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Summer haze and location compromise these photos, but in the interest of documenting specialty vessels that enter the sixth boro, I present to you . . .

Geoquip Saentis, a recently overhauled 2005 geotechnical drill vessel.  She was in the boro last year as well here.

She’s been working in a tight clutch with her fleet mate Geoquip Seehorn and Dina Polaris in one of the wind farm parcels.  

I believe Geoquip is a Swiss company;  no surprise then that this vessel is named Saentis, an 8200′ peak in northeastern Switzerland.  Seehorn is a peak in the Alps of similar height. 

 

All photos, such as they are, WVD.

 

The Deep Helder post could have been an exotic post, but I’ll wait to do that until it comes into the sixth boro, which it just may one of these days.

But Hammerfest as port of registry . . .  this may very well be the first time I see that registry on a vessel in the port.  No, “hammerfest” is not a party for carpenters or dulcimer players.

Here was the frontal view from Owl’s Head at sunrise yesterday morning.  Note the horizontal frame extending off the starboard side?

Here’s a closer look.  The white lettering on the side spells out REACH SUBSEA.  More on this contract here.

I’m guessing that cable runs to sensors/transponders of some sort or maybe an ROV.  Maybe a reader knows more about this.

Stril Explorer has been along the Ambrose Channel (not in) and along the shore of Bay Ridge to Sunset Park for over 24 hours now.

Note the “asterisk” icons running back from the bow . . .  she has three “thrusters,” unless I need to call them “positioning systems,”  providing station holding capacity rated at DP class 2.   She’s propelled by 4 x Cat 3516 run through 2 x Schottel drives. All the specs on this 251′ x 53′ 2010-built vessel can be read here.

She’s operated by MMT, a Swedish company founded by Ola Oskarsson.

If you follow her track between the VZ and the Sunset Park piers, you’ll see a half dozen curving but parallel and equidistant  lines.

As wind farm construction phrase approaches, we’re likely to see many more “exotic” vessels.

All photos, WVD.

Unrelated:  The 16000 teu, biggest ship yet on the East Coast US CMA CGM Marco Polo will arrive in the sixth boro at some time on May 20.  However, I won’t be here.  I’ll be far inland on higher elevations.  If anyone gets good photos and wants the (dubious) fortune and fame of having photos posted on tugster, please get in touch.  I’ll have some access to WIFI, so there may also be gaps in my posting, no DP class 2 position holding for me.

It’s the best season, as long as you stay on the water or near it . . . not in it.

Sailors come out of hibernation to catch some breezes.

Container ships head south to shuffle containers elsewhere.

Aggregate work goes on as it does all year round.

Shearwater continues to plumb the bottom terrain.

 

They all meet up somewhere…

 

 

but a better lens than mine catches it.

All photos, WVD, who loves springtime, when all the fish eggs are about to burst.

The photo below shows Neptune, a survey vessel doing wind farm related work.  It was first posted here in late July 2019.

As of Monday morning, this vessel has been anchored in Gravesend for over 24 hours.  Previously she was Neptune with that wilder paint job.  EGS loosely expands to “earth sciences & surveying” and a little bit of Latin will get you to ventus as wind, a fitting name for this heavily equipped and much renamed vessel that started out as an ice class fishing trawler way back in 1977.   From what I can tell, she fished until 2008.  Now she’s contributing to the most thorough surveying of the New York Bight and surrounding waters to the east that has ever been done.  I’d love to see some of the bathymetric images she and other exotics have generated in the past few years.

Fleetmate RV Ridley Scott sailed into the sixth boro a bit less than a year ago.

 

All photos, WVD.

 

What’s this?

I’m just trying to figure this out.  My best guess is that suspended from a 20-ton capacity A-frame is a set of underwater hands, a sampling device, a seafloor-drill, all tallied 14 tons of instruments  and tools in a seafloor frame. 

I can’t tell you the division of labor between the equipment lowered/raised through an approximately 10′ x 10′ moon pool by the 90′ derrick and the seafloor drill.  My guess is the the seafloor drill can function at great depth.   Note the Panamanian registry.

All those portlights . . .   relate to the 50+ crew the vessel can accommodate. 

The helideck . . . 62′ diameter, can accommodate helicopters of the Bell 412 type, i.e., up to about 3.5 tons. 

If you didn’t click on the equipment and specifications link earlier, my source for all I pretend to know here, you can click here now.  Since she was anchored in Gravesend Bay yesterday, the tide pushing her stern toward shore, I managed to get my first photos of her stern.   I have seen the vessel, working to amass wind farm bottom terrain data, several times since January 2018.   With the green light to transform South Brooklyn Marine Terminal into a dedicated wind farm construction hub, I suspect some interesting and exotic vessels will be transiting the Narrows in the next few years.

All photos and attempted interpretation, WVD.

Maybe a reader out there can explain how this equipment really works and what super-detailed examples of bathymetric chart of the New York Bight look like.

Having seen the forecast for December 25, I did my watch on Christmas eve.    These are the latest sunrises of the entire cycle . . . photo taken around 0745, and the sky was still reddish and offering very little light.   Fort McHenry and survey boat Christina cross. Yes, Christina . . . namesake you know who. 

Diane B was pushing John Blanche deep in the water with heating fuel.

