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Here are the previous ones.

One of the joys of driving is the serendipity–even if guided . . . thanks, GT–of noticing the entirely unexpected, like the device below.  Any ideas?  If GT hadn’t mentioned this, I probably would not have thought twice about this weathered industrial object.  And it’s for sale.  For the right price, it can be on your boat.

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A clue is that the device above is located geographically between the tin building below and Boston, where this road trip ends.   The tin building is Gallery 53 on Rocky Neck.  I’m guessing it once had a seafood related purpose.

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A bit down the coast is Salem.  The brick building with cupola in the distance is the old Custom House, where Nathaniel Hawthorne once worked.

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I had forgotten that this replica is Hudson River built. There was a trade with China already 200 years ago.

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I’ll have to come back to the North Shore when all these vessels–Adventure, Friendship, and Fame–are sailing.

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Continuing southward . . . we arrive in East Boston, and Jake.

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Here’s another device on a rooftop.  Fiat Topolino?

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If you know the area, you’ll guess I’ve been heading south on 1A, and now I’ve parked and am walking over the McArdelle Bridge.  Anyone know anything about that red vessel that looks a bit like Augie?

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My tour of Luna recently is what lured me to this area around Chelsea Creek.  Here’s Luna resplendent.

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Anyone know the story of JW Powell?

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And the red and the white sailing vessels farthest from the camera here?

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Over yonder is Aegean Sea, formerly of the seas of the sixth boro.

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This bullnose will likely never again see the water.

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And here we are at the end of this stretch of road . . . it’s Roxbury High Fort aka the Cochituate Standpipe.

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So here we are . . . it’s a whistle from the SS United States!  Are there any developments in her refurbishing?  For some interior shots of her I took two years ago, click here.   Here are some other photos taken on the SS United States.

As to the particulars on the whistle, here’s what I learned this morning from SW:  “The whistle from the United States is a Leslie Tyfon, size 300DVE-5.  [Click on that link to hear one of these.]  It was purchased in 1986 by my uncle at auction I believe through Marine Technologies  Brokerage Corp. out of N.Y.   We have a letter of authenticity and it is currently for sale to the best offer.  Last recorded offer was $10,000.00.  We feel it is much more valuable.  It was on of three steam whistles from the forward stack of the ocean liner.  My uncle purchased the large forward whistle.  Thanks for your curiosity.”

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All photos taken by Will Van Dorp.

Many thanks to GT for the heads up and to Steve for the info on whistle.

Visiting Gloucester for me is always restorative.  Here are a few more photos I took Saturday and Sunday of

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Artemis, 

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Full Moon, 

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and Adventure.  That’s a great sequence of names!

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Last fall she was sailing with some food cargo here.  And if I had an editor, that editor would be unhappy, because yesterday I suggested I’d seen Adventure in Boothbay last October.  Mea culpa  . . . I saw Ernestina!  Click here for a fairly active blog with updates on the work on Ernestina.

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Lady Jane and

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Ardelle .  .  . have fishing origins.  Ardelle is of course the older design but a much newer boat, and I DID see her in Boothbay, off the stern of Ernrstina.

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Ardelle touched the water in summer of 2011.  See some of her history here.

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When I took these photos of other pinky schooners in Essex in November 2009, Ardelle existed (maybe) only in plans.

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I’m not sure where Maine and Essex are today–maybe right here–but as much as I enjoy seeing hulls out of the water, I’d rather see them afloat and underway.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has photos of yet another pinky tomorrow.

For more traditional vessels of Gloucester, see Paul’s post here.

Way too many years ago I made a trip back to Gloucester, as posted about here.  So I went back this weekend, had long talks with a few people, but of course that means I didn’t see all the people I would have liked to.  And although putting up these photos seems like walking on a concrete slab before it’s set, here I go, premature or not.

It’s the old 1952 Blue Ocean alongside some newer yachts.  This is the transition in Gloucester.

