You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘gallivant’ tag.

I’m still stuck on that cypher 12, imagining hypothetical calendars.  So why not some trucks, other transport-for-hire “highway ships” which the blog has also strayed into due to family connections.  If I misidentify any dates here, I’m sure I’ll be corrected, but I hope you enjoy the photos.

This 1952 (?) Chevy light truck is configured like a parcel tanker plying the seas, a different vintage in each cask.

Boats can’t carry ships, but many ships carry boats, and in this case Badger carries trucks, fleets of them.

This ’49 Ford does what little it does very well:  it has a billboard mounted where a flatbed once lay.  What it advertises doesn’t matter:  it was the truck that caught me attention.

This Volvo (2014?) looked to be the way to negotiate the roads of Queens this snowy day last year.

Fuel trucks like this 1939 Dodge Airflow is guaranteed to turn heads anywhere;

While we’re on fuel trucks, I’m guessing this to be a 1950-something Diamond Reo, but I’m just guessing.  I’ve no idea about the light pickup behind it. Studebaker?

1947 Ford?

1948 or 9 Willys Jeep?  Here’s what I’m basing that on.

1941 Dodge streamliner fuel truck  . . .

Well, the cruise ship dates from 2000;  the Peterbilt . . . I’d say from the same era but with the stock grille replaced.  ??

1960 Ford F-500?

And this is a modification of replica of an art deco “guardian of traffic” from the Hope (as in Bob Hope–his father–) Memorial Bridge in Cleveland.  Who knew !  And for the record, I love those sculptures, but I can’t look at them while I’m driving.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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Happy September 3, 

and August 2

and  . . . well, someone’s vision of  the moment or a zeitgeist,

heritage,

zeitgeist,

heritage,

zeitgeist,

heritage…

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who thinks that’s where a tension exists.

 

Seen this logo before?  I had not.

Millville?  That would be the town formerly known as Shingle Landing in New Jersey, and here’s the origin and logic of the name.

Also, in the yard and visible and indomitable from the street overtop the buildings, it’s

Invincible.

And this, I take it, is the start of a new barge.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is sorry to miss the tugboat race this year.  Here was my 2009 post, and here’s an index of all the others.

Here’s more of the Grand River Navigation fleet.

 

According to the Harvey Hadland site, Kari A dates from 1938.  Previously known as Hustler, she was the product of Burger Boat in Manitowoc.

I was fortunate to have done this walk around in Mackinac City MI

 

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders whether fish tugs ever towed trawl nets….

 

To me, this is a water craft built with craftsmanship and sailed with care.

 

The blue boat . . . well, I just hope the paddler is not wearing headphones.

Here’s another hand-crafted wooden boat.

 

Here?    Well, kayaks are fun.   I used to spend many hours in an earlier version of these surfing New Hampshire coastal waves, but I wonder about using them here.  The positive is the discovery possible in human-powered and small scale boats.

Here’s a craftsman of small craft I’d like to find more about, Ralph Frese.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Tomorrow I head back out on my longest gallivant yet, even before I process what could be from the previous jaunt.  But I have a list I’ll work on when energy and wifi coincide.  But not to worry if I’m silent for a day or a week or three.

Part of me would be happy to stay in the boros;  if you’re near the sixth boro with a camera, keep your eyes open for  Ariadne,  the perfect name for a cable-laying vessel.

In the past month, I passed under more than a hundred bridges, and over a bunch also.  On July 22, we passed beneath the TZ Bridge, one space to the east from the main channel because of ongoing work to complete the last span.

Just to reiterate the record, the old bridge opened in December 1955.

 

That gap will be filled with these, then still also 100 miles away.

On July 23 we passed under these next two bridges, the Smith (1928) … the southernmost freight rail bridge since 1974.  Here’s who the Smith memorializes.

Beyond the rail bridge is the Castleton Bridge (1959), the connector between the Thruway and the MassPike. “Castleton” is a village of fewer than 2000 people.

