You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘USN’ category.

Let’s start with two photos thanks to Ashley Hutto, first one from last year.  Remember the HRSG aka “the cyclops” that came down the Hudson?  Tomorrow, another is scheduled to start a journey, then heads for Bridgeport.

Mister Jim above and below as platform, as well as Daisy Mae in the distance, will be involved in the transfer.  By Tuesday late afternoon, the HRSC is scheduled to be at the GW Bridge, and will overnight near the Statue of Liberty before entering the East River and into the Sound.  I’ll miss most of it, since I’ll be in Albany all next week.

No . . . I’m not entering politics.

Another unusual visitor was captured here by Tim Hetrick;  Megan Beyel passes Storm King here, towing a barge upriver.  The photo effectively shows the scale of Storm King.

OSVs like Megan Beyel are quite rare in the Hudson Valley, but they do appear. Four years ago Michael Lawrence spent some time in and out of the sixth boro working on a pipeline project.

Of course, there is a sixth boro quasi-resident OSV . . .  Rana Miller.

 

Rana‘s frequent mission is transporting Yokohamas, used to fender tankers transferring product offshore.

 

And from rubber to rubber, here’s a small USN tug moving rendering barrier around.  This photo comes from George Schneider, who writes, “Your photo (scroll) represents the smallest of them, the 19-footers, [like this one] one towing fender-style booms  (barriers?), but they also work as gate boats for the anti-swimmer booms  (barriers?) mentioned.  As you can see this one is officially designated 19BB0212, but has the local designation BB4.  They adopt some of the jargon from their origins as log broncs  (and scroll to Skillful) and call them “Beaver Boats” to differentiate them from the other boats designed to transport or place the light oil pollution booms.   This one was built by Chuck’s Boat and Drive Company (“C-Bad”) of Longview, WA, who also built 25-foot version for the Navy.  I imagine you’d find them at just about any station where the Navy ties up their ships.  At least 12 of the 19-footers and at least 22 of the 25-footers have been built for the Navy, as well as other designs that begin to look more like conventional pushboats as they grow in size. ”  Thanks much, George.

Finally, thanks to Steve Munoz, another one of these small tugs, this one spotted near the USS Constitution in Charlestown MA.

Many thanks to Ashley, Tim, George, and Steve for the photos and info.  The photos of Rana Miller by Will Van Dorp.

What is the possible identity of the Moran tug below?  We really don’t know.

The source is Xtian Herrou, a regular tugster reader and commenter.  He writes:  “Seen yesterday during a local model expo at Crozon  in Brittany, France.  The tug is very small (scale 1/400) and there is not really a name, just white tag.  For details about the SS Brasil (1957),  you can read the panel on picture 6326

Personally, I’m thrilled that a model maker in France does a Moran tug.

And a question from a reader, Mike Hatami, who did not take the photo.  Mike provided follow-up on the repurposing of NYC DEP vessel Newtown Creek two years ago here.

What is this vessel?  Is it a USN vessel?

 

A possible answer is found  here.   “We use these specifically in San Diego. I don’t know where this picture was taken, but we have a least a couple of these things tied to the pier right across from all the submarines. This exact type of tug. I don’t know how you guys do it in Norfolk, and hopefully I’ll never find out.”  And

“It’s a security tug. Those protective barriers surrounding the water portion of the navy base don’t move themselves. It’s the equivalent of opening the gate for cattle to go in and out. Unlock it, unlatch it, swing it open, and close it when the ship has passed.    Source: Submariner.”

Is this true?  Is this really a USN commissioned vessel?

Thanks for reading and contributing, Xtian and Mike.

 

 

I appreciate it when folks send in photos they’ve taken.  Sharing photos is one of the joys of the Internet.

Here from Ashley Hutto, Mister Jim pushing five barges, upbound through the Highlands.  If you could swivel the camera to the right, you’d be looking at West Point.  I love the reality-defying lens.

