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Norfolk and its estuary constitute a major US seaport, so let’s linger here for this post.  I’ve been there three times, and only once was it clear.

Besides military docks, it has a number of terminals.  for this latter, here‘s a schedule;  Notice it shows CMA CGM Marco Polo arriving here at 1300 on May 23. 

Clayton W. Moran is a 2016 launched 6000 hp tugboat, just a bit newer than the four 6000s in the sixth boro.

Compared with the sixth boro, notice that you see many of the same companies working in Norfolk, and many of the same vessels, including container ships tugboats.  Choptank is a 2006 Louisiana-built Vane 4200 hp boat.

The sixth boro has quite a Norfolk tugs fleet, but I suspect Ellie J, 1968 and 1800 hp, has never called up here.

I can’t tell you much about Dauntless II.

Emily Anne McAllister is a 2003 4650 hp tugboat.

Gold Coast is a 1967 1000 hp tugboat that has worn Dann Marine colors since 2005.

Captain Mac is a Corman Marine Construction tug built in 1980 and rated at 700 hp.

Steven McAllister is one of a dozen or so McAllister converted YTBs.  Built in 1963 and significantly repowered in 2007, she brings 4000 hp to ship assists.  She’s pretty much identical to Ellen McAllister.

Elizabeth Ann is part of the Norfolk Dredging fleet;  she’s from 1982 and is rated at 3000 hp.

Ocean Endeavor is from 1966, 1000 hp, and has left saltwater for Milwaukee, where she’s now Ruth Lucille.

Paradise Creek (1981) once worked in the sixth boro as Caspian Sea and before that (and before my time) was here as Sea Tiger.  Currently, it has been sold out of the Vane fleet and is known as Emmy Lou.

Maxwell Paul Moran is a 6000 hp, likely quite similar to Clayton W above.

All photos, WVD.

 

I’ve traveled the ICW from Charleston SC to NYC, some parts several times.  This is a “revisit”  focusing solely on tugboats. I’ll start in Charleston with Elizabeth Turecamo in the fog.

Recycling comments on the boats below from Georgetown SC, by George Schneider:  “The little one shows the name Laura , which has one of two possible origins: A 45-foot tug by the Equitable Equipment Company of Louisiana, or a 45-foot Army dredge tender of Army Design 320, mirroring the Equitable design. I’m guessing she’s ON 1060493, originally the Army ST 2051, then the Army Corps Fort  Brooke , and now owned by Sampit Towing of Charleston SC.”

And by William Lafferty: “I’m thinking the larger tug is Susan Richards, built in 1909 by the Fore River Shipbuilding Corporation at Quincy, Massachusetts, as the Gen. R. H. Jackson for the Army Quartermaster Corps and stationed at Jacksonville, Florida, later named Fort Sumter and Three Bros. It’s owned by Richards Marine Towing at McClennanville, South Carolina, and has been a fixture at Charleston for decades, originally run by White Stack Towing there.”

Thx George and William.

Crossing the border north to North Carolina, my next stop is Southport, where Sea Oak was working on a dredge project.

And after that, it’s Wilmington and Cape Henry.

The next batch is from Morehead City NC.  Atlantic Dawn was working on a dredging project there.

Na Hoku was there also, formerly a K-Sea boat. She currently works out of Jacksonville.

Liz Alma was too.  

Morehead City is the deep water export center for potash, mined farther north in Aurora.  Grace Moran then waited at the dock.  Is she still around?

Beaufort Belle, then PSC Phosphate, is now Norfolk tug.  Has she been repainted?

Peter G. Turecamo appears still to be working in Morehead City.

Clearly marked here in Norfolk are Miss Willa, Nancy McAllister, and McAllister Sisters.  Second from the left might be Steven Eileen McAllister.

Jack T. Moran was just a year old back ion 2017.

Thunder is one of a trio of Robbins Maritime small tugs with meteorological names:  Thunder, Lightning, and Storm.

Camie  is also a Robbins Maritime boat.

Anne Jarrett is another Norfolk Tug vessel.  It resembles a Vane tug, and at least two former Vane boats are now with Norfolk Tugs:  ex-Patapsco and Sassafras.

