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In celebration of the beginning of the 11th year of blogging, I’m licensing myself to change course a few days.  Two things I want you to know are 1) I’ve posted approximately 90% of the days since November 26, 2006, and 2) my eyes always search for details other than tugboats to photograph.

I’ve gone here in the past, and retreated.  Tugboats and ships have a lot in common with trucks, and my eye is always attracted by an unusual truck, so in the effort to show that I DO take photos of things NOT on the water, let me revive this line.  Should I go over to this side?  Call this R&R, rambling and rumspringa.

Admit . . . this is a cool truck, eh?  And I took the photo right atop Penn Station, too.  Can anyone tell me if this is the same one that lives near the Newport PATH station?  And might there be three of these on the banks of the sixth boro?

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Less well cared for, in Jersey City I saw this rusty Divco van next to a dumpster.  Anyone know if it’s for sale?  It might make a good camper?

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Now where along the sixth boro banks (SBB) these days might one find a Mammoet field car?  Answer follows.

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The other day I stopped to admire the calm and skill of a Shepherd Enterprises rig as he negotiated the streets under the south end of the High Line.  The driver told me it was a brand-spankin’-new Western Star.

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Here he’s about to back into a dock to his right.

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I was told this is a 1928

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Graham Brothers truck.

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Yes, it’s an Element and not really a truck, but if I were hitchhiking and this red head stopped, I’d run the other way, no matter what she might say.  I hope you’re convinced by now that I see a lot of strange stuff.

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In the port of Oswego, might this be waiting for a cargo for Fort Drum?  If I cropped this in a certain way, you might think the ingots are on the trailer?

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And we’ll end this digression here . ..  said to be a 1946 Dodge truck.  Cool!

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And the Mammoet field car was over by the NYWheel.

Fire off the free foton fireworks!

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For 3286 times before today I’ve posted since

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November 26, 2006.  My very first post was here.  In the big scheme of things, 10 years is a short time, yet I have seen a fair amount of change in my beat–the sixth boro–in that time, particularly shore features, bridges, and some of the actual vessels afloat.  I certainly have learned a lot since 2006.

It does take some time every day, and I’ve thought to discontinue many times . . .

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but I continue.  Thank you all for reading, commenting, correcting my errors and typos, answering my questions, suggesting ideas, sending along photos, offering me jobs, giving me work, inviting me to stuff, indulging my made-up words, recognized me, alerting me of events to shoot, unlocking doors, sending me gifts, buying me elixirs, sharing company, entrusting me with secrets, keeping me off the partisan shoals on FB, and generally being friendly.  You all have kept me going, have convinced me all this needs to be documented, and therefore, I’ve put at least 25,000 photos into the public domain.

Digital cameras make this documentation easy and the internet lowers the cost.  So I hope you continue to read the blog, respond, send along photos, and more.  If the photo enlarges well and it fits, I’ll use it, crediting you by name or pseudonym.  (Cell phone photos do not often work, unfortunately.)  The boro is complex, perspectives infinite, and the “gallivants beyond”  just plain innumerable.

Will I keep it up for another 10 years?  Who knows whether anyone will be alive next year . . . although I hope we’ll be.

Again, I am humbled and thank you.

Here was post 1000.

Here are anniversary posts from select previous years:  2008     2010    2011   2012   2014   2015

 

Let me start to play catch up here, since I have not done one of these posts in over half a year.  Anyone know why HMCS St. John’s (FHH-340) steamed into the sixth boro yesterday, Thanksgiving Day?  To assist this 45′ USCG response vessel and all the land-based law enforcement in keeping order on the so-called “black friday” chaos, perhaps?

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USNS GySgt. Fred W. Stockham (T-AK-3017) was waiting in the anchorage,possibly for a berth at GMD Bayonne. The vessel namesake had an interesting set of deployments.

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Icebreaker Penobscot Bay (WTGB-107) headed upriver a half month ago, but there was no imminent ice formation at that time, unless one traveled  well north of Inukjuak, but it would take some extraordinary turn-of-events for WTGB-107 to deploy there.

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The sixth boro has a number of these 29′ patrol craft.

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And to close out today’s post, USACE Moritz passes the evolving Rockefeller University campus expansion just north of the Queensboro Bridge.

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All photos in the past month by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s a short but motley set of photos.  Can you identify the tug below sporting the Canadian flag?  Answer follows.

