You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Tony A’ tag.

Thanks to Tony A, behold Patriot Marine’s Mulberry, still in the USAV livery from when she was ST-914

Photos are from New Haven, a port I’ve not visited, and with those raked masts . . . that appears to be Amistad along the shore in the distance.

I’ve looked unsuccessfully online for a list of USAV ST-900 series tugboats.  Anyone help?

Also, McCormack Boys has worked locally, ie, in the sixth boro, recently.

Here Boys tows some dredge equipment out of the KVK, as seen from a different angle.

Still another from Tony, Crosby Trojan appears to have done some assist work while in the sixth boro on its way to Maine. Trojan is currently enroute between Maine and Narragansett Bay.

 

I’m not sure which Genesis energy unit she is assisting.

And to close out this post, here’s an extraordinary set: USS Yorktown ( CG-48), a Ticonderoga-class cruiser being towed in the direction of the breakers in Brownsville by Miss Rui, which folks in the sixth boro might recognize as the former Norwegian Sea, and tailed by Annabelle Dorothy Moran, appears to be delayed.  As of this writing, she might be heading back to Philly.

Photos thanks to M’r Polychrome, who just happened to be transiting the area.

Miss Rui had been laid up herself near the Philadelphia Navy yard for some time before being purchased and rehabbed by Smith Maritime Ocean Towing & Salvage.

Many thanks to Tony a and M’r Polychrome for sending along these photos, extraordinary all.

I’m always so grateful when folks send me photos, especially like all of these.  Tony A catches all kinds of boats I miss, like

Anne-Sofie earlier this month in Albany.  I’m not sure what the cargo in and/or out was, but these SAL vessels get around.   Does anyone know if that “float” center just under the crane hook serves as an outrigger for loading/unloading crane movement?  As of this posting, she’s already in Genoa.

Here’s more from Tony . . . Dimuro Clark had been Turecamo Girls for over half a century and appeared on this blog many times. 

 

I like their logo.

And finally, long-time reader and sometimes contributor, Tommy Bryceland sends these photos of a local boat–which appeared in yesterday’s post–far from homewaters,

with guided missile frigate and ex USS Boone on the hip in Campbeltown Loch in Scotland last week.  Atlantic Salvor towed it there from the Philadelphia Navy Yard.  The ship is expected to be used as a target in an upcoming live fire exercise out in the Atlantic Ocean.  Would the frigate be anchored during such an exercise?  I’m imagining it’s expected to sink upon termination of the firing.

Many thanks to Tony A and Tommy for sharing these photos.

I’ve previously cited the line about eight million stories in the naked city, a reference to a 1948 movie and subsequent TV show.  More on all that at the end of this post, but for now, with the sixth boro added in, I’d double that number . . .  16 million stories in the naked city, considering all six boros.   And thanks to Tony, here are a bunch of stories from the past few days that I’d otherwise have missed entirely.

An Italian destroyer visited the sixth boro, D-554 Caio Duilio.

A Maine purse seiner Ocean Venture came through.  I caught her coming through the boro here two years ago. 

More on Ocean Venture can be found here on pp. 20-23 of March 2021 of National Fisherman.

And there’s more . .  all from the past week, name that tall ship with the flag of República Dominicana?

That’s Weeks James K in the foreground. 

So here it gets confusing;  it appears this DR training ship barquentine is called Cambiaso.  She was acquired from Bulgaria in August 2018.  However, it’s possible that for a short and unrecorded period of time, the same barquentine carried the name Maria Trinidad Sanchez.  What happened?  Was that simply a delivery name, or am I still showing effects of my time in the heat with the alligators while the robots attempted a coup?

That being said, along with a DR training ship, there was also another DR naval vessel.  Do her lines look familiar?

Vintage?  Where launched?

Today she’s known as DR’s Almirante Didiez Burgos.  But at launch in Duluth in 1943, she was USCGC Buttonwood, a WW2 veteran and now flagship of the DR Navy.  She reminds me of USCGC Bramble, which I saw way back when on the St. Clair River. After an epic journey from Michigan to Mississippi for refitting by a private individual, she might now be scrapped.

