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Technically the first vessel I saw–before dawn– in 2016 was Hudson River-built Jean Turecamo and then Surrie Moran, as they headed south to assist this outbound tanker, Kingcraft, which seems to be barely off the ways.

And once I spotted such a bright clean LNG vessel headed my way, my noirish self dissipates;  call me Marinus de Blauw.     Tugboat Jean Turecamo is off the starboard bow, whereas Surrie is invisible at the stern.   Parading behind are USCGC WPB 87361 Sea Horse and Vane’s Chatham.

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As it turned out, Kingcraft still had its USCG escort as it continued out the Thimble Shoals Channel of the CBBT, Morocco bound.

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From Island 1, to the north I could see a tug and barge headed southbound through the Chesapeake Channel between Island 3 and 4.

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It turned out to be Sea Robin towing  . . .

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Sugar Express . . . Florida bound, I presume.   Here’s more info on Sea Robin.

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And I include this next set as a jog-memory for myself:  at the Route 13 scenic area pull-off  in southern Kiptopeke, a look past the weirs I got a glimpse of a future destination . . .

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the concrete ships of the breakwater.

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I have to allow enough time to see them closer next time.

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More on the first twelve hours of 2016 tomorrow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Marginally related . . . concrete barges also languish on the Erie Canal.

Directly related . . . some previous posts featuring the Hampton Roads area are here, herehere, and here.

Differently marginally related:  Kingcraft–whatta name!!–is a new vessel;  Horizon Trader, seen in this sixth boro post from less than two years ago, is about to beach for the scrappers in India.

One of my (formerly) secret heroes is Guy Noir, secret because I may be revealing too much about myself in admitting that.  But life’s too short to care about drivel like that.   Noir has an office on the 20th floor of the Acme Building in a “city that knows how to keep its secrets,”  yet each week a different mysterious woman seems to find him in quest of a favor. So imagine this as a view from Noir’s Portsmouth VA office around 1600 hrs .  . . on the last night of the year.  It’s rainy but warm and all the creeks feeding into the estuary course in, with color and warmth of some old coffee  . . .  I was last here, though on the river then, about six weeks ago here.  And notice the hammerhead crane to the right.  Here’s

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the deal.  But I’ll come back to this history stuff later.

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For now, this is a record of the last night of the year, what my parents used to call “old years night.”

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In the fading light, there’s Michael J. McAllister, another McA (Nancy??) behind it, Camie, and a trio of Robbins Maritime minis called Thunder, Lightning, and Squall.  AND if you look carefully beyond the McAllister tugs, you’ll see Dann Ocean’s Neptune and the Colonna Shipyard, where a Staten Island ferry is being overhauled. Click here for previous posts referring to Colonna.

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In the driving rain as the last hours of the year ebb away, Vane tug Chatham heads south;  the oil must move . . . . even when the postal stream sleeps.

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Shadows . . . on a rainy night paint the river.   And under the “tent” inside

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And so ended 2015 for me . . . not a low-flying aircraft but a high flying window perch.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, private and public eye.

 

Really random means just that . . . and here are previous posts in the series.

So–thanks to Harry Thompson– let’s start with this assemblage . . . barge Amy B, Evelyn assist on the far side, but prominent is the 1941 Bushey built Jared S–ex-Cheyenne II, Sally Carroll, and Martin J. Kehoe.

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The closest I ever got to Jared S was here . . . about a mile in from the mouth of the Genesee River in October 2014.  See the white buoy 20 feet off the bow of the decrepit Spirit of Rochester . . .  that marks the hazard created by the sinking of Jared S.

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Also thanks to Harry, here’s a repost of Ocean Queen, cropped slightly tighter than I had two weeks ago . . . but check this link for the particulars.    In that link you learn that she sank after getting rammed near Hell Gate.  Well, thanks to

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Robert Silva, here are some photos of Ocean Queen after she was raised.

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You can see exactly where a bow struck her.   Thanks, Robert.

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I took the photo below last week in Boothbay, Maine, where I checked out the Tugboat Inn.  Of course, I needed to know the story, since the superstructure here looked authentic.  All the info I collected online and from the staff there said the boat was built in 1917–probably in New York–and worked all its life until 1973 in Maine waters as the tugboat Maine.  However, nowhere could I corroborate this.

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Thanks to Dave Boone, I received the photos below and learned a different narrative that seems plausible if you carefully compare the photo above with the one below.  The Boothbay pub was once the Richard J. Moran, built at Gibbs Gas Engine in Jacksonville in 1920.  Actually, it was built in Greenport NY in 1917 as Socony 3.  Then it became Maine and still later Richard J. Moran became the name.    Thanks again to Dave Boone for the correction.

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But was Richard J.  scrapped in 1950, as these databases say, or did it get renamed Maine at that point and then get transformed into a pub in the early 1970s? To be continued.

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The rest of the photos in this post I took last week.

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In Rockland on the hard, it’s the mid-1950s Kennebec, and she’s available.

