You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘gallivant’ tag.

For some context, Road Fotos 2021 E left off in September here, and I’ve not caught up with road fotos for November.  But let’s jump ahead to December, and a trip we could start in New Iberia, about 150 miles west of New Orleans.  It was a reconnoitre, a gallivant to investigate what to spend more time on in a subsequent trip. More on that at the end of this post.

New Iberia is a low lying settlement, epicenter for the lift boat fleet.  Click here for an image taken after Hurricane Ike.

x

From the raised deck of a lift boat, I had this perspective on a ship yard across the waterway.

Some lift boats are for sale, others–like Jane below–in the yard for inspections, and

and still others are being dismantled, scrapped, like

the one that has these lift motors removed and possibly in triage for either recycling or rehabbing.

Heading by car for open water at Cypremort, we passed this church on stilts.  With greater time, I’d love to attend a service here.  With more time, Louisiana black bears might be spotted here.

I’d have to be there on a Sunday morning at 0900.

Taking the trip slightly out of order, let me add this moody photo bowsprite took from a low bridge over Bayou Black.  A thousand more photos like this would have reduced travel speed to a saunter pace. 

Here the intrepid bowsprite is recording the mosses in the trees, maybe collecting some for a multitexture project.

Like I said, I have many more;  selecting is tough, like this old tree.

The road and bridge system across this whole Atchafalaya region, half the area of the state, is quite impressive. The rest of these photos are thanks to bowsprite.

I love the higher bridges on these roads when less trafficked because they provide high points, great for taking photos, like this of the GIWW and other waterways of Louisiana looking west and

this, looking east.  With an entire other lifetime, I’d love to travel and explore this all the only way possible, by boat.

You may have heard of the disposal of the RORO Golden Ray, the car carrier that capsized outside Brunswick GA;  final cutting up is happening here, and over by the cranes, what you’re looking at is slices of the ship at M. A. R. S., Modern American Recycling Services in Bayou Black.

High bridges also facilitate a view of the an industry I’d not known was so visible this area, sugar cane production.  In the lower half of the photo, that’s a newly planted cane field.

Swaths of cane of different stages of growth were everywhere. 

In the foregound is newly planted, and beyond the machinery, that’s a crop ready to harvest with

large tracked machines like this. To see these machines at work, click here.

In large transports like this, you see the chopped cane

heading for the refinery.  This one below–the Enterprise mill— in steamy operation near New Iberia is one of many.  Definitely, a return trip would involve seeking permission to see all steps in this process closer up. 

Photos by bowsprite when indicated.  All others, WVD, who believes that you only halfway smell the daisies on the first time to determine what to spend more time at if and when you return.

 

Call this grand finale, third of three on Nola traffic . . .  but of course, that’s contrived; there is no finale except to my reporting.  Powered traffic has operated here since Roosevelt, the great grand uncle and aunt of TR,  Nicholas Roosevelt and Lydia Latrobe Roosevelt, their second arrival there in 1811!  I’d love to time travel back to join them on their first trip by flatboat and their second by steamer New Orleans.

I’d put money on a bet that Federal Crimson is going to load grain for export. The grain comes down river in barges pushed by the likes of Penny EcksteinPenny is part of the huge Marquette Transportation fleet, and at 4600+ hp, she’s one of the least powerful. 

 

The 2015 Crimson is part of the Montreal-based, foreign-flagged dry bulk fleet called FedNav.

Only recently have the old Algiers ferriesArmiger and Porteriere–been replaced by the sleek catamarans, including RTA  2.  In the link for RTA 2, there’s an unexpected SUNY Maritime connection.

Blanco is part of the huge Kirby inland fleet, approximately 250 tugs and over 1000 barges.

The 2012 Pan Unity, loaded along the big Muddy is on her way to the Mediterranean, and who knows where beyond that.

The 2012 Capt Niles Shoemaker comes from a shipyard in Bayou LaBatre.