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Here’s looking south toward Rocky Neck.  From left, it’s lobster boat Blivy Fish, Fort Point, and Disch’s old Dredge No. 200.   Click here for a post I did in 2009 showing the No. 200 in the KVK.  After the company owner died, the Disch equipment was auctioned off to the four winds.  One of Disch’s small tugs is on the Lake Erie now.  Fort Point used to be Patrick J. Hunt.

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Waiting to go back in soon are Irish Piper and UB88, whose story you can find here on the GMG site.  More on GMG a little later.

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F. H. Lane used to paint this scene.  Near the left, you see Our Lady of the Good Voyage, but lower,  more left I see a pinky stern and some interesting vessels made to the prominent dock.  Adventure‘s returned from Boothbay, where I saw both the black-hulled schooner and the pinky here.  More on these tomorrow.

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Here’s the reciprocal shot, showing the bow of Adventure, which has a 90th year gala coming up in less than a month,  and a closer-up of the old motor life boat.  Anyone tell anything about her?  I know someone who probably can. Here’s another set of rebuilds.

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This mystery life boat looks quite original.

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Here’s Wanderbird with a schooner tied alongside.  Unicorn?  If so, did she ever sell?  Is Wanderbird for sale?  Also there, Lisa Ann III and Full Moon.  Overkill‘s in there too.

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This beauty aint telling, nothing.

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Here’s some info on Ardelle.

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And here’s the home base for many things in Gloucester, including lobsters and community.  Cheers, Joey C. and GMG . . . Good Morning Gloucester.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Back in 1987, I took a leave from work (nearby in Newburyport) one morning to see a large Soviet factory ship that had finally been granted permission for shore leave in Gloucester after working offshore for months.  Here’s an article about that time.  Does anyone have photos to share of that?  I recall the chill I got seeing the hammer and sickle on the stack as she was tied up behind Gortons. I didn’t carry a camera much back then.

So let’s go inland a ways and look around.  I actually want to make the point that even in the smaller interior cities the water connection is strong.

See Amsterdam on the left? Slightly northeast all the way across the map, you see a city called Zwolle.  To drive from Amsterdam to Zwolle is about 60 miles.  And that “island” you see in between the two cities is actually reclaimed land, a polder that used to be the bottom on the Zuider Zee.  That particular polder is called Flevoland, but I digress.

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Today’s post focuses on Zwolle, a city about the same size as Leiden.  Its name actually comes from the same word that in English is “swollen.” But more on that later.  Once again, notice the moat, i.e., water and therefore boats.

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All kinds of boats, and incentives for tourist-attracting traditional boats lining the moat.

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Enclosed by the moat was once a walled city.  Here’s a remnant of the wall;  notice the reddish-hulled vessel under the flags to the right.

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Below is looking through the arch which is visible on the left side of the photo above.  The tower in the wall holds . . . what else, an Italian restaurant.  A throwback to the Romans who managed to get behind enemy lines back in in “barbarian” times?   That’s a joke.

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Let’s jump across the moat and see this from the outside.  That boat is called “de verhalenboot,” which translates as “the story boat.”  Here’s a googletranslated version of their site.  They have a matching tender.

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Here, notice the “story boat” in the center?  To the left is the “pannenkoeken boot,”  i.e., a restaurant boat noted for its pancakes.  I posted about them in Amsterdam two years ago here.

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I.e., lots of specialized vessels, starting with freight carrier repurposed as houseboats,

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as well as modern houseboats fitted onto barges.

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Note the grand piano to the left of this gray/white vessel?

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There’s the piano again to the extreme right.  It’s landside of Thor, cultuurschip.  Here’s the googletranslated version of their webpage; their 2016 season just started.  This is Zwolle’s version of the sixth boro’s barge music, here and here. To orient you, that’s the “story boat” just beyond the vessel to Thor‘s stern.

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So there’s pancakes, stories, music . . . and a pink “love you long time” craft that for 13 euros, gets you a guide, a drink, snacks, and a ride around the moat.

