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The photo below comes via Russell Skeris, who seems to have gotten it from Fred Miller II . . . to keep credits where they belong.  Click here for two previous posts Russell contributed to.  I’m curious where this photo was taken, given the US/Canadian flags on the mast.  And when?  It would have to be 1998 or prior, given the stack.  Anyhow, Russell writes, “It was a nice little surprise to log onto tugster this am and see the pics of the Frances. It put a smile on my wife’s face ( little Fran [the namesake. She misses her mom who passed in 2014. I thought you might like this pic probably from the 70’s that appears to have been taken on Kodachrome film.It was also before the sun visor had gotten all banged up like in many of the pictures that I’ve found . I’m going to send some older black and whites of Frances being launched in 1957 at Jakobsons in Oyster Bay.”

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Also, he writes, “The weathervane we had made some years ago for the couple on Fran’s house. She really was surprised when we gave it to her and connected her to her past.

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The life ring is a real relic and has hung in the wall in the kitchen for as long as I can remember.”

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Thanks, Russell.   Sorry it took so long to post this.  I guess it’s good that I go away now and then so that old unused posts finally see the light of day.

aka GHP&W 2.  Macedon only became a port when Clinton built his ditch.  The ditch and subsequent iterations connected it to the sea.  When I took the photo below back on Oct 21 2014, eastbound on Urger, I felt very far from salt water.

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But Chris Williams’ photo below, taken October 25, 2015, shows how connected Macedon is to the sixth boro and all watery places on Earth beyond the VZ Bridge.   Less than a week ago, I did a post about Margot, the tug frequently-seen in NYC that delivered this cargo to the port of Macedon.

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Bob Stopper took the next set photos.  The fact that a Goldhofer semitrailer of 12 axles, 48 wheels,  is needed shows the weight of the cargo delivered across the state by NYS Marine Highway.  The land portion of the cargo transfer is provided by Edwards Moving and Rigging.

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Here’s a closeup of the hydraulics at the front of the trailer.

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Transfer from barge to trailer begins with the jacking up of the cargo.

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At this point, there are 96 wheels under and moving the cargo.

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The next photo taken by Rob Goldman, and taken from the NYS Canal Corporation FB page,  on October 31, 2015, shows how the Edwards trailer moves the cargo, one huge piece at a time, off the barge and into the port of Macedon.

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Macedon is one of those place names in central NY named for places or people in classical Greek and Roman history.    Others are Troy, Ithaca, Palmyra, Greece, Athens, Rome  .  .  .  and more;  people memorialized in town names here include Hannibal, Scipio, Pompey, Homer, Ulysses, Brutus  . . . .

Credit for these photos goes to Chris, Bob, and Rob.  My personal connection to Macedon includes the fact that I bought my first car there, less than a half mile from the Canal, and at the time had no clue that it was a port, that it could be connected to the oceans.

Here are previous “port of __” posts i’ve done.

And finally, unrelated, here from another even smaller NY canal port, here’s into on an auction below.

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Although I’ve never named a post after this tugboat, you have seen her prominently in posts like here, here, and here.

Margot and crew specialize in commercial cargoes to places no longer accustomed to seeing such arrive by Canal.   The cargo here is electrical generators for PSEG a pair of very heavy transformers …. for RG&E Macedon.

Here’s the lowest air draft on the Canal, about 15 feet under Bridge E-93.  I’m guessing that an egg positioned at the high point on Margot would have been crushed here.  You’ve seen this bridge before on this blog here . . . last photo.

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Notice how low the barge is.  It’s flooded with water to reduce the air draft of the top of the cargo.

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All these photos were taken between Montezuma and Macedon.

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Here the tow is exiting Lock 27.

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All the above photos were taken by Bob Stopper, frequent upstate contributor to this blog.  The next two come thanks to Chris and Eileen Williams, whose work also has been featured here.  Here the tow waits to be offloaded just west of Lock 30.

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A final photo–mine–I took in March 2015;  I include it here to show what travels between the water’s surface and the canal bed.

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Bravo to NYS Marine Highway, and thanks to Bob, Chris, and Eileen for these photos.

Here was the first in the series from late in August this year.  Of course this tug with its earlier, longer name has been here many times before.

The point of this post is to profile the mobility of the world afloat . . . people, cargoes, movers . . .  Here was Frances in Waterford early morning Saturday, September 12.  Note Lehigh Valley 79 down the way.

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The next two photos come thanks to Glenn Raymo, who lives and takes some great photos up by Poughkeepsie.  Late Monday afternoon–September 14– he caught not only Frances but also the hitchhiking barge Lehigh Valley 79 southbound, along with several scows of crushed stone.  I guess all barges hike hitches, technically.

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Here the “tow” passes Mariner’s on the Hudson, in Highland, NY, where Jeff Anzevino keeps his photo platform.

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The following morning I caught this photo of Frances over in front of Bayonne.  By now, Lehigh Valley 79 had been returned to its place over in Red Hook Brooklyn.

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From the Erie Canal, where some of the Frances crew may have taken part in the line toss,  to New York City’s sixth boro in a couple days .  . this is a water world.  And what makes it even more remarkable,

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a versatile tug like Frances could–if there was a compelling reason to do so, traverse the Erie Canal and head into the huge north coast area we call the Great Lakes Basin.

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Thanks to Glenn Raymo for the two photos above;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

It’s been a few years since Lehigh Valley 79 was there, but David Sharps added a new feature to the parade–a

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brassy salute

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to each vessel that passed for review.