Ensemble here was headed for Altamira MX, and has already departed there back to the US port of Houston.

Capes Kennedy and Knox have been at the ready here since 1996 and served post-Katrina.

I love the grand stairs here, and find I’m not the only person who frequents them as a platform.

The 1992 Capt. Bud Bisso has operated in these waters under that name since her launch.

Salvation, 2009, is another tugboat out of Bayou LaBatre.  Salvation is also a Marquette Transportation boat.

Creole Queen stays busy.

War Emblem has carried many liveries since 1982, including Kirby colors, but her current name is rather unusual. Her operator, Turn Services, operates over three dozen vessels.

I took photos of a sister of the 2017 tanker Stena Imprimis in the sixth boro, and I’ve yet to post them.  I AM remiss!

Mark Dougherty operates for ACBL has over 3500 barges and almost 200 towboats on the Mississippi. 

 

 

The 1981 Joseph Merrick Jones has been part of the Canal Barge Co. fleet almost since its launch.

All photos, WVD, who refuses to call this a finale of any sort since the river flows on, the boats traffic 365/24, and I hope to return soon. And although this blog may seem obsessive, I try to keep my own personal levees in place to confine that energy to recording vessel traffic on this blog.

Three 2022 calendars remain in the market stall at tugster tower, $20 each.  After they’re gone, I close the merch division for another 11 months.   If interested, email me your USPS address.

If they fly the flag, maybe they do the deeds, 

or maybe they had been too busy shrimping to notice what the deckhand ran up the mast.

Maybe they were just both at Journey’s End.

Lizzy B. Moran returned from an assist.

This unnamed trawler–I forgot to look at the transom because I was so distracted by the next traffic–might be doing a local run or could be ending the Great Loop just around the bend.  I just don’t know.

 

It is that season . .  and Silver Fox is festive.

 

 

Ships with memorable names head upstream.

Angus R. Cooper

and Mardi Gras are two of the local assist fleet too. 

All photos, WVD, who’s thinking to find a room down here, but I can’t gallivant back down until I sell the three more calendars I have left.

You might have known that I had the good fortune to gallivant most of last week, and it’s tough to gallivant without recording some images.   I took several hundred photos, and not only of boats and ships.  As with infants, humans in unfamiliar places detect patterns, familiar details.  

Pattern recognition kicked in when I glanced across the Mississippi toward the Algiers side and saw Bouchard colors, although a little digging yielded info that Robert J. Bouchard, name notwithstanding, is now a Centerline Logistics vessel.  I suppose she’ll be painted soon.  Robert J. has worked in the sixth boro, but the most recent time she appeared on this blog was over 12 years ago here.

Dann Ocean colors are also familiar, but the profile is as well.  Rodney is one of several formerly Moran boats dating from class of 1975.  Rodney at one time was Sheila Moran. Of that same class, Moran’s Heide is now Dann Ocean’s Helen and Moran’s Joan is now Dann Ocean’s Roseada.  There may be others I’m unaware of, like the barge Carolina.

 

“Diaspora” refers to those who depart from a location, and they should be distinguished from the incoming (I’m wondering if there’s a word for them more general than immigrant) .  And as I understand it, Courageous, downbound here a few days ago on the Mississippi, was on its delivery and will be arriving in the sixth boro early this week, maybe today.  I didn’t notice her on AIS, but FB reports her departing Charleston SC for the sixth boro yesterday, Sunday. She’s sister vessel to Commodore, involved in a mishap this past summer.

 

I’d never have guessed that Crescent’s Miriam Walmsley Cooper had a sixth boro connection, but a little digging shows the 1958 boat once worked in the boro as Harry M. Archer M. D., an FDNY  boat. Anyone have a photo of her in FDNY colors?  Was she single screw already then?

 

I saw a pattern in the photo below because another formerly huge Bouchard tug saw transformation in the same drydock, Donna J. Bouchard to Centerline’s Robin Marie.

