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This photo of Godfather should catch someone’s eye, but I’m going to direct that attention then to Paul Johnson’s wonderful site, which if you have an hour to kill, will make that go by in what seems a minute.  Thanks to RG, my brother-in-central-African-1970s-experiences for passing this along.  As to Godfather, she’s by a year or so an older sibling of the boats currently known as Atlantic Salvor and Atlantic Enterprise.  Currently, she’s called Crosby Enterprise.

Here was a surprise . . . Petrel in the sixth boro.  I haven’t seen her in quite a while, since I’m not in Philly much any more.

 

Here’s a head-on view of HMS Justice.

Thanks to Jed, here are some photos from last year showing the mighty Bluefin.

photo date 6 JUNE 2016

with photos taken in Virginia waters.

photo date 6 JUNE 2016

Jan van der Doe has recently returned from a trip to the Netherlands and sends along photos of these tugboats.  Given the stack logo, I’m guessing this one below is a live aboard, and

Alphecca was built in 1913, converted to diesel in 1959 and you can click here to see and hear the engine running.

Below, it’s FairPlay 23, which has appeared on this blog before.

Unrelated:  A reader wrote to ask this question:  “Could you help me find info about a little tug named the Ali M.  My friend SK owned and operated her out of Bayonne for a while and sold her before his passing many years ago.  I believe he had her at the Atlas Yacht club.  I was curious what ever happened to her.”            I don’t recall ever seeing a tug named Ali M.  Anyone help out here?  Anyone have a photo?

The reader is also looking for any info on the vessels shown below in a painting by his father from the 1990s.  Thanks for any help.

Thanks to RG, Jed, Jan, and Peter for sending these along.  And be careful out there.

Petrel and HMS Justice photos by Will Van Dorp.

or Bridge.

Below is a photo I took in October 2011 . . .

Also from October 2011, when the bridge looked like this,

squeezing under the roadbed looked like this, and

the McAllister stern quarter escort looked like this . . .

the mighty Maurania III, that is.  Here’s the complete post I did back then.

But five and a half  years have elapsed, not without change.  So earlier this week, Suez Canal in the KVK and under the Bayonne Bridge looked like this.  See the worker above the new roadbed?

See him now?

 

So this week it was Marjorie B on the stern, and

 

Ellen forward.

 

 

I hope to be around and doing this five and a half years from now to see what there is to see.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Yesterday I mentioned the request to help the Roaring Bull ferry project, and that’s now fully funded. Thank you.   Here’s another and more somber request that you might consider, the Captain Joseph Turi Memorial fund.

Sometimes posts just write themselves, like this one.  After seeing someone else post a photo of a large tugboat named Abundance and a barge named Stymie, I had to follow suit.  I tried unsuccessfully to find what or where Densa is.

Arctic Breeze as a spring morning dawns?

Ah . . . the good lord DOES have a village named for him upstate along the Erie Canal . . . , a village that’s also associated with other noteworthy folks.

Here I have a serious question . . .  is there a seacoast town anywhere where high school girls vie for this title as they do for such titles as Miss Apple Blossom?  Click here for some other crazy contests . . .

Oops . . I shot the photo too early.  Here’s a closer up view of what Michael Miller is pushing.

And if there’s a Suez Canal in the Kill Van Kull, might there be a Kill Van Kull in the Suez Canal?

And finally . . . do you remember Roaring Bull?  Well, they are a struggling ferry operation over Susquehanna, great people with a long history.  Maybe you can contribute some of your tax refund now and take a ride on the ferry later this summer.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Scrapper 1 focused on loading scrap from scows onto a bulker anchored in the Upper Bay.  Since then many posts, such as this one, have shown loaded scows pushed hither and yon in the harbor, and like this one, even down an ice-encrusted river.

Today’s post features a unit and a crew heading out bright and early to load scrap that once was the machinery of daily life.  In the shot below, I get the sense that the heat exhausting out the stack has just erased a segment of the Bayonne Bridge roadbed, cauterizing it.

Cauterizing is an extreme first aid term I’ve read about and grateful I’ve never had to perform.