I call this the Albany Swivel, but the more accurate name is the Livingston Avenue Bridge, opened

in 1902!  You’d think it abandoned, but if you’ve ever traveled on Amtrak through Albany, you’ve been on it.

I don’t know the actual name or alphanumeric designation for this one, but its carries all the freight/passenger trains through the Mohawk Valley.

A blurry photo I know, but it shows an Amtrak train crossing just east of lock E-19 in Frankfort NY, once world renowned home of Carlotta the lady aeronaut and the Meyers Balloon Farm.

All photos, sentiments, and any errors by Will Van Dorp, and more bridges to come as wifi and inspiration provide.

 

Here’s a new look in ship-assist boats.  Can you tell what else is unconventional?

More on the design later in the post.

This is a classic design in freshwater tugs.  And this particular boat you’ve seen in a number of posts on this blog in 2016, if you’re a faithful reader.  It’s in these.

I’ve never seen Grouper‘s hull out of the water–and I hope to some day–but I’m imagining it’s fairly similar.

It’s GL tug Nebraska, 1929 launched, still working in Toledo, and in the yard only for preventative maintenance.   Over in the distance, that’s Maine, nearing the century mark and likely to be scrapped soon. Here’s an entire page with links devoted to GL tugs ….

You’ve seen this design before:  Cheraw is a YTB of the vintage of tugs like the sixth boro’s Ellen McAllister, but in the livery of the USACE.  I don’t know if USACE operates any other ex-YTBs among their very large fleet.

And in closing this post, here’s Seahound, 1941 built in the US and since 1957 working in Canada.  Since these shots show her at a dock in Windsor and pushing a barge marked . .  .

ferry service, I’m left wondering if Seahound shuttles vehicles between here and Detroit.  Anyone help?  And I know better than to take any names literally, but given her location, she might better be called Straithound?

So to get back to the top two photos . . . that’s Cleveland, the prototype for a new series of  harbor assist tugs built in Cleveland using a Damen design.  And what you may have noticed is the absence of a stack.  Engines exhaust through the stern.  Much more in this article from Professional Mariner here.   Here’s more from the Damen site.  Here are other links showing the environment where GL tugs operate while assisting cargo vessels in Cleveland.

All photos, sentiments, and any inadvertent errors by Will Van Dorp, who’s grateful to Great Lakes Shipyard for the tour.

 

I’ll identify this one in a bit, but try guessing?  Here’s the helm and

the engine room.  It was re powered in 1952–3 and has proven its value in both fire and ice.

While you ponder that–if you so choose–check out these related vessels.  I’m not sure the one below has a name.

Curtis Randolph‘s namesake was a Detroit firefighter.  Click here for a site dedicated to Detroit fireboats.

Hogan is NEITHER a government boat nor a fireboat, but it berths near Randolph and does perform emergency duties in the Detroit River.

Ditto Mackinac Marine Rescue, although it can fight fire as well.

And this returns us to the two photos at the top of this post:  it’s the Elizabethport NJ built E. M. Cotter, built in 1900 in the area right across from Howland Hook.

She’s lovingly kept immaculate by her very proud crew with some funds raised independently. 

Click here for an article from a few days ago on needs of this, the world’s oldest working fireboat. At that link, there are also photos of Cotter‘s operations over the years.

As that article also says, it’s the fine Swedish steel that explains her longevity.

If you’re from Elizabeth NJ or anywhere in northern NJ,

it’s well that you know about this fine vessel and the shipyard where she was first launched,  where the first class of USN submarines were also built.   Also, John Purves, the museum-based tug in Sturgeon Bay, was also built in Elizabethport.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

The channels –here negotiated by Pride–run close to shore along the southern side of Mackinac Island,

necessitating careful monitoring of navaids, here is Buckthorn.

Near the strait that forms the somewhat undefined boundary between Huron and Michigan,  we meet Sharon M I pushing Huron Spirit, the barge and not the pilot boat by the same name.

