here three years ago. Photo below I took a few weeks ago in Manhattan.  It says what Manhattan can be . . . or NYC for that matter.

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Here’s a photo from bowsprite, and no matter how ambitious she is with brushes, she did not paint this.  All her photos in this post are from Brooklyn. I apologize I have no Bronx photos, but the Bronx is the unknown boro for me.  Anyone help?  And Queens . . . is it me or is there no wall art there?

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Here’s the other side of dreams . . . heartbreak.  Maybe someone more studied in this vernacular can explain the winged disks in her hands. Again, Manhattan and my photo.

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Here’s another bowsprite photo of a complex tag, maybe some allusion here to meow man?

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This comes from the edge of Little Italy, mine.

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Hers, in Brooklyn.

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Faded by too much spotlight.  Mine.

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Staten Island has a different character;  I took the next ones just off Bay Street, where NYCArtsCypher.org seems to base itself.

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And the images are as diverse as the area is, as polyglot as this city is.  Less than 300 yards behind the Tapas place, you’re in the water, in the Bay, in the sixth boro.

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I love the lobster there.

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Photos by a team.

 

Really random means photos from widely separated places by different people.  So here goes . . . the first two from Jed, who took them in the former Dutch Antilles about a year ago.  Triton is home-ported in Ijmuiden, another must-see place in the Netherlands if you’re interested in workboats. Click here for some posts I did about Ijmuiden, the mouth of the waterway out to sea from Amsterdam. Click here for a photo of Triton I took a few years back in Ijmuiden.

photo date 23 APRIL 2016

photo date 23 APRIL 2016 by Jed

Andicuri, named for a beach which itself is named for an Arawak chief,  was built just south of Rotterdam in 1983.

photo date 23 APRIL 2016

photo date 23 APRIL 2016 by Jed

Until about a year ago, Sand Master worked out of the sixth boro mining sand;  recently it was sold to interests and was spotted–not photographed–in Surinam.

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photo date January 2012 by Will Van Dorp

Here’s a strange photo taken in April 2012 by Don Rittner, and part of a post called “Jets Along the Mohawk.”  Maybe I should have called it “early Cold War jets up the Flight of Five.”

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And finally, here’s a photo I took in Beaufort NC in June 2013, Fort Macon tied up near the phosphate dock.

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I hope you enjoyed these bounces within the northern half of the American hemisphere.

 

It seemed just a few weeks ago I’d seen her, but it was just over 60 days, the time it takes to get from the sixth boro to China and back.  But there she was passing Robbins Reef Light.

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Starboard and

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port, she was controlled,

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starboard, port, and

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more.

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Evergreen was founded by Chang Yung-Fa with a single ship in 1968.

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Anyone visit their maritime museum in Taipei City?

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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