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Dimensions are 41.9′ x 12.4.’

 

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Here’s the info, but she might be sold by now.

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Thanks to Harry, Robert, and Dave for vintage photos.  All other photos by Will Van Dorp.

And if you’re interested in collaboration, I invite your help for November posts.  All month long I hope to feature different ports–harbors–waterways and their workboats, which means not only towing vessels, but also ferries, fish boats, maintenance vessels, even yachts with professional crews.  I’ve been traveling a lot the past few months and have a fairly large backlog of boats from ports–harbors–waterways mostly in New England.  But as a social medium, this blog thrives on collaboration, so no matter which waters are near you,  I’m inviting you to send along photos of workboats from ports I might not get to.  I’d need at least three interesting photos to warrant a focus on a port.  Here are examples I’ve already done that illustrate what I’m thinking to do.

Photo from Nate Lopez.  Name that tug?  Here are some previous photos by Nate.

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Technically Ellsea is a freight ship.  The location for the next set of photos is the Acushnet River between New Bedford (background) and Fairhaven, where I spent the past week mostly incommunicado.  That’s the Palmers Island Light.  New Bedford, former whaling port and more and now the US top fish port?

 

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I don’t know the name of this vessel . . . might it be R. Marcel Roy?

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Here’s a profile shot.  Beyond her you see a portion of Tucker Roy’s tug named by subtraction as Co.

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And here, as seen from the Route 6 Bridge, it’s those two along with another mystery tug, which might be Pleon?

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Here, with interesting stern fendering, it’s Sea Fuels Marine’s Emma Nicole.

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Here’s a close up of the unusual fendering, and

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a clue to previous ownership.

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Now, in keeping with the colors of the unconfirmed Pleon above, let’s move way down east to Belfast, where I’ve also touched base recently.  It’s Capt. Mackintire.

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And rounding out this set, here’s the identification of Nate’s photo above, it’s Buckley McAllister fueling in New Bedford.

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I’m happy to be home . . . in time for the tugboat race tomorrow.   Don’t be late because the race runs at 10 . . .  with a parade before that.  Be there by 9.   I’ll be there.

 

 

This follows the post where I got to spend four times as long on Long Island Sound, a truly remarkable place.  The trip last week brought sights and surprises enough to warrant a repeat trip soon.  Here, a bait boat (?) passes a renowned Plum Island facility.  Back to this later in the post.

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We’re headed to New London, the name of this RORO/WOWO.

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Here Marjorie McAllister tows RTC 60 past Little Gull Light.

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The only house on Hobbs Island in Groton needed to have a story, and I found one when I learned it was built by the Hays family, who wrote this book a friend gave me for my 45th birthday.

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Here Mary Ellen departs New London for Orient Point, passing New London Light.

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Amistad awaits, for sale at the dock.

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Sea Jet  . . . takes on passengers for Block Island, a place I need to visit soon.

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Since our destination was Blount for the wind farm vessel ribbon cutting, I wanted to get a photo of the newly launched replacement for Capt. Log.   Click here to see the plans and specs.

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Chandra B, coming to the sixth boro soon.

At the dock just south of the I-95 bridge, it’s 100′ scalloper Chief, also for sale.

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Electric Boat 2 does patrols around the pens,

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which enclose a submarine.  Now look closely at the tail vertical stabilizer.  Now look at the one in this “news” story about a submarine getting stuck in Shinnecock Canal.  If not the same sub, then it’s at least the same type.

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But if you start thinking about it, Dan’s is having way too much fun.  This story and this one are clearly boaxes, spoofs about boats.  When I heard the story about Shinecock, I thought maybe the Hamptons PD had gotten ahold of this one, which I spotted on the North fork just a few summer months ago.

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Heading back across to Orient Point, you can line up New London Ledge Light with Race Rock Light, in the distance.   Tours for Ledge are available in the summer, when the ghost is around.

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On a leg between Newport and Oyster Bay, it’s KnickerbockerWisconsin-built by a shipyard that started out doing fish tugs!  If you’re not familiar with fish tugs–of which Urger was one–go to Harvey Hadland‘s site.

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Now here, back near Plum Island, is a surprise.  I figured it was a fishing party boat, but Justin suggested otherwise, and indeed he was right.  M. S. Shahan II IS a government boat, owned by Department of Homeland Security!!

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And a final shot of Plum Island just before we return to the Orient Point dock, of course, it’s Cape Henlopen, former USS LST 510

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By the way, I am still looking for folks with connection to this vessel as LST-510.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s the index.

Since I grew up in western New York and my grandparents lived 30 or so miles off to the right of this photo, crossing this bridge happened several times a year.  It was by far the biggest bridge in my world.   That’s Canada to the right.

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Baie Comeau (2013) upbound under the Thousand Islands Bridge

The bridge was completed in 1937, weeks ahead of schedule.  Canada, which appears to have no equivalent of the US-Jones Act, uses China-built vessels like Baie Comeau.  I saw a one-year-older sister here last October.