The next two photos come from Phil Porteus . . .  you’re looking across a scrap barge at a set of barges filled with special Delaware Bay sand heading west in the  KVK and

pushed by the fairly new Daisy Mae.

From Jake van Reenen, this is what a small tug looks like on an Interstate, in this case before heading north mostly on I-95.  Photo taken in Miami.

From Sean McQuilken, it’s commissioning time for

USS Ralph Johnson, its namesake being a 19-year-old Marine who died in Vietnam in March 1968, a half century ago.

And last but not at all least, thanks to Hugo Sluimer via Fred Trooster, it’s the “US pilot boat” Elbe on the hard near Rotterdam.  Post-publication note:  Elbe WAS a pilot boat in the US, but she was way way more.  See here.

Many thanks to Ashley, Phil, Sean, and Fred.

 

Here are previous posts in this “whatzit” series, the most recent being components of The Vessel.

So what’s this craft below?

Well, back in September 2010, she was excursion vessel Commander running into the Hudson Highlands out of Haverstaw.  She nearly made it to 100 years in various excursion assignments after being launched in North Carolina in 1917 as SP-1247. 

I next saw her next to the marine railway in Greenport in May 2015, and then

she had quite the makeover on Staten Island and Brooklyn, converted into a floating marina building in front of Brooklyn Heights.  Quite the second . . .  or tenth life for this former naval vessel.  I do hope to see inside later this year.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Some government boats have jet drives.  In this post from early September 2014, the smaller vessel had jet drive, whereas the larger one–propellers, although I can find no info about , eg, their diameter.

The other day in the East River I encountered FDNY’s newest (?) vessel, William M. Feehan.  Click here for Feehan‘s dedication in the sixth boro.

Feehan‘s 3450 hp, generated by three Caterpillar C-18 engines, gets propelled by three HJ 403 Hamilton jets.

 

Speeds are slightly faster in fresh water, but both fresh and salt water need to be in liquid state.

USS Little Rock‘s 96,000 hp are to no avail when water converts to solid state, even with just some chunks of solid, because of the otherwise highly desirable waterjets. For complete specs on USS Little Rock LCS-9, click here.

The photo above comes via Marc Piché and was taken by René Beauchamp.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

For context in this series, IS2 is most explicit, but for fun, check them all here.  The photos in this series, all scans of slides,  were all taken after the late 1950s.

#1.  This is called Hudson raft-up.  My questions:  Can anyone identify the tug or at least its company?  Is that a steam crane on the nearest barge?

#2.  Lightship Scotland.  Click here for a great story about bypassing the fishing regulations in the vicinity of the Scotland light, named for a 19th century wreck at that location.   Some questions:  Is that the current Ambrose at South Street Seaport?   Which lighthouse/lightship tender would that have been in the New York Bight?  What might the smaller USCG vessel be?

#3.  USS Saratoga CV-60, launched NY Naval Shipyard in spring 1956, i.e., she was fairly new when this photo was taken. Only two more carriers would be built at New York Naval Shipyard in Brooklyn.  After service until 1994, she was decommissioned and plans were made to transform her into a museum, but those plans collapsed and she has been sent to scrap.   For photos by Birk Thomas of CV-60 departing for the scrapping, click here.

Many thanks to Ingrid Staats for allowing me to publish these photos here, where I hope group sourcing brings more info to light.

 

I observed all this from a public place which some of you will guess–since clues are all over this– but I won’t identify.

Security on the water caught my attention, as

did this large steel mammal swimming

along with the escort.

It was my lucky day.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Happy 4th of July!  Here’s the first post by this title with a story of what John Adams wrote Abigail around this time 241 years ago.

So why do we celebrate this day?  Uh . . . the British surrendered?  It marks the first battle for independence?

DDG-55 Stout  (photo taken May 20, 2015)

We got freedom to say what we want, pray to whomever we choose, buy as many guns as we want, refuse to be unreasonably searched, charged too much bail, have access to lawyers in court, and things like that?