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Here’s more of their flotilla and their translated page.  Dutch and English are not that different:  translate this as “cook boat.”

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And as you travel around the moat, you see lots of old buildings like this one, lots here with

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names in painted (?) terra-cotta.

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In the center of town, there’s the “keep,” technically, Sassenpoort.

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Of course, my nose is really for workboats, Harm and Harm 2, small tankers for the local Shell distributor.

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Here, you see the sail maker’s shop, also selling “water sports articles” and built into the old city wall.  And here’s my holy grail . . . the 1942 small tug named Kees.   Kees is a very common name for males in Dutch.

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As is true for over-the-road trucks in the US, many Dutch vessels carry owner info on a placard forward of the wheelhouse.

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A similar but more primitive looking vessel here is Ceuvel.  Other than that this boat was likely built in an area of Amsterdam called Ceuvel, I know nothing.

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Let’s end here today with a shot of her from the stern.

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More photos tomorrow from another small city in NL, this region of water as seen here and here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’d love to hear from the owners of any of these vessels and/or see building plans.

 

Let’s stay in Leiden for two more posts. Here’s a 3:32 minute time lapse showing the city, about the same size population as Elizabeth NJ.

The Dutch seem to understand the touristic attraction of old boats, making available–I was told–free docking for vessels fitting certain parameters of restoration. They’re yachts, no longer work boats although they COULD do light work.    I wandered until I located the docks for old tugboats.  This “block” is about 1000′ north of the one we saw yesterday here, just south of the first “o” in “Noorderkwartier” in the map below.

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From a bridge looking east, we see the 1916 Amor first in line and she’s for sale (“te koop“).

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Then looking north from the same spot, that’s Gerda on the left and Alba on the right.  We’ll get back to Alba at the end of this post.

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Here’s a side view of Gerda, about which I found no information.

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Let’s walk northward along the land side of photo above, Oude Herengracht Straat.   The third boat back in the photo above is Lodewijck, 

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a 1927 build.

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Notice her towing hook.

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This one, Grietje, two farther northward along the right side of the photo #2 above.

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Notice her pelican hook for towing.

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Behind her is Obsessie, dating from 1925.  Click here for an incomplete alphabetical listing of the restored tugboat fleet, aka motorsleepboot vloot.

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Here she is as seen from the other side of the canal.

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Jan dates from 1920.

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Here were are on the other side looking at the first in line in photo #2 above.  Alba is a beauty that dates from 1911.  Click here for another set of her.

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These and others–actual steam vessels–will make their way through the waterways to events like this one in late May.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will post about a different historic vessels “block” in Leiden tomorrow.

 

I’m back at the helm and have switched the robots off.  I’ve been in Netherlands (Nederland, in the language), which translates as “low lands.”  Where it’s low, you find water, of course, and where you have water, you’ll find boats and bridges.

You also find moats.  See the jagged blue rectangle in map below showing the center–the historical starting point–of the city of Leiden, a city of 122,000 midwayish between Rotterdam and Amsterdam.  All the photos in this post show one” block” of the Nieuwe Rijn (New Rhine), attached to the Oude (old) Rijn.   In fact, the Nieuwe Rijn (NR) is only a little over a mile channelized portion of the Oude Rijn, a 30-mile stretch of river no longer attached to the Rhine, the 750-mile river that everyone knows.  Think oxbow lakes along the Mississippi, only straight.

Imagine the blue rectangle as a clock;  you locate this one-block area on the map below at around the 4:00 position of the moat, at the intersection of the NR and the Herrengracht, a main vertical canal you can see there.

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At this intersection there’s this old fuel barge.

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I don’t know if it still functions.

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Here’s the real focus of this post, low airdraft tugs like Jason.  The wheelhouse roof and windows are hinged, as you can see in this short video where Jason tows a barge through one of these low bridges.

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See the blue/white sign near the left center;  it reads “Herrengracht.”  I love the paint job on that Smart.

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The blue tour boats are operated by a company called “bootjes en broodjes,” or small boats and rolls.