I use the term here because this crew, small company, and 1960 machinery engaged in commerce illustrate how like a single organism really are the sixth boro and by extension the supply chain they fit so smoothly within.

Happy harvest, gentlemen.

All the rest could not happen without your part being played.

All photos and sentiments strictly by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here are previous installments of this title.  Marjorie B hurries alongside the container ship to assume position

closer to the bow, froth sprayed back by the head-on wind.

As they make their way through the gap,

all is lined up for the tight turn to starboard.

By the way, did you notice the landing net?

Well did you?  Actually I hadn’t either until later.

See the landing net stacked above the portside of Marjorie B?

Let’s roll back to a close up of the second photo, and there it is.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s always amazed by all the details I miss until I go back and look at the photos.

 

Guess the unit below here and

here?  Lots of similarities, and the one below was less than 10 minutes behind the one above, both westbound the Kills.

A and

B.  Guess now?

a is Viking pushing DBL 134.

B is new to the sixth boro, here pushing DBL 103.

New York and

New Orleans….

Viking, built in 1976 and powered at 4300 hp, is 132′ x 34′ and here pushing DBL 134, built in 1986, with capacity of 136k barrels.

Denali, built in 2010 and powered at 5000 hp, is 115′ x 36′ and here pushing DBL 103, built in 2005, with capacity of 101k barrels.

 

Random is  . . . well the word comes from French which comes from German which comes from some extinct language describing the galloping horses,  going just going without a pattern.  I might assemble in patterns, but they’re not really there.

So, first up it’s Helen Laraway, based in the burgeoning port of Coeymans.

Next, it’s the fairly new Crystal Cutler pushing Patricia E. Poling.

 

Color scheme give this away?

It’s Quenames . . .

 

And finally, as Quenames heads away from us, it’s Bering Sea (once known as Cougar and later Stacy Moran) on the approach

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wouldn’t remember any of this if not for Birk’s site.  Thx, Birk.

 

Sometimes I like to start new categories so that the numbers don’t get so high, boats no longer extant or frequent get a second look, and we realize that time is passing pretty fast.  So all the photos here I took more than seven years ago.  Some have been on the blog before, but not together and not edited exactly as they are now.

Like Norwegian Sea, she used to be a wintertime staple running up the River, easily recognizable by her upper wheelhouse.

Juliet is still around but not very busy under her new name . . . it seems.

This boat, like her namesake, is gone too soon. Pegasus is still around but no longer looks this way.

Zeus was on the Great Lakes after working in the sixth boro, but I’ve lost track of her.

Volunteer, another unmistakable profile, now long time gone from here.

Zachery  . . . still around and still working. High Peace is now registered Vietnamese and goes by Pvt Dolphin.

Just to break the pattern here, here’s a photo I took of Zachery a few days ago.

Take my word for this last photo . . . the distant unit I can’t identify although I’m guessing a Reinauer boat, but the closer vessel is outrageous.  Actually I mean Outrageous.  That’s the name.  Click here (and scroll) for a previous photo of Outrageous, which I believe used to be based in the sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Coming out of Newark Bay,

Hudson, the newest Vane 4200.

And a bit later, exiting the Arthur Kill past Shooters Island, it’s

Neptune, the former Chevron Snohomish.

 

I’ve not seen Neptune here much, and

here, thanks to Jonathan Steinman, here’s the first I see of Hudson pushing a barge likely toward the mid North Shore of Isle of Long.

All but the last photo by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Here was the first of Don’s great photos, from about a year ago.  And technically, it follows from this set of pizza seawall delivery photos I caught almost a decade ago.

Your own galley turns out some delicious fare, but sometimes you feel a craving for take out, for pizza that comes in a box, which is not so easy when you’re away from shore, but then, delivery . . .

for all!  And even an average pizza is

delectable!  And the photos, they give an exquisite hint of sixth boro culture.   Sometimes bumboats –like this one once did on the Great Lakes–do this, and more regularly crew boats do. No matter how an unexpected pizza gets delivered, the very unexpectedness of it makes it even tastier.

 

Thanks much to Don for use of these photos, especially for you who didn’t see them on FB.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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