As it turned out, this was the former Kim M. Bouchard, now to be Lynn M. Rose.  Her eventual appearance will match Susan Rose.

And it appears that next in line for rehab and transformation, Robert J. will become a Centerline vessel as well.

All photos last week, WVD, who is happy to be back in the boros, any of the six.

Gallivants are intended to stimulate change, a path forward for which I’m seeking.  How strange it was then when I exchanged business cards with a Nola gentleman yesterday and his card was in the form of a Tarot card;  it was Death, the Grim Reaper signifying imminent major change in one’s life.  The old has to die for rebirth to be possible, like with plants.

Speaking of change, the calendar year too is about to change and in preparation, I recently created a 2022 calendars, of which 15 are left for sale. I’m expecting the shipment will arrive at Tugster Tower shipping office today. More details later but if you’re interested, email me your interest and your address. Send no money at this time, please, but prices will likely be up a tad because, of course, (fill in the blank here with your favorite scapegoat).

Unrelated:  Grain de Sail is back in the boro, their third time calling here in less than a year.

Today I hope to return to the sixth boro safely.  I’ve not yet tallied my miles driven, but if you want to guess, I’ll let you know.  I saw a lot of trucks in those miles, some of them on pedestals, like this Diamond heavy wrecker along I-80 in western Iowa. I’m not sure if this is a Diamond T or a Diamond Reo.

This very backlit photo shows two trucks, one you likely don’t immediately notice lower right.  In the foreground, a Chevrolet–based on the cutout in the rear window–with a tow rig.

I managed to squeeze a bit of river and a towboat into this post . . . .  This Freightliner has backed down a ramp to transfer 7000 gallons of diesel to the tanks of the boat.

Here’s one I’ve not seen in a long time:  GM’s answer to the increasingly popular imports from Volkswagen, an early 1960s Corvair Greenbrier van.

In an eastern Nebraska town called Plattmouth, birthplace of Raymond Chandler, I spotted this pair–a 1920s tanker and a flatbed truck of the same vintage–as well as 

this Dodge Brothers tractor, again on a pedestal.

More recently, in a cornfield in central New York, these two pickups were part of the racing action.  I’ve many more photos from that event, should you be interested and should I need another distraction. I know some of you don’t do FB, but here’s a John Kucko Digital original that really captures racing on a drag strip in a corn field in Savannah NY.

All photos, WVD, who meets a big milestone soon. 

I had to leave the Missouri way too early, and will return as soon as possible.  For my last set from the roads of eastern Nebraska, let’s start with friendly boaters zipping downstream. 

Barges loaded with Iowa and Nebraska grain head south for the lower Mississippi and export.

Note the red floats on either side, safety lines I suspect in case of runaway.

Morning I stopped at a boat ramp near Brownville, population less than 500, where 

I stopped to see Captain Merriwether Lewis, a USACE dredge

one of the last surviving vessels from the (relative) straightening of the Missouri beginning in the 1930s.

She was the result of a 1920s infrastructure project we still benefit from today, and is currently a museum I could not wait around to see.  Well, next time.

Driving back to the Phelps City MO side of the river, I saw the perfect illustration of the advantage of barging.  The white trailer extreme right below is 

the first white trailer to the left here below . . . .   All those trucks headed to the elevator would

NOT fill even half a Missouri/Mississippi River barge.

All photos/choices/sentiments, WVD, who needs to get back here.  Events compelled me back over the Mississippi too soon and back to NYS.

 

My goal was familiarization, not veni vidi vici, or exploration of the 2300+ miles of river crossing parts of seven states, beginning in SW Montana.

Barge traffic is possible there now because of the work of the USACE.  More on that in a later post.

Here was my top-priority destination:  the current northernmost aka upriver port.  more on that later too. 

The above port is 50 miles north of Omaha and on the Iowa side.  So is Omaha connected to salt water . . .  indeed.