The founders of the US signed the Declaration of Independence?

Nope!  Nope, nope.  None of those is correct.  The British didn’t surrender for another 6 years and didn’t vacate their occupation force from the sixth boro–the only boro then–until 1783.  The Constitution wasn’t written for another decade and some!!

Here’s a good quick “not fake” read for today called “9 Things You May Not Know About the  Declaration of Independence.”

I’ll get back to that . .  but what is that military gray ship over there trying to camouflage itself against Staten Island ferry orange?  I took the rest of these photos about 24 hours ago . . .   The flag at the stern is NOT US…

It’s French.  So maybe they’re here to help us  celebrate the contributions of Rochambeau, DeGrasse. and Lafayette?

Nope, they helped after 1776 . . ..  In fact the Alliance had not even existed yet for a few years .  . .

Well, maybe the crew of the French L 9032 is here to ride the NYWheel?

Nope.  That’s in some turmoil.

See the billboard there?  Maybe they’re here for “the lowest cost health plan?”

Maybe they’re here for Macy’s !!?  Rowland Hussey Macy WAS a sailor, after all;  the red Macy’s logo star was the tattoo he wore on his hand . . .

 

Actually  I have NO idea why FS Dumont D’Urville docked over at the old homeport yesterday . . .  maybe someone can illuminate us . . .?

But to get back to 4th July . . . here was the response of George III–the accused– to the Declaration:  I’d never read it until now and it’s short and precious and defensive!!

Here’s another 4 July tugster post from the archives . . .  And if you still have time to read, here are “Six things you (probably) didn’t know about the 4th July. . . .”  And the flag of that year?  Maybe here.  And the drink of choice to fete the day back then . . .?  Well, it was not beer or rum.  Rick Spilman has it here.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who offers another link to the big document of the day here, and wishes you a happy independence day.

 

In case you’re wondering which vessel(s) will be where, here’s the navy.mil listing.  These photos are ordered in the sequence they passed lower Manhattan.

USCGC Hamilton WMSL-753,less than three years old, is home-ported in Charleston  . . . and Seattle.   How does that work?

 

RV Neil Armstrong AGOR-27 replaced the venerable RV Knorr, mentioned here once some years back.

USS Kearsarge LHD 3, named for a mountain I climbed decades ago, is the fourth in a line of vessels named for the US warship commanded by John A. Winslow that sank Confederate raider CSS Alabama, two of whose crew were Raphael Semmes and Irving S. Bulloch,  off Cherbourg France in June 1864, less than a year before the end of the devastating US Civil War.  This account of the Battle of Cherbourg is worth a read.

 

Our friends to the North always have a representation, and HMCS Glace Bay MM 701 is this year’s.

Glace Bay‘s classmate Moncton appeared on this blog back in 2012 here.

Four YPs are in town from Annapolis. Here are some YP photos from two years ago, different perspective.

Here’s YP 705.

 

And finally USNS Yuma T-EPF-8 is without a doubt the newest vessel in this procession, having been accepted earlier in 2017.

I wonder who the photographer in the yellow foulies is.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will be wandering around town trying to get more closeups these next few days.  And below is another shot of USS Kearsarge.

Here are the posts I did each of the past two years.  I’ll call this the beginning of the processional.  How many government vessels do you count in the photo below?

Carefully screened support vessels--Rana Miller, Elizabeth McAllister, and Resolute— lead the procession, here past Ellis Island,

while small craft of the NYC Navy and Air Force and others patrol.

Other McAllister boats include Alex McAllister . . . and

Eric.

CG-56 USS San Jacinto leads the larger vessel contingent.  She was here as well in 2012.   Know the import of that location in April 1836?  

Tomorrow will feature close-ups of the rest of the fleet, but for now we’ll leave it here.

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who counts eight government craft in the first photo.  Here’s a post-fleet week photo set from 2009.

 

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