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The first photo here comes thanks to Tony aka Phil.  Shelia Bordelon has been on this blog before;  I believe she has now left the area, mission accomplished.

Fugro Enterprise has been here before also, that time on a day that the red did not photograph well.  This morning she headed out to sea, mission ongoing, i believe.

Neptune (1977) is a first timer on this blog;  the past few days she’s been docked in Bayonne.  Since 1977, she’s had more names than  . . .   Steve Earle has had spouses!!  If you don’t know Earle, sample this.  I enjoy his music and don’t mean to disparage him, but he’s just been married a lot.

And finally, another from Tony aka Phil, Conti (2005) is a platform supply vessel that’s been in the New York Bight for some time now.

Thanks to Phil for sending along these photos.

For more specialized vessels like these featured on this blog, click here.  The exotics category overlaps somewhat here; click here for the exotics appearing on this blog.

 

JM, that’s John McCluskey, sent along these photos yesterday.  I’d planned on doing that same trip yesterday, but time got away from me and today it’s rainy and darker!

This shot greatly resembles one of the first set of photos I ever posted on a blog, my very first post. You can see it here.

Alice and two Oldendorff siblings have been sold to Algoma; hence the name change to Algoma Verity.

As John passed the shipyard in the old Brooklyn Navy yard, he also got photos of some of the other vessels there, like R/V Shearwater and in the graving dock behind her, Cape Avinoff.

 

Waiting her turn in the graving dock is Cape Ann.

Many thanks to John McCluskey for sharing these photos of a short stretch of his float-by on the East River.

 

 

Recognize the bridge and lighthouses?  A clue . . .  it’s on the freshwater coast of the US.

Here’s a continuation of the bridge above.  More importantly, you see the escort vessel in the background, none other than the venerable Neeskay, originally a 1953 Higgins T-boat and now the primary research vessel for UW Milwaukee, where these photos were taken.

The yellow vessel in the foreground above is an unmanned surface vessel produced by L3 Technologies.  Here’s more on the range of applications.

I’ve not noticed any yet, but I do keep my eyes peeled for USVs in bathymetric survey work in the sixth boro. Has anyone seen any?

Many thanks to Greg Stamatelakys, captain of Neeskay, for these photos.

 

What a treat to catch Dina Polaris on an daylight inbound run, and just before the April monsoons happen

She’s been working in the New York Bight for some time, and

I was hoping to see her.    Any guesses on maximum crew size? So her mission?

I’ll let you speculate until the end of this post.

By the way, my usage of exotic here comes from my birder’s guide, which defines an exotic bird as one well outside its usual range.  Imagine seeing a penguin in the sixth boro, or encountering a Chinese junk in our harbor;  when that does happen, it’s noteworthy.  Previous exotic posts can be found here.

These two crew rode atop the bridge all the way in . . . see the bright red jacket even on the top photo.

Bergen . . . in 1985 I visited there and it’s calling me back.

Above . . . no, it’s not a mini-container vessel.  I’m guessing she was core sampling for offshore wind.  See the full specs here.

Here’s more on the company, this vessel, and their other vessels.  Here’s an article about her from the Times, the Marthas Vineyard Times, that is. She is Turkish-built, 2017, from the Europe side of the Bosphorus.  She has berths for 97 crew!!

All photos taken by Will Van Dorp, who was happy to sit on my John Travolta bench again .

 

 

Here are the previous posts in this series.  So what is this?

It’s an ultra deepwater geotechnical drilling vessel.  It’s not drilling in the Upper Bay .  .  .

although it has the gear to do so.

With that helo pad above the wheelhouse, it looks to be what is associated with ports like Rio and Fourchon.

“Fugro”?  The name goes back to 1962:  “On 2 May 1962, Kees Joustra launches his own firm, whose name translates as Engineering Company for Foundation technology and Soil Mechanics, in short ‘Fugro’. ”

Above Fugro Explorer takes on fuel from Emerald Coast.  I was fortunate to get these photos–she’s been in and out of the harbor several times in the past half year–before she made through the East River bound for New Bedford, where she has now arrived.  She would have been a sight to behold on the East River, but omnipresence is not easy to manage, even in our sci-fi 2018 world.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s more on Fugro, “Ingenieursbureau voor Funderingstechniek en Grondmechanica.”  Fugro provided one of the vessels involved in the search for Malaysian Airlines Flight 370.

And speaking of sci-fi, I’ve recently immersed myself in augmented reality experiences

 

GWA stands “go[ing] west again,”  the next set of posts all attempting to catch myself and maybe you up, if you’re following along, with random and I hope interesting photos from the past almost three weeks.  I realize that catching up is impossible, and in this case while I had vacated the sixth boro, big stuff happened.

A word that comes to mind is protean– named for Proteus.  Type “define: protean” into google and you’ll appreciate why it’s difficult to catch up.  But here goes.

Within a half hour of departing Warren RI, we pass Naema and

Lionheart.  Do check the links.  Either would be worthy of a post in itself.

And still north of the Rte 138 bridge, we see NOAA R/V Henry B Bigelow.

On the cusp of Block Island Sound, we encounter inbound Atlantic Pioneer, where you’d expect her returning from a run. Here’s a post I did almost exactly two years ago when Atlantic Pioneer components still needed to be combined at the shipyard.

A bit further, it’s Carol Jean and Islander, both Block Island bound, although one will arrive much before the other.

By now, we’re into Long Island Sound and being overtaken by darkness.  That’s Atlantic Navigator II as a speck heading toward us.

This dawn photo found us within NYC and approaching the East river.  It’s Fort Totten, designed for the entire US by Robert E Lee.  Here could be a dilemma:  there’s no debate that I know of of striking his name from the credits for this fort.