The massive bridge spanning the strait here is about 10 miles to the east.  Click here to find out where the Mack Bridge ranks among the longest suspension bridges in the world as of now.

Note the blue color the water.  Here’s how the colors of the Great Lakes look from satellite images.  Earlier this year a Sea Grant scientist told me the new issue on the Lakes, especially the upper ones is oligotrophism related to zebra and quagga mussels.  Erie, however,  tends toward the hypereutrophic with especially serious algae blooms this summer.

Until I’ve a better system for night photos on the dark Lake, I’ll dispense with photos like the one below.

The Budweiser mural on the silos in Manitowoc today is just a mural, artwork, since the silos are now owned by Briess.  No beer–except home brew– is made in this part of this town.  As to the current owners, here’s the Briess Malt & Ingredients site, resident peregrine and all.

SS Badger can withstand anything the Lake can throw at her, but crossing in extreme weather might make for uncomfortable and dangerous conditions for the passengers, as was the case within 24 hours of my taking this photo.

Here’s a fluvial centric map of Chicago.  We docked just south of the area marked 4 here, but I decided to scout out Bubbly Creek, near 1.

Here’s a photo of Bubbly Creek from a century back, along with an explanation of the name.

My actual destination on Bubbly Creek was the Chicago Maritime Museum.  Check them out. If I’d have been there a little later, I could have gone to the presentation on Cap Streeter, a synopsis of which is here.

Once docked, though, I wanted to explore the southern shore water’s edge around to the east, to Indiana.  That’s the Chicago skyline below, and

here, is more of the picture I wanted, the Burn’s Harbor steel making site, part of the manufacturing infrastructure for which much of the Lakes’ traffic exists.

Quite a nice beach, actually.

All photos and sentiments and any inadvertent errors by Will Van Dorp, who will soon return to this area and suspend new blog posts until  reliable wifi is available.

Although I’m a newbie, this being only my second run on Huron, I suspect this view dominates the experience of crossing Huron, possibly Superior also, which I’ve not traversed.  Huron is the inland sea with the longest shoreline, surrounded by sparse population.  Sarnia, the largest city on Huron has about 70,000; Port Huron, 30,000; and Alpena, 10,000.  Of course, Bay City–population 35,000– lies there also, but at more than 50 miles into Saginaw Bay, it’s a city you go to as a destination, which I need to do soon.  I’m eager to visit all the towns along this lake.

Off to starboard, it’s Thunder Bay, China-built, Seawaymax.

To port, it’s barge Menominee pushed by

Olive L. Moore.  If you look at no other link than this one in this post, check this one for the evolution of this tug since the hull was first laid down in Manitowoc in 1928, designed low to fit under the bridges in Chicago.

Arcticus ,Laurentian, a USGS vessel launched in 2014, was working some research project off our starboard.  Here’s a post I did in 2014 on another USGS vessel at its christening in Oswego.

Otherwise, along the shore there are lights  like Thunder Bay Island Light,

(and I’m not sure of the identification here) New Presque Isle Light, and

Spectacle Reef Light.

Near here, we passed tug Michigan pushing barge Great Lakes, which I last saw in Montreal last fall.

 

Martin Reef Light tells us we’re approaching the Straits, as

does the appearance of Kristen D, the ferry between Cheboygan and another Bois Blanc Island–more places to visit some day. Kristen D dates from the late 1980s.

Samuel D. Champlain I could pick out anywhere by its profile, but John C. Munson I had to check on my device. SDC appeared on this blog several times before, with a closeup here, and in a previous iteration here. Last year I caught SDC southbound in roughly the same end of Lake Huron.

And less than a mile from the dock on Mackinac Island, we pass Round Island Light.

Writing this post has clarified one section of where my next road trip will take me.  All photos and sentiments, errors, etc. by Will Van Dorp.

Related:  Check out these 10 facts about the Great Lakes.

Unrelated:  The 2017 NYC tugboat race is scheduled for Sunday Sept. 3. 

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