There’s a story here and here. . .  about a beaver and a business opportunity.

Now in the sixth boro, boats like the one above never worked, not so on the Missouri.  If you’ve ever following the Missouri and see a sign about the “steamboat exhibit” at DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge, by all means, check it out. 

 

250,000 artifacts including 1860s steam technology have been excavated, cleaned/preserved, and nicely displayed.

It turns out there’s another steamboat wreck exhibit in Kansas City, which I took no time to check out, but I will next trip. Of note, both Bertrand and Arabia were built along the Ohio river, far to the east.

As to the question of current commercial activity north of Kansas City . . . it’s there.

If you’ve never read River Horse, a boat trip from the sixth boro’s Elizabeth NJ to Astoria OR, check it out.  I’m eager to re-read Moon’s account of his navigation of his boat through this geography.  Recently, I re-read his account of transiting the Erie Canal and encountering tug Urger and its erstwhile captain Meyer.

By the way, Urger will be featured in tomorrow’s post.

All photos, observations, WVD, who is back east of the Mississippi and catching up.

Again . .  greatly abridged . . . it took the two-lane most of the way across Iowa–included a fuel stop in Pella— from the Mississippi to the Missouri, although from Des Moines westward, I did take I-80, where a fleet of windmill parts was parked in a long rest area. 

 

I got back on the two-lane again to get to my river port destination.  The high-rises here are grain elevators, and small towns sometimes grow up with services around them. 

I got as far north as Sioux City, when I needed to turn south again.  The rest of this long river has to be postponed for the next trip, since what drove this trip is work, which I’ll hold off on explaining.  

But you can’t be here without countless references to the Lewis and Clark gallivant, a wandering westward at the behest and on the payroll of the United States.  

Near Blue Lake, a state park features a set of replicas of the vessels of the expedition.  

The centerpiece is their keeled boat/barge/mothership Best Friend.  Can you imagine poling, rowing, and towing this behemoth?!!

 

As I said, earlier, the northern areas of this river, South Dakota upstream to Montana, must wait for the next expedition/gallivant.

All photos, WVD. 

 

Road Fotos never tell the whole story, but enjoy these fleeting sights from the Mississippi Valley . . . like an excursion boat called Tom Sawyer

or one called Mark Twain . . ..

Some towns have statues of obscure favored and maybe local folks . . .

but no such unknowns are raised onto a pedestal in Hannibal. Is there anywhere in the US a writer as universally known and recognized as Mr. Clemens?

I’m sorry never to have met him.

Let me be uncharacteristic, and add a bit about my visit here.  After some trouble I’ll not elaborate on in Saint Louis, I was driving north along the Mississippi.  After some debate with myself, I pulled into Hannibal, found a room, took a shower, and walked around town looking for some food.  The BBQ place had moved out to the highway (Highway 61 !), so I walked on and found a Turkish place, right next to the farmer’s market where I bought some pears.  This Turkish place…  I sat outside, where a cat of the feline sort joined me.  The waitress had no voice but was very charming and wondered why anyone would visit Hannibal.  I’ll get back to that.  After a delightful and delicious meal, I paid up and walked out onto the deserted street, or I thought it was a deserted street.  Two deer, who seemed to be out exploring, met me.  We chatted and then went our separate ways.

Why would anyone visit Hannibal?!!  

Are you kidding me?  

I’d go back.  I highly recommend a visit to Hannibal, although I can’t guarantee you’ll meet the deer, the cat named Isabel, or the waitress with no voice.

All photos, WVD, who is now out of my personal WiFi desert.

I’d hoped to catch this boat in the NYS Canals, but . . .   Going by the adage of  . . “if the mountain fails to come to you, you go . . .”  here’s this.

Sneak preview then of J. Arnold Witte, taken yesterday on my way west.

The first boat by this name . . .

she’s 78′ by 26′ and I believe triple screw….

 

 

All photos, WVD.

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,506 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

January 2022
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31