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Over in Kingston, I learned this vintage but functional crane today had been mounted on a barge and used in the Thousand Island Bridge construction back in the 1930s. There are several cranes of this design along the Erie Canal, some also still functional.  For one, check out the sixth photo here.

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In an archipelago called “thousand islands,” there’s need for lots of boats for commuting and transport.  Check out the lines of the white-hulled 25′ boat to the right.  Now check photos seven and eight in this post.  Spirit of Freeport is also a 25′ and it crossed the Atlantic!  A few more perspectives of Spirit of Freeport can be seen here, scroll through. To hear builder Al Grover, click here.

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Click here for info on Jolly Island.

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The proximity of Antique Boat Museum may draw classics here, wherever they might have been built.  Anyone identify the make?

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Vikingbank has an interesting bow.

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Clayton waterside with St. Mary’s steeple to the right.

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Check out the etymology of “delfzijl

R/V Seth Green is a fisheries research vessel based in Cape Vincent.  Last year I caught the christening of another Lake Ontario research vessel here.

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Wilf Seymour used to be M. Moran.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will add more photos from this watershed later.

Many thanks to Seaway Marine Group for conveyance.

 

On predicted weather days, you might be looking at charts while passing the waking hours, waiting.  And you might see unusual names . . . like Cholera Bank, about 10 miles out from

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Jones Inlet.  Why would someone name such a location after a plague gets explained here, and some statistics on numbers of deaths here.   Given that explanation, you might expect an Ebola Bank in the future . . . somewhere if not here.   But seeing

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this odd name on the chart recalled other odd names like these:  Bald Porcupine Island and Ile d’Amour off Maine, Pot Island off Connecticut, and North Dumpling Island, NY.  Then there’s Ono  (Oh no!) Island, Alabama, and of course one of my all-time favorites . . . Galivants Ferry, South Carolina, which prompted this detour (scroll through) some years back.

Speaking of gallivants, a friend in Netherlands sent me this photo yesterday as we hunkered down as Storm Juno approached.  The photo below shows a convoy of tugs towing inland barges navigating a track through the Schie, a waterway in Rotterdam, a place I visited when I gallivanted there last May.

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This is not exactly the same section of the Schie, but I’ve never shared these photos.

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Nor this one of feeder container vessel called Temptation passing under the Erasmusbrug.   If you want to see a beautiful 14-minute video of a restored century-old Dutch sailing vessel traversing the canal system between Delft and Rotterdam  . . . ending up near the Schie . . . click here.

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And since we are now many miles off our original course, what unusual or inexplicable charted or mapped names have you seen?  Please share some.

All photos, except for the black/white one and the bicycle one, by Will Van Dorp, who wonders who Jones was.

I’ll start with the greatest looking tug of all I saw.  It has a name, but I cropped it out and will reveal it as this post goes on.  But isn’t this a beaut?!!  It also has an evocative previous name.  Can you guess her vintage?

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I’m in the mood for puzzling today, so what’s this?  I know there’s no tug in this photo, but . . .

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now there is.  Check out the scale of those gift boxes!  Here’s the story of the Algiers Christmas bonfires. Scroll through here to photos 4 and 5 for last year’s Algier’s bonfire fuel.

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So here’s a closer up of the tug Bunker King passing the tanker Bow Trajectory, heading for Plaquemine.

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See the Algiers “gift boxes” over the stern of Cecilia B. Slatten?  See where she fits in her fleet here.   Can anyone explain what if any connections there are between Bisso Towing and Bisso Marine, who recently have had a project in NYC’s sixth boro?

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Freedom . . . there’s nothing in the sixth boro with these colors and artwork.

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M/V Magnolia . . . as night falls.

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Night falls on James Dale Robin and Kimberly Hidalgo.  Less than an hour earlier, prayers had been offered and champagne spilled over these two vessels and another, Dale Artigue.

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And nightfall means I should return to the beaut in the first photo . . . here it is with name restored, formerly called Havana Zephyr.  Check out this fabulous line drawing of her by Barry Griffin.

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Here’s the whole vessel as I saw it last week.  Such lines!  I’d really love to see a bowsprite rendering of those curves!

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Merlin Banta, which my defective eyes first read as ‘merlin santa,” came out of the St. Louis Boats yard in 1946, not long after the yard delivered a fleet of icebreaking tugs to the US Navy and then to the USSR!  If you click on no other links in this post, you have to see these icebreakers . . . last photo in a post I did a year ago here.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

0aaaa10aaaa20aaaa30aaaa40aaaa50aaaa6The stern reads “Syracuse of Syracuse.”  She’s built in Syracuse.  Two boats passing during the day, albeit a rainy one, is still a beautiful thing.

Photos were taken by Will Van Dorp between Palmyra and Newark.

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Two culverts not more than 50 miles apart, yesterday’s from 1832 and today’s from 1971.  And two vessels of roughly the same size and vintage.  Fritz, however is just out of detention in Toledo . . .

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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