We pass HuntsPoint Produce Market,

the floating pool,

Marty C–a Weeks tug I’ve never seen,

the “north end” of Roosevelt Island with the Blackwell Island Light,

Gabby L Miller pushing past Cornell Tech‘s yet-to-be used buildings,

the Brooklyn Navy yard with Asphalt Sailor and –I believe– the old Great Point,

swimmers in the water doing a Manhattan circumnatation,

and–let’s end it here for today–a yacht  named  Vava II.  Here’s info on her owner.

Protean  . . . day 1?  It’s not even over, and I think so.

Lots more to come.

 

Near the upper left corner is JFK airport and the barrier beach along the bottom is the city of Long Beach, NY. The map makes clear how much of the debris swept off the barrier beach called Long Beach  went into low lying marshes waiting to float off again at any higher tide and clutter the waterways through the green areas, the marshes of southwestern Long Island . . . not far from sixth boro waters.

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Here’s where the landing craft from yesterday’s post plays a role.  The vessel is now called Spartina, ex-Beach Comber, Eleanor S, and 56CM 751x one of 15 identical landing craft built in Marinette in 1977.

 

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The beauty of a landing craft is its shallow draft . . . .

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Note the debris piled near the waterway . . . by the marsh ‘uns. When the landing cart arrives for removal, it does need some water, but not that much and not a dock.

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If you have waders or are willing to get your feet wet,

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or if you pick the right spot in the waterway at the right tide . . .

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you can haul away what you would not want floating in the channel.

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Other workboats in the delta include survey boats looking for sunken boats and cars, and

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various and sundy other equipment moved by the tiniest of tugs.

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Can anyone identify this vessel CW 12?  I haven’t been able to yet.

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Many thanks to Josh Horton of Horton Dredge & Dock for the ride along.   I first met Josh at the Greenport workboat festival here and  here almost seven years ago.

Here are some other Sandy Aftermath posts.

All these photos come from bowsprite, who is known to scale the cliffs and trees of lower Manhattan to photograph and sketch the ships go by.  From auspicious time to time, she shares her photos with me, as she did recently.

Northbound . . . Stad Amsterdam in formation with a sludge tanker.

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This past Sunday she caught Topaz.  Some years back, I caught Skat, a yacht built by the same yard.

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Here and here were photos of Stad Amsterdam I’ve taken in recent years.

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The Intermarine vessel (Industrial Echo taken on April 6) is evidence of expansion of wind power generation upriver.  Thanks to David Silver for identifying the ship.

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In the foreground Gateway tug Bridgeport (Thanks for the help!)  and in the distance the all-knowing, never shrinking from difficult work Michele Jeanne.

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As we move through these photos, bowsprite must have descended the trees or cliffs, because here she’s incorporated early spring arboreal detail into her compositions . . . Gran Couva (with “lower” Jersey City) and

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Afrodite and Stad Amsterdam and

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Voge Freeway.

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For the current tip of bowsprite’s opus, click here.  For the most recent tugster post showing her work, click here.  Her photos clearly show the variety of large vessel traffic northbound between Manhattan and Jersey City/Hoboken.

I am grateful to bowsprite for her permission to use these photos.  To see and buy her work online, click here.

Thanks . . . for the social media sourcing of this vessel.  Nick Massa sent along these fotos of the Alpine Ocean Seismic Survey vessel Shearwater, which he took in another part of the sixth boro while I was clinging along the edge of Manhattan.  Nick does a blog called NYCruiseInfo.com, which I think complements tugster well.

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And in case you missed Xtian Herrou’s comment, he pointed out that Shearwater had an earlier life as a USCG surface effect ship.  Here’s more on that hull technology.  That reminded me of the term, which came up a few years back during the visit of a Norwegian minesweeper (third foto there) in the sixth boro.  Here’s more info on that vessel.   Here’s a post from last year of French vessels, thanks to Xtian.

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What does the track of a survey vessel look like?  Here’s the path Shearwater cut across the Lower Bay yesterday.

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So here’s my next group sourcing project.  I took this foto of Angel’s Share  Saturday but had no time to go to North Cove to get close-ups.  I had planned to do that early this morning, bt it appears she’s sailed off during the night.

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Angel’s Share is a 130′ Wally sailyacht.

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Unfinished group sourcing business . . . did anyone catch Iona McAllister  towing Amavisti into the port early on September 7.

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And finally, last but certainly not least . . .  Bob Stopper has some followups to stories I’ve been following on the Erie Canal.  First, details on that sinking on an otherwise quiet stretch of the Erie Canal . . .  here’s more info.  And a story I heard tug44 Fred mention numerous times while I was at the Roundup . . . Julia Holmes rowing the length of the Erie Canal in the 17′ dory she assembled in her Brooklyn apartment!  She’s more than halfway across the Canal already.

Thanks much for reading.  Special thanks to Nick for sending along the closer-ups of Shearwater and illustrating that social media is  . . . social!

 

 

Here was the first of this series, from over four years ago.  And what’s this?  whose wake prints?

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Answer?  It’s the flotilla assisting Hanjin San Francisco into Port Elizabeth.  Four months ago I caught San Fran outbound . . . here . . . scroll through.

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Let’s do an anatomy of wakes on a curve called Bergen Point.  That’s Marion Moran on the stern quarter, a New Jersey State Police boat overtaking on the port side.  Click here to see a now/then foto of Shooters, the island just beyond the container vessel.

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Marion clings, presses while moving “sideways” through the water.

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Laura K passes.

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In the same general time frame, surveyboat Michele Jeanne

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and lube tanker Emma Miller scribe the surface with their own signature, as

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does Ellen McAllister and as

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a commingling with

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Catherine Turecamo.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

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