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Eat. Drink. Tour.   Also, learn about Leiden.  Talk.  Duck!

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And among low air draft tugs in this block of waterway, here’s the real focus, the tug on the waterside of the small covered barge is called Triton.

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Notice the fuel barge and Jason?   In a lot of places in the waterways in Leiden, those smooth but curved top barges have seating on them as bars and restaurants.

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Here’s Triton with a house to get out of the weather.  She’s 100 years old exactly, a mere youngster compared with the buildings surrounding the waterways.

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Triton reminds me a lot of Augie and Heidi.

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Now if the spelling “rijn” seemed familiar, think of this guy . . . a favorite son whom we all know by his first name, Rembrandt.

Many more Dutch photos to come;  remember this is just one block of waterway. All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

The name on the bow of the vessel to the left says “Boston Pilot,” but that’s just a name.  The real Boston Pilot Boats are shown in this short youtube video. See more stills here.

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MV Fintry was originally built for the British Royal Navy.  Since then, she has undergone conversion to an expedition yacht, as seen here.   Click here to see the boats not chosen for this project.

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Harbor Fuels delivers fuel around the harbor with a barge pushed by a tug with a great name, Bumper.

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Now here’s an interesting story, a boat developed by a treasure hunter, who seems to be in a sea of trouble, as described by this article. 

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This is the sub that was to be used to salvage over $1 billion worth of platinum from SS Port Nicholson, if that cargo was actually on board. Sub Sea Research still has a website, here.

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Face-off . . . well actually Justice is assisting WMEC 903 Harriet Lane out of port.  That’s the Bunker Hill monument in the distance.  Justice is a Tacoma-built 5400 hp tug.

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Does anyone know whether Justice traveled to the East Coast under her own power?

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Here’s the USCG history of the name Harriet Lane.  Ms. Lane was a US First Lady who was NOT married to POTUS.  If you want more info, click here.

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Freedom is a Justice‘s slightly smaller 4400 hp cousin.  Freedom and her twin–Liberty–were both launched by Washburn & Doughty in the first half of 2003.   For photos of Liberty at work back in 2009, click here and here.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Technically the first vessel I saw–before dawn– in 2016 was Hudson River-built Jean Turecamo and then Surrie Moran, as they headed south to assist this outbound tanker, Kingcraft, which seems to be barely off the ways.

And once I spotted such a bright clean LNG vessel headed my way, my noirish self dissipates;  call me Marinus de Blauw.     Tugboat Jean Turecamo is off the starboard bow, whereas Surrie is invisible at the stern.   Parading behind are USCGC WPB 87361 Sea Horse and Vane’s Chatham.

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As it turned out, Kingcraft still had its USCG escort as it continued out the Thimble Shoals Channel of the CBBT, Morocco bound.

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From Island 1, to the north I could see a tug and barge headed southbound through the Chesapeake Channel between Island 3 and 4.

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It turned out to be Sea Robin towing  . . .

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Sugar Express . . . Florida bound, I presume.   Here’s more info on Sea Robin.

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And I include this next set as a jog-memory for myself:  at the Route 13 scenic area pull-off  in southern Kiptopeke, a look past the weirs I got a glimpse of a future destination . . .

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the concrete ships of the breakwater.

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I have to allow enough time to see them closer next time.

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More on the first twelve hours of 2016 tomorrow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Marginally related . . . concrete barges also languish on the Erie Canal.

Directly related . . . some previous posts featuring the Hampton Roads area are here, herehere, and here.

Differently marginally related:  Kingcraft–whatta name!!–is a new vessel;  Horizon Trader, seen in this sixth boro post from less than two years ago, is about to beach for the scrappers in India.

