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I visited Southport once before, six years ago, when I met a wonderful gentleman who showed off his 1938 restored fishing boat Solomon T, here.

This time a small dredge operation was going on near shore, involving P&L’s Hercules.  Also

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there was Sea Oak (whose fleet mates have some great names here)  and

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Candice L.  Thanks to SM.

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Also, working on the project was crew boat Captain Tom.

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I plan to get back to Southport in late spring.

Part of my interest here is explained by this book:  Masters of the Shoals. 

 

 

Georgetown is South Carolina’s second largest port.  More on that in a moment, but for now, here’s an intriguing photo from the South Carolina Maritime Museum in town.  Where in New York was this steam houseboat built, I wonder.  In the Santee Gun Club notes, it reports that it took four months to deliver Happy Days from NY to Santee.  And, are they standing on ice here?

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Here’s what I saw of commercial vessels in port.  In the background is

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the now-shuttered ArcelorMittal steel plant.  Beyond the steel plant is International Paper mill, clearly quite busy. The mill grew out of the Atlantic Coast Lumber Company.

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I mentioned the maritime museum:  it’s worth a stop.  Also, check out the Gullah Museum.

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This intriguing artifact is outside, with the story

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here and below.   What’s misleading about the photo below is that the propeller is from the Norwegian freighter Eriksson, which at 285′ was smaller than the whaleback Everett, 346′.

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From Auke Visser, here are many more photos of City of Everett.

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One thing I found surprising about the history of Georgetown is its connections with Maine shipbuilders.

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You can guess how this encounter between the 168′ 506 ton four-master and the 403′ 6026 ton steamer turned out.  Read about the findings of the court in reference to the collision here. Click here for more info on SS Prinz Oskar, which became Orion after the US seized it.

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Will Van Dorp, who’s heading back to Georgetown in the spring, took the photos here both inside the museum and along the boardwalk.

*** Click here for the archive of the “early history of the Santee Club


		

We’ve seen this vessel before here, although not as much of it, and  there’s more on it at the end of this post.

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She looks to have at least a 400 hp.

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Happy holidays . . .

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To be fair, I did not see her underway, although I’d love to have.

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These photos were taken last week in Southport, NC.  Here’s more info on Bay Queen: built in Orange, TX in 1941 as NOKA (YN 54), later DORIS LOVELAND , RUSSELL 16*, and LIN CLAY.  She underwent conversion at Willoughby Spit, VA about 1994.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

*The name Russell 16 has been used for more than one boat.

If you don’t recognize the name “kiptopeke,” I’ll just say this is not the Arthur Kill or Nouadhibou or Alang . . .

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Note the pelican/gull segregation . . .

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Guesses?

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The bridge in the background might be a clue.  There was once a time that you needed a ferry to cross between Norfolk and the southern Delmarva peninsula, and these wrecks protected the landing at Kiptopeke Beach.

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Nine wrecks mostly end to end lie off the Virginia beach disintegrating.

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For much better close ups, see this link.

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For much more info and additional photos, including one of a ferry passing through the opening between the wrecks, click here.

Congratulations to William Lafferty for identifying the location from the photo in my old/new year’s post.

I’m going to add Kiptopeke’s concrete ships to the list of places I need to revisit in warmer weather and with a small boat.   Better yet, this spot is begging for drone photography.

For many more “port of ” tugster posts, click here.  And if you could do a photo profile of a place I’ve not visited, please get in touch.

 

What happens if you build a pilot boat in Massachusetts to be used on the Great Lakes?  It needs to get to its place of use.

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Thanks to the NY Media Boat, I got these photos this week as the Huron Spirit hurried through

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the sixth boro.   North of the watery boro, I was invited to ride through the Erie Canal  before it closes on November 20.

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Above is the wall above lock 16 and below, it’s the approach to lock 19, where you have to first duck under the triple-track rail bridge.

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The photo below, taken at lock 21, was Wednesday afternoon.  By now, the newest Gladding Hearn pilot boat has exited the Canal and is making its way up the Great Lakes chain.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wrote this story on the Lakes Pilots.

If you depart at 0400, there’s not much to photograph.  Light beckoned as we approached Newburgh/Beacon.

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I saw Mt. Beacon as I never had before;

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ditto Storm King in sunrise that even dappled

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the wave tops.

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Once around Gee Point, we saw the statue (to the left on the ridge)

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of Kościuszko’s, fortifier of West Point.

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Once south of the Bear Mountain Bridge, passengers traveled upstream

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for seasonal seesighting.

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Scrap was sought.

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Sloops sailed and

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work boats waited their time.

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More statues sighted, and

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vessels waited their time.

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And we had arrived at a place where at least two boros approached each other.

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Will Van Dorp, who took these photos, is back in the boros for a while.

In the drizzle, BBC Alabama awaits cargo in Port of Albany.

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Pocomoke transfers cargo,

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Brooklyn heads south,

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Hudson Valley sentinels keep vigil no matter

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how much rain falls,

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Doris hangs with Adelaide,

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as does Coral Coast with Cement Transporter 5300,

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Strider rests from striding,

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Union Dede docks at a port that 10 years ago was sleepy,

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HR Pike (?) rests on rolling spuds,

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Saugerties Light houses B&B guests,

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not far from Clermont, home of the father-in-law of the father of steam boating on the Hudson and then the Mississippi,

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Comet pushes Eva Leigh Cutler to the north,

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Spooky‘s colors look subdued in the fall colors, and

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two shipyard relatives meet.

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Will Van Dorp took all these photos in a 12-hour period.

As we progress toward winter as well, the daylight hours shorten, making less to photograph, but I was happy we passed lock E8 in daylight to capture the crane GE uses to transship large cargos, like the rotor of a few weeks ago.

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The changing leaves complement the colors of the vintage floating plant,

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locks,

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and even Thruway vessels.

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Venerable Frances is a tug for all seasons as is

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the Eriemax freighter built in Duluth,

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both based near the city of the original Uncle Sam, which splashes its wall

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with additional color and info.

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Once this Eriemax passenger vessel raises its pilot house, we’ll continue our way to the sixth boro.

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Will Van Dorp took all these photos in about a 12 hour period.

You saw this vessel in an earlier post.  It’s back from the Arctic for the season, most likely.

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We steamed through the night, so here’s our vessel already in Ogdensburg on a rainy morning. The river separating the US from Canada here is about a mile wide.

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There was a time when folks who backed the wrong horse fled the US as refugees.

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The land you see in the background is US.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Again, with limited wifi, it’s mostly photos, these all taken around Montreal.

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Below is the MSC ship we followed on the approach to Trois Rivieres.

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The green hull is loading and the brown, discharging.

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See the grain elevator and the MSC ship in the distance.

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The new Champlain Bridge is going up right next to the old one.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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