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Below it’s Barry Silverton, pushing Fight ALS eastbound on the East River.   Big Allis identifies the location, where Don Jon folks/equipment have recently placed the platforms to the lower right side of the photo.

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And finally, from the Port of Toronto, it’s Mr. Kane, who first appeared on this blog here, although it is not identified except in the comments thanks to Isaac Pennock.

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So the top photo, it’s Cheyenne, quite possibly the last vessel to traverse the Erie Canal this season.  I’m not sure if they have already reached the Hudson River.  She’s flying the Canadian courtesy flag because she had just exited the Welland Canal at Port Weller at that time.  Here’s a photo taken by fire girl two seasons ago, Cheyenne doing the part of the Canal at the east end of Sylvan Beach.

Thanks much to George Haynes, Jonathan Steinman, and Jan van der Doe for these photos.

Happy Thanksgiving to all.  Thanks much for continuing to read tugster.  If there’s interest in the proposal below, I’ll try to fashion a post from your contributions soon if not tomorrow.

Proposal:  If you are working [today] Thursday and therefore having lunch and/or dinner at work–whether on a vessel or in any other work setting–and you choose to take a photo of the dinner–any aspect of the meal–and send it to me, please do and I’ll try to devise a post with it on Friday this week.  Thanks for the consideration.

I hope you’ve enjoyed the “whatzit” series as much as I do.  The photo below I took on October 22, 2016.  A minute or so earlier, I was thinking we were about to meet some traffic.  At this point I realized there were islands where I’d no recollection of seeing islands.  So what is it?

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Here’s a similar “island,” photo taken on November 14, 2016.  In the Thousand Islands, such a small island with at least three trees would not have been out of place, but here . . .   ?

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Until I saw this, and a few seconds later . . .

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this.   By the way, these photos were taken not far north of Saugerties.

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These camouflaged hunting platforms reminded me of some hunters we waked a few years back on Urger.  You can’t slow down if you don’t see the reason to.  Once we waked a few in a boat right along the bank–no photos because we didn’t see anything until we had passed by–we learned to “see” them and respond.

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Here are a few we spotted in time.

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We saw this guy, but he kept paddling madly as if to race us, all while keeping his face turned away.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who reiterates his suggestion from yesterday here:

“If you are working Thursday and therefore having lunch and/or dinner at work–whether on a vessel or in some other work setting–and you choose to take a photo of the dinner–any aspect of the meal–and send it to me, please do and I’ll try to devise a post with it on Friday this week.  Thanks for the consideration.”

On the cusp of wintriness if not winter per se, the Hudson Valley is spectacular.  Let’s start with Fred Johannsen pushing this crane barge northward.  That’s the Kingston-Rhinecliff Bridge aka George Clinton Memorial Bridge (DeWitt Clinton’s uncle)  in the distance.

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Here Treasure Coast urges Cement Transporter 7700–one I’ve never seen before–the last mile to the cement dock.

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This reflection was so magical, I needed to include this closer-up.

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Emerald Coast pushes a fuel barge downstream.

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Sarah D moves a motley pair of scows upstream.

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Eastern Dawn moves a fuel barge downstream.

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Mr Russell shifts a barge near the TZ Bridge.  What is in those tanks?

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Might that be Marion Moran pushing sugar barge Somerset up toward Yonkers?

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I believe this is Doris Moran moving cement barge Adelaide downriver.

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And as a last-but-not-least photo today, here’s Cornell conducting a TOAR sign off session.  Here’s a post I did three years ago with the same activity but using a different barge.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has a proposal below:

If you are working Thursday and therefore having lunch and/or dinner at work–whether on a vessel or in some other work setting–and you choose to take a photo of the dinner–any aspect of the meal–and send it to me, please do and I’ll try to devise a post with it on Friday this week.  Thanks for the consideration.

Also, you may be “choosing” ed out by now, but here’s a set of thoughtful, well-reasoned and -articulated perspectives on the Hudson anchorages question that is open to public discussion until early December.

Also, if you’re planning to be at the WorkBoat show in New Orleans next week,  I’ll be wandering around there, maybe looking for some extra work.  I hope to see you.

 

 

If Margot were a fish, I guess you’d classify her as catadromous, sort of.  And no tug that I’ve followed has switched between salt (where she was launched) and fresh (where she frequents as a working niche) water as often as Margot does.   Last week she was sixth boro bound and exiting the low side of lock 9.  Here’s a post I did almost two years ago about some very unusual bollards at the top side of lock 9.   But I digress.   Recognize the cargo on the barge?

