You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘USN’ category.

A relative’s big birthday brought me to Philly for the first time in a long while and afforded a few minutes to look around.  Name that carrier?  I once walked its decks as a visitor more than three decades ago, and have a friend who served aboard . . .  as a journalist in the USN.

On an earlier trip of the Delaware, I recall seeing that faded reddish, peeling gray on Arthur W. Radford (DD968) before it was reefed.

Got the name?

But wait, there’s more . . . including one that should not be there.

I’d heard that Powhatan-class Apache had just been decommissioned and towed there last week, and this was the vessel I wanted to check on.  The link in that previous sentence I posted a decade ago, after walking her decks.  Recognize the larger vessel to Apache‘s port?

I wonder where Apache‘ll end up, now that her replacement(s) are under construction.

The one below would not have been there if a tow last month has gone without issues, as seen here but you have to scroll. I wonder when she’ll attempt her final journey next.

Yup, it’s ex-USS Yorktown (CG-48), and the carrier is the JFK, another fading Kennedy.

All photos, WVD, who really needs to get to Delaware River ports more often.

For the past week on AIS, this has been “govt vessel 5,” and she’s currently in Stapleton taking on fuel.

Clearly she’s a Freedom-class LCS, with its distinctive bow-low profile.   It’s powered by four engines:  2 x Fairbanks Morse/ Colt-Pielstick 9,100 hp diesels plus two 2 x Rolls-Royce 48,000 hp gas turbines run through four Rolls-Royce/Kamewa waterjets.  For routine cruising, I was told on my tour yesterday, only the diesels run.  For sprints, all four are on line.

Tours were open to the public in Stapleton the past few days.

The vessel has no curves, but neither does it have many right angles.

 

 

The explanation offered for the large flight deck is that as a relatively small vessel, it rolls/pitches/etc. in a sea.  The additional space is appreciated by helicopter and drone operators. 

I’d love to have seen the engine room, but this is as close to the engine I got.

Here’s the view back toward the bridge, as seen from between the anchor machinery and the deck gun.

And finally, some views from the helm and

assorted screen, indicators, and the four engine controls.

All photos, WVD.

Below is an article from Saturday’s NYTimes, and the women of the fleet.

 

I’m just observing, not criticizing, but the vessel turnout in 2022 seems quite small. I understand that lots of other things are happening globally.   Following USS Bataan, USCGC Sycamore (WLB-209) and HMS Protector (A-173) arrive.  They are both about 20 years in service and have both done assignments in the Arctic.

Sycamore made a run up to the GW before turning around. I saw her here in the sixth boro just over a year ago.

Protector did not begin life as a UK Royal Navy ice patrol vessel.  Rather, it was built as the 2001 Polarbjørn in Lithuania for GC Rieber, a Norwegian company based in Bergen, a port I visited way back in 1985, on one of my early gallivants.  Unfortunately, in those days I traveled sans camera.

 

 

USCGC Dependable (WMEC-626) built at AmShip in Lorain OH and commissioned in 1968,  is over the midcentury mark and still at work.  AmShip Lorain-closed since the early 1980s-  built some icons, several of their lakers still very much in active service.

 

Most of the medium endurance cutters of Dependable‘s cohort-Reliance class– are still in service, either in the US or elsewhere.

 

 

USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) was commissioned in 2015.   Like Sycamore and Dependable, she was built on the Great Lakes

Four years ago here, I visited the Marinette Shipyard town where Milwaukee came into existence. Some products of Marinette include Sycamore–above–and Ellen McAllister, also involved in Wednesday’s parade into the sixth boro. Katherine Walker, part of the welcoming committee Wednesday, is another Marinette product, as are some of the current Staten island ferries (Molinari class) and some ATBs, like Brandywine and Christiana that pass through the port now and then.

 

As Milwaukee steamed upriver, she slowed and spun a 180 turn much faster than I imagined possible for a 378′ vessel.   I wish I’d been on shore just off her improvised turning basin when she did so. Was anyone there and can send photos?

A sister of Milwaukee, USS Duluth (LCS 21) was commissioned in her namesake city only earlier this week.

All photos, WVD, who hopes to get in some more Fleet Week sights this weekend.  If you’re reading this and arrived in the sixth boro–aka the primary boro–of NYC, welcome. 

 

 

Scouts?  Patrol?  Search pattern?  First and foremost, it’s to honor our war dead, and there are too many of those, even the walking wounded and dead….

Thanks to New York Media Boat, I caught the fleet from a different angle, all while respecting the safety zones.

Note the unmistakeable red of a McAllister tugboat on the starboard bow, along

with a handful more McAllisters and the other fleet vessels following.

The USACE and USCG always take part . . .

USS Bataan (LHD-5) was the lead ship, and

it docked in the Hudson River Passenger Terminal.

More WVD fleet week 2022 photos tomorrow.  Lots more photos of the LHD can be seen here.  A guide to Fleet Week activities can be found here.