All photos, WVD.  The * denotes that most but not all photos were taken in May 2017.  It’s high time I take another trip along the ICW to see what has changed.  And we still have more from Norfolk to the sixth boro.

 

Yes . . . I’ve been off wifi and away from the sixth boro, sometimes admiring images like the one below.  I’m back now and have more photos from July 2010 to revisit the Piscataqua, and a watershed where I canoed, kayaked, and just generally roamed from 1986 until 2000, along with some hiatuses out of the country.

A fixture in Portsmouth NH is the Moran fleet on Ceres Street.

L to R back in July 2010 are Mary M Coppedge, Carly A. Turecamo, and Eugenia Moran.  Mary M Coppedge, 1975 and 95′ x 30′ and 3200 hp is still in service.  Eugenia Moran 1966 and 102′ x 28′ and single screw 2875 hp and built at Jakobson  is “laid up.”   Carly A. Turecamo, 1966 and 98′ x 30′ and single screw at 2200 hp is now Marjorie Winsow.

Sakonnet . . . based in Gosport  . . . is a mystery to me.  This photo was taken in Portsmouth.

Portsmouth Navy Yard (PSNY) in the Picataqua has been active since 1800, the presidency of John Adams, making it the oldest continuously operated USN shipyard.   YTB 771 aka Keokuk, 109′ x 31′ was commissioned in 1964. Some other YTBs that have been featured on this blog can be found here.  The sixth boro’s staple ex-YTB is Ellen McAllister.

YTL 602 aka Cocheco was commissioned in 1945.

Nose-to nose with YTL 602 is a tug I can’t identify.  It’s much newer and has lots of fendering below the waterline, an adaptation for working with submarines, which is PNSH’s specialty.

By this article, the mystery tug and the one below are both LT-65 tugs, although that seems impossible to me.

Sir William Pepperell appears to be a launch named for a Colonial merchant from Kittery ME, right across the Piscataqua.  Click here to read a 1924 published book about  Pepperell and two friends written by John Francis Sprague.

Two USCG cutters in the harbor that day were Reliance and

Campbell.

And of course . . . there were lobster boats galore.

 

I have not been back in since 2017, when I went to see the new Moran tug San Jose. It’s high time for a revisit.  A memorable canoe trip I took there was  . . . early 1990s on the Great Bay, starting in Newmarket and eventually losing the tide.

Here‘s a bit more.

All photos, WVD.

Nothing says the Delaware River up around Philadelphia and Camden more distinctly than a group of Hays tugs, here Big Daddy, High Roller, and Purple Hays.  That’s the stern of Grape Ape to the left. No company, I gather, has had more fun naming their boats than the Hays Tug and Launch folks.   I hope Ed Roth got photos of these boats.

And I’ve never had so much fun on the Delaware River area than I did the day my friend John Curdy took me on a tour there.

Timothy McAllister was docked nearby.  She’s almost a twin of the sixth boro’s Ellen McAllister.

Amberjack (1981) was still in gray. She’s now the latest Thomas Dann, but I’ve not seen her yet.

Jack Holland was pushing a scow. Today’s Jack‘s in Norfolk.

I’m not sure where the 1967 Jakobson-built Grace Moran is,

but Helen D is now Sarah D, and is regularly seen on the Hudson.

Active, a 1956 Blount product, has been sold south and is now Chandler B, operating out of Virginia.

Soon after I took this photo, Coral Sea was sold to a Nigerian company and, at last report, was operating off Nigeria as Uganwaafor 2. I suspect she’s currently inactive.

Texan here is mostly out of the notch of Ponciana. She’s currently near Beaumont TX on the Neches River.

And finally, it’s USS Arthur W. Radford (DD 968) getting prepped for reefing. About a year later that reefing happened about 30 miles offshore, which appears to be out of range for most fishermen.

All photos, June 2010, by WVD, who will be in and on the Delaware River later this week, way in in the wild part of the river in NYS, trying to commune with the wild.   Don’t be concerned if no new posts appear for a spell after Wednesday.

 

This Stella Polaris . . . a very common vessel name for obvious navigation reasons, is less than 400′ and about 20 years old.  The curious building off the bow is the Boldt Castle Power House and Clock Tower . . .  or BCPHCT.