Fort McHenry passes my station.

Ocean Endeavour was heading in ahead of the strong winds . . . or maybe just to be at the dock for Christmas.   Note the Staten Island ferry off her starboard and a tip of Twin Tube off port stern.

 

By now, it’s a little after 0800.

Twin Tube is the ultimate sixth boro Christmas boat;  there’s no Santa or reindeer, just a competent captain and enough horsepower to get alongside ships.

The reindeer . . . they’re atop the tarped salt pile.   Santa may have abandoned the sleigh, however.

All the above photos were taken before 0900.  The photo below. . .  it’s W. O. Decker, currently getting work done upriver, but ensconced between Wavertree and  work barge Progress a few years ago . .  .

All photos, WVD, who wishes you all Merry Christmas and gifts of life, health, and happiness however you find it.  And one more . .  . bravo to the Normandy crew for the decorations.

I caught this small open boat eastbound on the KVK.

She passed Ernest Campbell.  Clearly by her markings, she’s a survey vessel. 

Between traffic, they seemed to focus their work near the transition between the KVK and the ConHook Range . . .

returning to their area of interest, as I said, between traffic.

Work completed, they headed back west

from where they’d first come. 

That might be a cold job with minimal protection for employees of Aqua Survey Inc.  in

a crowded waterway . . .!

All photos, WVD.

It appears that Aqua-Survey Inc. (ASI) has another boat called RV Tesla, which I’d love to see.  I caught R. E. Hayes here over 10 years ago, also an ASI boat.

The smaller surprise was to see USCGC Beluga (WPB- 87325) traveling with speed from Sandy Hook into the Upper Bay. 

I don’t believe I’ve seen Beluga before, although she looks identical to the 70+ Protector class 87′ boats named for marine predators.  I didn’t realize that many marine predators existed, although once you start counting . . . they add up. More on parameters for replacing the WPBs here.

But what really surprised me was what Tony A mentioned about the blue/yellow vessel in the photo.  Of course, it’s R/VShearwater, the Alpine Ocean Seismic Survey boat that’s been creating a complex bathymetric picture of parts of the sixth boro.  I long thought she had an unusual design.  What I hadn’t known is

that she’s former USCG WSES-3.  WSES expands to “surface effects ships.”  Hull 1 of the WSES series, WSES-1, was built for the US Navy as 110BH, then modified and became USCGC Dorado, then back to the USN as SES-200 Sea Flyer, then IX-515.  That’s a lot of modification. More on that here (start near bottom of p 25) and here. For a photo of Shearwater, black hull and orange USCG stripe, click here.   For her Alpine tech specs, click here.

All photos, WVD, who enjoys learning from surprises.  Many thanks, Tony A.

If you’ve forgotten why I call these exotic, it comes from a bird book I have on the shelf.  Read about it here.

RV Ridley Scott Thomas came into the sixth boro yesterday, arriving here between Driftmaster, 1949–exotic in a different way–and the light, West Bank.

Here’s my question:  where and when was Ridley Thomas built?  Answer follows.  When I saw it, I wondered whether it had just left a shipyard for the first time.

Arriving yesterday after a nine-day trip from Curaçao, she had lots of folks on deck enjoying the beautiful Saturday morning.

Click here for more info on EGS, now a Hong Kong based company, and click here for info on her fleetmates. It turns out that one of her fleetmates is RV Bold Explorer, which some years ago you saw here as an EPA vessel named Bold. How her change of ownership came to be can be extrapolated here.

 

Sloop Puffin squeezes between Driftmaster and the research vessel.  Note the flag on the ridge?  It’s flag day today, and if you’re wondering how that started, click here.  I’m a fan of #6.  There are two US flags in this photo, one at the official site Fort Wadsworth, and another as courtesy flag flying from the mast of Thomas.

As of this writing, she’s still in over in Elizabethport.

 

All photos, WVD.   I’ve no idea why she’s in town, but for more on RV Ridley Thomas, click here.

And the answer to the questions . . . she was built in Singapore in 1981, first carrying the name Western Inlet.

Let’s start with one at Brooklyn GMD, thanks to Mike Abegg, whose previous photos can be seen here.  I’d seen NOAAS Hassler before, but I’d never realized she was a catamaran.  Might she be NOAA’s only large multi-hull?  And the horizontal inboard-pointing fins, I’d not expected those, although they may be standard stabilizers on a cat like this.  Her dimensions are 124′ x a broad 61′ x 12′, and you can find more info here.   As to location, notice WTC1 in the background.  Sharing the graving dock with Hassler is Timothy L. Reinauer.

I caught some shots of Alpine‘s RV Henry Hudson, yesterday in the

welcoming and balmy waters of Brooklyn.  Notice the single person standing in the park above?

 

Many thanks to Mike for sharing the Hassler photo;  the Hudson photos were taken by Will Van Dorp as she headed east in the East River in yesterday’s temperate December NYC weather, thermometer as evidence.

An interesting aspect of these two survey/research vessels is the fact that both namesakes are foreign.  Hassler, for a time, taught math at West Point.

Seeing these vessels also reminds me of the comparison of NOAA and NASA spending.

For a quite long but fascinating article on the unexplored majority portions of our own planet, click here. I’ve started but will finish reading it tonight.

 

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