Previous tugster fleet week posts can be seen here.

 

One of the joys of wandering around an unfamiliar port is getting surprised, as

I was to see an LCS underway.  I also saw some reference to the place of LCS vessels in the USN fleet here and here on gCaptain. More on the ship and the Independence-class variant can be read here

Know the LCS-8?

 

I guess one aspect of the surprise was that she moved through the San Diego harbor without an escort, as if this were a routine transit, and maybe it was.

More San Diego soon, a port I could have spent more time in and one I surely hope to return to. 

All photos, WVD.

 

Thanks to Bjoern of New York Media Boat, it’s  . . .  LCU 1657.  This was last week, March 2022

At first glance I thought it was a landing craft with a large add-on wheelhouse.  Later I noticed the landing craft was being pushed by a small tugboat named Pierson.  I’m not familiar with this unit.  LCU 1657 was built by Defoe Shipbuilding in Bay City MI in the early 1970s.

George Schneider sent me these photos from July 2021 in San Diego of a very similar if not identical vessel.  He writes “LCU 1648 was built in 1955 by Marinette Marine in Wisconsin.  She is not a commissioned warship, and is considered a ‘boat’ in the Navy hierarchy.”

From August 2021, here’s something unusual.  George writes “the remote-controlled prototype Sea Hawk passed us to the South.  I was still on the bow [of my vessel], and although she was up-sun, I still got some good, clear shots of her.  Then, just to be a nuisance, I called our bridge and asked if they could get the Sea Hawk to turn around and pass down our starboard side for better lighting.  The Captain didn’t dignify my call with an answer, but the Navy must have heard me, because that’s exactly what she did.  So I got excellent underway shots of her, plus

 

I got a shot of her boat number, which is slightly different than we thought.” 

Since the sixth boro is not usual Navy waters except during Fleet Week, we don’t get such exotic vessels here. 

We do see a lot of Vane Brothers vessels in the sixth boro and throughout the East Coast, but in August 2021, Delaware was in  . . . LA!  She’s currently working in Oakland CA.

Many thanks to Bjoern and George for use of these photos.

As you read this, I’m west of the Mississippi following the muddy tributary of the muddy Mississip, but I thought I’d remotely set signals to go up.  Here’s a WW2 story that intersects the sixth boro in a way I’d never heard . .  .  the Chicago museum I and most of you know as U-505 spent some time in the the sixth boro as USS Nemo, and I don’t mean the Florida eatery.  Note that there’s no mention of USS Nemo in this wikipedia account.

Click on the grainy b/w image of the Moran tugboat with the submarine below to get the story.

Hat tip to Bill Orzell for this story;  here are more of his stories in New York Almanack.

And here’s my question:  has any seen photos of USS Nemo in the sixth boro?

Click here for photos of and links to previous submarines I’ve encountered in NY waters since beginning this blog.

 

 

Today the sixth boro and environs face Henri, whose story is yet to be told.  August 26, 2011 . . . I was at the Staten Island Ferry terminal, and these Hurricane Irene signs were up.  When Irene’s story was told, it had done unusual damage upstate far from salt water;  here’s more.  Some repairs took until 2016 to complete.  From here I took the ferry to Whitehall in Manhattan, and then over I walked to South Street Seaport, where I wanted to see storm preparations.  See the story at the end of this post.  

In late August 2011, I was documenting a slow decomposition, getting footage of what became a documentary film called Graves of Arthur Kill. Gary Kane was the producer;  I was the director, or something.  If you’ve not yet seen the documentary, you can order it by clicking on the disintegrating wooden tugboat image along the left aside of this blog page.  Some of the vessels in this post are discussed by multiple sources in the documentary.  Keep in mind that these photos and the footage in the doc recorded these scenes a decade ago, almost to the day.  Hurricanes, freezing and thawing, and just plain daily oxidation have ravaged these already decrepit vessels for another 10 years, so if you were to go to these exact locations, not an easy feat, you’d see a devolution.

I’m not going to re-identify all these boats–already done elsewhere and in the doc–except to say we saw a variety of boats like this tanker above and the WW2 submarine chaser alongside it.

Other WW2 vessels repurposed for post-war civilian purposes are there.  More were there but had been scrapped prior to 2011.

See the rust sprouting out from behind WW2 haze gray.

In the past decade, the steam stack on this coastal ferry has collapsed, and the top deck of the ferry to the right has squatted into the ooze below.

Some steel-hulled steam tugboats we never managed to identify much more than maybe attributing a name;  they’d been here so long that no one remained alive who worked on them or wanted to talk about them.

We used a rowboat and had permission to film there, but the amount of decomposing metal and wood in the water made it nearly impossible to safely move through here. We never got out of the boat to climb onto any of these wrecks.  That would be if not Russian roulette then possibly some other form of tempting fate.