Algoma Conveyor, SLSWmax, was still under construction a year ago in Jiangsu, China.

Narie is another recent Chinese built cargo ship

in the Great Lakes, I’ve read, for the first season, although other Polsteam boats have worked there for some years.

The oldest Great Lakes port in the US is Oswego, and it sees lakers like the Japan-built cement ship NACC Argonaut fairly frequently.

With the right vessel, one can travel from the Great Lakes directly to NYC, of course, and when we did, we ran into Disney Magic, Italian built, Bahamian flagged, and Spain overhauled.

Making this likely the most diverse “random ships” post ever, here’s P61, an Irish patrol vessel named for Samuel Beckett. Unless I’m mistaken, this “writers” class comprises the largest vessels in the Irish Naval Service. Here’s a photo of Beckett leaving town yesterday taken by frequent commenter Phil Gilson.

Cembay is another Japan built cement carrier, 1997, shuttling between the US and Port Daniel QC. 

And finally . . .  YM World is, as of this posting, steaming toward Savannah, after shifting boxes here in Bayonne.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp within the past 30 days.

…aka backwards to Montreal, reprising the trip in reverse order before I return there, which I’ll do in a little over a week.

We departed the Rondout in late afternoon, bound for the sixth boro.  It’s always interesting to see what floats near the mouth of the Creek . . . as an example the former Floating Hospital!   I don’t know the current owner of this vessel.

Not floating, but splashing and gamboling about . . . these critters of God’s pastures seemed thrilled by the weather and fresh water.

Spooky is still there . . . weathered a tad.

Another deer arrived.

Gowanus Bay still floats there.

Deer checked their 12 and their 6.

EliseAnn Conners (built in 1881!!!) and the Pennsy …   399 Barge still waited.

So was the repurposed 1963 Belgian cargo motor barge now called Sojourn. . .  in in the town of Sojourner!

So it all was under the watchful eye of a somewhat camouflaged guardian.

All photos upriver by Will Van Dorp, who did this first post on the Creek back now over a decade ago.

 

Here are the previous three installments of this title.  After seven straight weeks away, I’m back in the boro for a while, a short while, and it seems the best way to catch up–attempt to–is to work backwards, starting from now.

A welcome sight on the west side of midtown . . . . Chandra B, ensconced here in the marine guard.  A great name for an organization?

Nearby, Miss Circle Line stands at the ready.

Still earlier this morning, I caught St. Andrews, 

and before that Frances.  More of her as I work backwards in time.

Earliest of all today . . .  Helen Laraway.

 

One from our arrival yesterday . . .  it’s Thunder Bay, an icebreaker assigned to summertime and UN Week duties.  As the name of a Lake Superior port, this name goes with lakers as well.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who feels a bit like Rip Van Winkle this morning.   Maybe I should gallivant a bit in the sixth boro . . .

 

It’s another day of mostly but not entirely pics.

See the tags for names.

Nunalik began life in 2009 as Beluga Fairy.  I love these names.

Nunalik is one of the NEAS fleet serving Canada’s north country.  It is Inuit owned.

Therefore, it’s name is written in Inuktitut.

Sedna is also a name associated with the north.

 

 

 

The port of Salaberry-de-Valleyfield has a lot of Arctic-destined products.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has wifi only when he has wifi.

 

 

Let’s record some of the ships along the same stretch as yesterday’s post did for tug boats, and the names are in the tags.

Nordic Barents was discharging iron ore for the Contrecoeur, although I don’t know the provenance of the ore.

 

The oil port is certainly concentrated.

 

 

 

I took Happy Buccaneer to be an almost new vessel . . . little would I have thought it was built in 1984!!

 

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Mostly photos, and all taken between Quebec City and Montreal.  Ocean Charlie is a great name.

Ocean Henry Bain moves a barge, possibly from a passenger terminal.

x

Ocean Intrepide hangs at East Montreal.

But here in the South Shore Canal . . . the outlier . . .

 

Mary E. Hannah is way from out of the area.

 

And finally . . . in Valleyfield, it’s Cercle Polaire of GFFM.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who posts when possible these days.

 

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