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And what a potpourri of vessels that was!

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Folks who from Monday to Friday work on precision instruments indoors . . . on weekends go to the physics lab on the river and experiment with vectors.

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Others compete shoreside commanding line to fly.

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If you missed this one, make plans now for 2016.

Lehigh Valley #79 was last at the Roundup in 2010.  See it here and here.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

Like Pelham, Frances has been around the block quite a long time, since 1957, in fact.  Type Frances Turecamo –or just Frances– into the search window on the blog and you’ll see more of her.

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I’m happy to see the shine on her and even happier to see her in the water and at work.

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Do the maintenance and repairs.  Keep the paint where it’s needed and

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she’ll make money for a long time.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is still on the road.

I will be back tomorrow with close-ups of L’Hermione and more, but Bjoern of New York Media Boat sent me the very intriguing photo below.  Recognize it?  Answer follows.  Clue:  Elizabeth Anna.

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Well, L’Hermione  (pronounced LAIR me un) will find her way into more of these photos.  Here’s the venerable W. O. Decker.  Click and scroll to see her at work a few decades back.

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It’s Pelham, power unit for Wavertree not long ago.

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And it’s James Turecamo, preparing to escort in the French frigate currently at South Street.

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And Frederick E. Bouchard, in the process of switching B. No. 264 from on the hawser to alongside.

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And my first shot of James E. Brown, brand spanking new.  I’ll devote a whole post to James E. soon, I hope.

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Laura K. Moran watches the French lion pass . . .

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as does Frances out in Gravesend Bay.

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And the answer to the question about Elizabeth Anna . . . the top photo . . . I believe it’s the erstwhile Bear, the Disch tug acquired by DonJon at an auction back in December 2014.  I wonder where she’s headed.  Anyone help out?

Except the top photo by Bjoern Kils, all photos in the past few days by Will Van Dorp.

And if I haven’t said this explicitly enough, New York Media Boat is the faster, most versatile, shallowest draft means to see whatever you want in the sixth boro.  Need waterborne support for a project or  . . .want to see or show someone the sixth boro and its borders with the other boros, check them out.

The most unambiguous sign of spring is a recreational boat in the sixth boro.

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Margot always ranges widely . . . . but when the Erie Canal is still closed for the season, she’s more frequently in the sixth boro.

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Buchanan 12 is back doing stonework . . .

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big scale.  In winter I’ve not seen this.  Ice preventing it maybe?

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Black-hulled USCG vessels are more common in winter.  I’m not sure what Sanibel (WPB 1312) was doing in town.

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Another indisputable sign of spring .  .  . is that big sliver .  . . in a vulnerable position vis-a-vis the gull.

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All kidding aside, it’s an impressive boat for a guy who immigrated to the US at age 16 and got a job washing dishes . . . if that’s true.    I wonder who’s taking that selfie there?  Is that a selfie with a circle of friends, a huge boat, and a bridge in the background?

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here are the previous posts by this name.

June 2014 . . . not quite 100 miles west of Albany.

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March 2015 high, dry, and cold maintenance time on Staten Island.

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Same time and place as the first photo above.  Actually leaving lock 19 and headed east.

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Again . . . winter maintenance.

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Outbound Oswego harbor, June 2014.

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And more Staten Island, March 2015.

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Hustling hither and yon along the waterways since 1958, if she could speak,

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I’d love to hear the stories.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Take a European canal/river barge . . . .  This one was built in 1963 in Moerbeke, Belgium, by Marinus Faasse.  He named it Leja, the portmanteau word for his parents’ names, Lena and Jacob.

Here’s part of the text of an email I received today from Maja Faasse:  “Leja was the second motor barge my parents have built. It is named after our grandparents, Lena and Jacob. Our father, Marinus  … knows every detail.  For about 40 years he made his living on Leja, as did our mother for 34 years after they married. My sisters Leona,  Jaccoline, and I were born and raised on the Leja, and have very good memories and had a very nice childhood on the water. Every vacation from boarding school and most weekends we spent on board. The summer vacations where the best times, 6 weeks of playing and swimming. Our parents had to sell the barge because our mother needed a pair of new knees and recovery wasn’t possible on board, so they had stopped their business with pain in their heart, and sold it to an owner in France, who renamed it Sojo.”

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We were planning a trip to France this spring to go find the barge . . . and go look for it. So we contacted the broker for information where the Sojo could be at that time and wanted to see what is still original and what is new.  But . . .

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then the broker told us that the owner had renamed it Sojourn and moved it from France to the USA. Later on we also found a picture on the Erie Canal taken in May 2013.

Our father just turned 78 years and his biggest wish is to still visit the Sojourn.”

The photos below were taken in October 2014 by Bob Stopper.  They show her being moved by Benjamin Elliot toward her current location in the Lyons.

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Stories like Maja’s move me, and I certainly hope Marinus Faasse gets to visit with his half-century-plus-years creation soon in Lyons, where snow likely covers it.

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Click here and here for photos of some other Dutch barges in the northeastern parts of the US.  There may be more, and if so, I’d love to learn about them.  For some motor barges that traveled from west-to-east on the Atlantic, click here for a post I did four years ago.

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Many thanks to Maja Faasse for writing.  Also, to Bob Stopper who sent the three photos of Sojourn back last fall.  Also, a tip of the hat to Lewis Carroll for coining the portmanteau portmanteau.

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Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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