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It’s a different barge, but those are two more fancy Canadian shoes–size 110-tons– for the legs of the NY Wheel, that repeat of what George Ferris built for the big Chicago fair in 1893.  And George Ferris . . . where did he get his inspiration to build such a wheel?  Well, it’s a Troy and Hudson Valley concept from the start, from Henry Burden and his industry.   Here’s a post I did in 2010 related to the dock Mr. Burden built upriver for his metal export.

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The lower Mohawk has a stark beauty this time of year, so different from its beauty in other seasons.

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I wonder why so many components of the NYWheel are sourced outside the US.  I guess I know, and it’s NOT my intention to make this a political post, and there’s no Jones Act for shore shoe/leg structures.

Bravo to the crew of Margot.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

. . . aka the leap between the seasons.  Call this photo, taken on Saturday dusk, the last moments of autumnal daylight.

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I was here waiting as a slight November blush lingered in the central NY trees, hoping this

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vessel, Sojourn, would pass before daylight faded and before those storm clouds caught up.

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She eased into the lock.  Some of you, I know, can guess this lock by the structure far left.

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And here at sunrise was a new season.  Winter isn’t just coming anymore.  It came in the night. By the way, thanks to Xtian’s comment here, I understand the significance of the registration numbers.

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Here the converted freighter eases into Lock 17, the highest lift lock in the Erie Canal system.

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Watch the descent.

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The gentleman below built this barge 53 years ago in Belgium, then used it to transport cargoes, including animal feed, through all the canals in the low countries, and in this case that included France and Germany too.  He’s riding along on the trip, his first visit to the United States.  Imagine the joy, being reunited with your handicraft in this way after a half century and halfway around the world!  His daughter, Maja, who was literally born on this barge and who as a kid jumped from hatch cover to hatch cover while the vessel–loaded to the coamings–was underway, is accompanying him.

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When the water level is lowered by almost 41′, the counterweight (almost) effortlessly raises the guillotine-style door.

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Click here to see photos I took of Urger from the same vantage point two years ago.

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And in the snow falling at a faster rate by the hour, Sojourn journeys eastward toward the Hudson.

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And from the road I took back to the sixth boro, here’s what has already accumulated east of the Hudson . . .

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All photos taken in the past 24 hours by Will Van Dorp.

For many other posts I’ve done about Dutch canal barges, click here.

 

Here are the previous posts in this series.

What’s unique about these photos is the season, the gray of November and absence of colors in the trees set off by the vibrant paint on Erie,

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the two Governors shown together here so that you can see the difference in paint scheme–Cleveland and

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Roosevelt, which different even

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in nameboard.

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Waterford, I’d guess, got too close to a dredge pumping operation.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

You may remember the Sojourn story here, about a Belgian freight barge that the original owner and builder sold, lost track of, and then rediscovered in upstate New York?  Here was how she arrived in upstate NY.

Well, after two years of work, she’s under way–just ahead of winter storm Argos.  These photos were taken yesterday (Thursday) by Bob Stopper up in Lyons, NY.  Below, Sojourn is easing not Lock 28A,

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heading for Lock 27, and

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and out of the canal before it closes, draw-down takes place, and ice invades.

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Calling all eastern Erie Canal watchers and Hudson River photographers, here’s Bob’s short background to the vessel:

“First arrived in Lyons on November 12, 2013 . The boat was built in 1963 and originally used as a coal and materials barge. It was used for over 40 years by the same family, but eventually because of family illness, the barge was sold. The barge was purchased by Paula Meehan, founder of Redken Cosmetics, renamed the Sojourn, and converted in 2006  to a Hotel Barge and used for high style cruises in France. Ms Redken shipped the barge via freighter to America with the intention of cruising American waters, especially the Erie Canal. Unfortunately, Ms Redkin died in 2014, and the barge returned to the Lyons Dydock on October 15, 2014. It sat  in the Lyons Drydock and began to deteriorate  until purchased by a young hi-tech  internet entrepreneur from the state of Washington. The newly renovated barge, 126′ x 18′,  left Lyons on November 17 headed for its new home in the NYC Harbor.”

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All photos by Bob Stopper.

You may recall that my connection with Lyons is that it’s the county seat of the county where I grew up.  It’s also the county where Grouper languishes, about to freeze into another canal winter.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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