One of my (formerly) secret heroes is Guy Noir, secret because I may be revealing too much about myself in admitting that.  But life’s too short to care about drivel like that.   Noir has an office on the 20th floor of the Acme Building in a “city that knows how to keep its secrets,”  yet each week a different mysterious woman seems to find him in quest of a favor. So imagine this as a view from Noir’s Portsmouth VA office around 1600 hrs .  . . on the last night of the year.  It’s rainy but warm and all the creeks feeding into the estuary course in, with color and warmth of some old coffee  . . .  I was last here, though on the river then, about six weeks ago here.  And notice the hammerhead crane to the right.  Here’s

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the deal.  But I’ll come back to this history stuff later.

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For now, this is a record of the last night of the year, what my parents used to call “old years night.”

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In the fading light, there’s Michael J. McAllister, another McA (Nancy??) behind it, Camie, and a trio of Robbins Maritime minis called Thunder, Lightning, and Squall.  AND if you look carefully beyond the McAllister tugs, you’ll see Dann Ocean’s Neptune and the Colonna Shipyard, where a Staten Island ferry is being overhauled. Click here for previous posts referring to Colonna.

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In the driving rain as the last hours of the year ebb away, Vane tug Chatham heads south;  the oil must move . . . . even when the postal stream sleeps.

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Shadows . . . on a rainy night paint the river.   And under the “tent” inside

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And so ended 2015 for me . . . not a low-flying aircraft but a high flying window perch.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, private and public eye.

 

Really random means just that . . . and here are previous posts in the series.

So–thanks to Harry Thompson– let’s start with this assemblage . . . barge Amy B, Evelyn assist on the far side, but prominent is the 1941 Bushey built Jared S–ex-Cheyenne II, Sally Carroll, and Martin J. Kehoe.

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The closest I ever got to Jared S was here . . . about a mile in from the mouth of the Genesee River in October 2014.  See the white buoy 20 feet off the bow of the decrepit Spirit of Rochester . . .  that marks the hazard created by the sinking of Jared S.

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Also thanks to Harry, here’s a repost of Ocean Queen, cropped slightly tighter than I had two weeks ago . . . but check this link for the particulars.    In that link you learn that she sank after getting rammed near Hell Gate.  Well, thanks to

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Robert Silva, here are some photos of Ocean Queen after she was raised.

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You can see exactly where a bow struck her.   Thanks, Robert.

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I took the photo below last week in Boothbay, Maine, where I checked out the Tugboat Inn.  Of course, I needed to know the story, since the superstructure here looked authentic.  All the info I collected online and from the staff there said the boat was built in 1917–probably in New York–and worked all its life until 1973 in Maine waters as the tugboat Maine.  However, nowhere could I corroborate this.

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Thanks to Dave Boone, I received the photos below and learned a different narrative that seems plausible if you carefully compare the photo above with the one below.  The Boothbay pub was once the Richard J. Moran, built at Gibbs Gas Engine in Jacksonville in 1920.  Actually, it was built in Greenport NY in 1917 as Socony 3.  Then it became Maine and still later Richard J. Moran became the name.    Thanks again to Dave Boone for the correction.

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But was Richard J.  scrapped in 1950, as these databases say, or did it get renamed Maine at that point and then get transformed into a pub in the early 1970s? To be continued.

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The rest of the photos in this post I took last week.

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In Rockland on the hard, it’s the mid-1950s Kennebec, and she’s available.

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Dimensions are 41.9′ x 12.4.’

 

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Here’s the info, but she might be sold by now.

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Thanks to Harry, Robert, and Dave for vintage photos.  All other photos by Will Van Dorp.

And if you’re interested in collaboration, I invite your help for November posts.  All month long I hope to feature different ports–harbors–waterways and their workboats, which means not only towing vessels, but also ferries, fish boats, maintenance vessels, even yachts with professional crews.  I’ve been traveling a lot the past few months and have a fairly large backlog of boats from ports–harbors–waterways mostly in New England.  But as a social medium, this blog thrives on collaboration, so no matter which waters are near you,  I’m inviting you to send along photos of workboats from ports I might not get to.  I’d need at least three interesting photos to warrant a focus on a port.  Here are examples I’ve already done that illustrate what I’m thinking to do.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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