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Since he worked for 35 years on the Delaware, Barrel has a lot of photos from there, including Brooklyn McAllister (1986 and McAllister’s first tractor tug),

br1BROOKLYN McALLISTER

Charles Burton (1967 and now painted red, I believe),

br2CHARLES BURTON

Ensign (1977), and

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of course, Big Daddy (1954).

br4BIG DADDY-3

 

All photos from Barrel, whom I thank.

I first saw this type of derrick boat and heard it referred to as a derrick boat on the Erie Canal, and did a post about it here.

I haven’t been able to find much out about these boats, but enjoy.  Here’s USACE Derrick boat No. 13,

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two views of USACE Derrick boat Erie,

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USACE derrick boat McCauley,

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a newer looking USACE Derrick boat 8,

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And finally, the 500+ ton capacity floating crane Henry M. Shreve.

0aad5usaceHENRYmShreve

 

Many thanks to Barrel for these photos.

“I have worked on two salvage tugs,” writes Jan.  “The first one, Hercules in 1957-1958, was a seagoing salvage-tug/icebreaker built in 1943 for the German Air Force/Navy to salvage plane wrecks in the Baltic Sea.  After the war the tug sailed for Bugsier and came under the Dutch flag in 1950.  In 1984 [ as Temi IV] it capsized and sank. Salvaged and scrapped.”
jvd1Hercules
“The second one was Zeepaard [ trans. Seahorse] in 1960-1961.   Zeepaard was built in 1947 and used as tug/salvage tug by Tak’s Berging (W.A van den Tak Bergings Bedrijf N.V.),  a sister company of L. Smit & Co. Internationale Sleepdienst Mij. N.V.  Still in service.  Now as a pusher-tug with the name Liberty.”
jvd3ZEEPAARD

 

Thanks, Jan.

Click on the image below for an interactive map of this portion of the sixth boro.  Right now at about the 9 o’clock position you see two small white specks.  They

bayontanks

are the huge spherical tanks seen off Barbara McAllister‘s stern.

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Consider the size of the wraparound stairs and you’ll understand why locally they’re called “gorilla’s balls.”.

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So here’s what the tugboat fueling station looks like from the north bank of the KVK, and

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here looking west.

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Here’s looking NE across the tank farm, and

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from the landslide looking eastward across Robbins Reef Light to Brooklyn.

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Off the bow of Oleander–the incoming small container ship, would be the Staten Island ferry racks,

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and here’s looking south across tanker Navig8 Spirit toward the salt pile. But here’s the surprise, inside the fence and between the tanks,

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there’s a very old cemetery, which pre-dates the use of this land for oil.

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It’s Constable Hook Cemetery, founded by Pieter van Buskirk.

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Who knew?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Many thanks to Jack Kennedy for arranging for this tour.

 

I’m putting these photos up although I know little about these boats, starting with Pennsgrove.  Her lines would make a great cruiser.

0aadPennsgrove50a

 

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A similar vessel in the sixth boro is Hudson.  Again, all I’ve learned is that she was built in 1963 and

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loa is 50.’

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This last photo I took on January 14, 2016.   She too would make a good cruiser, I think.

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Thanks to Barrel for the first two photos;  the others are by Will Van Dorp, who is still out off most grids.

Thanks to the robots for posting.

Here’s GLDD’s cutter suction dredge Florida as seen from above the cutter head and

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photo taken October 2010 in the KVK

from alongside.  I took the first three photos in this post.

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photo taken October 2010

Here’s Weeks cutter suction dredge C. R. McCaskill with Sea Wolf serving as a tender.

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photo taken near Rockaway Inlet September 2013

USACE E. A. Woodruff was built in 1873 and worked the Ohio. Technically, I think Woodruff was a snag boat.

0aab1E A Woodruff Corps of Engineers Snag Boatc 1910

USACE Florida was the most technologically advanced dredge built when it was launched in 1904.  Unfortunately, she sank with loss of life 14 years later and is currently a dive site.

0achsDredge and Snagboat Florida - 1918

USACE Barnard was built in 1904 as well in Camden and sold to Mexico in 1942.

0achs1Dredge Barnard Tampa 1924-1925

Here’s another view of Barnard with

0achs2Dredge Bernard Tampa Florida - 1924

a tender alongside.  It looks a lot like the buoy boats on the Erie Canal.

0achs3Dredge Bernard Tampa Florida - 1924

Dredge Welatka was built in 1925.

0aab2Dredge Welatka Florida 1938

Dredge Congaree was built in 1914 in Charleston SC.

0achs4Dredge Congaree intercostal Water Way - 1940

Here’s USACE Potter originally built in 1932 and still in use.

0achsPotter Repowered

For many more vintage USACE photos, click here.

Many thanks to Barrel for this trip through USACE technological history.

I remember the day I first saw McFarland, coming up the Delaware, the largest dredge I’d ever seen.  Barrel has recently sent along earlier generations–as I see it–of the big Mac.

Let’s start with Goethals, built in 1937.

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Then there was Markham, seen here just prior to launch, and

0aa60Markhampre

here she traverses in icy waters.  Can dredge operations proceed with ice?

0aadMARKhamice

Here she pumps out.  Markham was reefed off North Carolina in 1994.

0aad60Markham

McFarland went into service in 1967.  Her operations are described here by the skipper.

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Here she’s at work on the Delaware River.  This method of discharging is called side casting.

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Here she’s preparing to discharge into the transfer barge.

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All these photos come via Barrel.

For more background on these federal dredges, click here.

 

 

aka GHP&W 8, subset of port of Bayonne.  Actually, MOTBY expands to Military Ocean Terminal Bayonne and you saw an aerial of it here.

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T-AKR 313 USNS Red Cloud is named not for the place but for this person, Mitchell Red Cloud.

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I took these photos in November 2015, but as of mid-January, Red Cloud was still in Bayonne Dry Dock. 

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Rat guards, they’re called and they’ve fascinated me since I first saw them.  They’re functional and pretty.

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Did you notice that the red ones, though pretty, are not functional?

I hadn’t either until now.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is still in a region without internet or telephone signal, and only the robots are working.

Earlier this month gothamist.com ran an intriguing set of photos taken by Mr. Cushman.  Here’s his entire archive.  Here’s a good selection.

The warehouses on the opposite side of the river from red vessel below are the current location of Brooklyn Bridge Park.  That makes the pier location a little south of piers 16 and 15. South Street Seaport Museum’s boats today.  Could that be Ollie, the stick lighter currently disintegrating in Verplanck?

cwc1

I’m not sure what we’re looking at here, but the Cushman identifies it as 1941.  According to Paul Strubeck, it’s likely an express lighter–a category of self-propelled vessel I was not aware of–possibly operated by Lee and Simmons Lighterage.

cwc2battry 1941

And finally . .  I wish this photo–dated September 1940-– had been framed differently.  Phillip’s Foods is still around, although I’ve never eaten at any of their restaurants or if this is even the same company.  Royal Clover . .  . I can’t find anything about that brand.  And seeing all those cartons in Jeff and the barges, today there’d be a few containers and you’d have no idea of the contents.

cwc3lighter jeff balt

You can search Cushman’s archives here. I cll these “fifth dimension” i.e., time added, photos.

For another treasure trove of photos of old New York harbor, click here.

 

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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