Most emblematic of the boats there might be this boat, USS ATR-89, with its struggling, try-to-get-back-afloat stance.  She was built in Manitowoc, WI, a town I’ve since frequently visited.

Wooden hulls, wooden superstructure . . .  I’m surprised they’ve lasted as long as they have.

Since taking this photo in August 2011, I’ve learned a lot about this boat and its four sisters, one of whom is now called Day Peckinpaugh

I’ve spent a lot of hours this month pulling together info on Day Peckinpaugh, launched as Interwaterways Line 101;  the sister vessel above and below was launched in July 1921 in Duluth as Interwaterways Line 105. The ghost writing in the photo below says Michigan, the name she carried during the years she ran bulk caustic soda between the Michigan Alkali plant in Wyandotte MI and Jersey City NJ via the Erie Canal.  Anyone local have photos of this vessel in the sixth boro or the Hudson River?  I have a photo of her taken in 1947 transiting a lock in the NYS Canal system, but I’ll hold off on posting that for a few weeks when the stories come out. What you’re looking at above and below is the remnants of a vessel currently one century and one month old. 

The Interwaterways Line boats were designed by Capt. Alexander McDougall, who also designed the whalebacks of the Great Lakes, like Meteor. Here‘s a whole blog devoted to McDougall’s whalebacks.

This ferry used to run between Newburgh and Beacon;  on this day in August 2011, we just rowed our boat onto the auto deck.

At the beginning of this post I mentioned Hurricane Irene and going over to South Street Seaport Museum.  Two of these vessels here have seen a lot of TLC$ in the past decade. That’s a good ending for now.  Helen, with the McAllister stack, is still afloat and waiting.

All photos in August 2011, WVD.

A final sentiment on Graves of Arthur Kill . . . Gary Kane and I set out to document what was actually in this much-discussed boneyard;  we wanted to name and show what existed, acknowledge what had existed but was already gone, and dispel some of the legends of this place.  We were both very proud of the work and happy with this review in  Wired magazine.  If you still want to write a review, get in touch.  It would be like writing a series review of Gilligan’s Island, but still a worthy exercise.

 

First, see these three photos from 2009 with updates.  I passed by this spot in Seaford DE this past week . . . on a mission, and the former Flagship Nanticoke Queen restaurant is no more.  Only a graded lot remains where the USS McKeever Brothers (SP-683) WW1 patrol and minesweeper vessel and fishing boat both before that and after the war once was. Route 13 has a bit less character.   The wooden hull was likely buried in a landfill.

From 2009, this is the 1958 Jakobson-built Dalzelleagle and then McAllister Brothers.  And yesterday, she was was towed away to be scrapped. At temperatures between 2500 and 2750°F, that steel will puddle and take new shapes.  Tomorrow I’ll post more photos of this 1958 beauty.

Another photo from 2009 of the 1907 Pegasus . . .  now also history and headed for the same high temperatures and red hot puddles.

A photo from 2012 . . . Siberian Sea, still afloat, and currently called Mike Azzolino.

Also still extant, in fact, David Silver took this photo less than a week ago, the May 1921 launched Day Peckinpaugh.  Yes, that is the Erie Canal between Locks E2 and E3.  The canal water level  is drawn down in the winter/spring for maintenance.

May 21, 1921 precisely was the day Interwaterways 101 came off the ways at the McDougall-Duluth Company shipyard.   Shouldn’t we hold a socially distanced party for the freight ship?

Here was the neat and active Eriemax freighter in 1961.

Thanks to David and Craig for use of their Day Peckinpaugh photos;  the others from 2009 and 2012, WVD.

As to the tragedy of 231′ x 71′ Seacor Power, Seacor Supporter, 131′ x 66′ , came to do some work in the sixth boro here a few years ago. Brazos is 145′ x 100′.

 

I’ve never “reblogged” before, but this is a good post and a good day to do it. Nine years on from this post, and 19 years on from the event that prompted this, I’d have thought we’d be more united.

tugster: a waterblog

Knowing what I knew, Maurania III headed up to the North River–where recently she raced– could only mean one thing, especially

given her accompaniment by Ellen and Elizabeth, also wearing the canvas frocks.  What it meant was that

USS New Yorkhad done its local doing and was

bound for sea.  We’re two days off the one decade anniversary of

quite the tragedy.

By the way, I’m with Bloomberg on this one: please stop calling it ground zero.  Let’s move on because time has moved on.

Also, for the record, we have a local election in my voting district, and I will hang up every time pollsters call and ask if I feel less or more secure now than before 9/11.  It’s a stupid question.  IMHO, be vigilant, but there NEVER is such a thing as complete security, although I’m grateful for those who endeavor to keep…

View original post 23 more words

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,563 other followers
If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Documentary "Graves of Arthur Kill" is AVAILABLE again here.Click here to buy now!

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

October 2022
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31