All photos by Tony A and shared with WVD, who feels privileged by this collaboration. 

I also think, given the reference to Naked City, that moving pictures producers should revisit the concept of a Route 66 series, incorporating Charles Kuralt’s influences.   Want the season 1 episode 1 of Route 66?  Click on the image below and prepare to go back in time for good or ill!  It’s disturbing watching.  Season 1 episode 1 provides some backstory about how a “broke” Manhattan kid came to be driving a 1960 Corvette.  Hint:  Hells Kitchen, the East River, barges, and bankruptcy are all involved.  A luminary of the series was screenwriter Stirling Silliphant, a name I should have known earlier. 

And to give equal time to Charles Kuralt, watch this 8-minute segment on wooden replica vessel building in Wisconsin.  Watch highlights as the boat builder, Ferd Nimphius, works on his 113th build.

 

 

Quick, name that boat.

It’s appeared on this blog before. 

She appeared here before as Charles Burton, but now . . .  meet Helen!

Cape Hatteras (1967) and Eugenie Moran (1966) have recently appeared over by Prall’s Island, regular spot for tugboats being prepared for reefing.   I caught Eugenie in Portsmouth NH over a decade ago here

Now over to the coast 3000 miles away, it’s C-tractor 22.  Thanks to JED, I rode out to sea with a previous generation C-tractor here over a decade ago. 

Many thanks to Tony A for all but the last photo, which was sent along by George Schneider.  Thanks to you both. 

And I’ll keep the lights on in tugster tower to keep juicing up the robots.

 

Let’s start with a photo by John “Jed” Jedrlinic, one of Alp Forward, currently off the eastern Scottish coast. She’s a 213′ x 61′ anchor handling tug from 2007  with over 200 tons bollard pull.

From there, let’s go to the Connecticut in US coast and some local boats with 

some Seakite by PanGeo Subsea gear aboard. I’d love to see what this package projects onto a screen. 

Both Berto L. and Josephine K Miller were up at Lew’s port earlier this spring.

GO Pursuit, fleet mate of GO America, called in there also. “GO” expands to Guice Offshore. 

The reminder of photos here come in the past days from Tony A, starting here with Deborah Quinn

He caught her several times in the East River, and here  

with an unidentified covered barge.   In the photo above, the Taco Cina sign intrigues me. 

In roughly the same stretch he passed Brinn Courtney, whom I’ve yet to see.

And finally, he noticed Nicholas Vinik doing the do si do with Sea Monster, moving her over near the Sandy Hook Pilots station.  I’m not sure what that means about Sea Monster.  Anyone know?  

Many thanks to Jed, Lew, and Tony A for sending along these photos. 

Meanwhile, the robots are still doing their unmonitored best at tugster tower while WVD is in the lowland of alligators, shrimp, sugar, fleur de lis and beaucoup de plus for an unspecified time.

 

aka “thanks to Tony A 34” is the best title for this, and I’m sure you’ll agree. 

If you’ve lost track, “exotic” is my term for unusual vessels calling in the sixth boro.  Although the series started with a workboat repurposed as a live aboard, in the past few years the term has evolved to categorize mostly vessels coming here in conjunction with special projects, many of which recently have been related to offshore wind farms.

I’m not sure why this boat is in town, and I believe the location is the CME Co. terminal (excuse me if I’m mistaken), but it truly fits the exotic category.

She’s a 300 class member of the Hornbeck Offshore (HOS) Mexico fleet, and not a new boat. A member the the 250 class was in the boro just over a half year ago here

I’m not sure how the naming convention for HOS works, but say hello to HOS Browning.

Many thanks to Tony A who sent this along by the robotic system some since 1990 have called the World Wide Web. 

Thanks to the robots in tugster tower who reconfigured the queue of scheduled posts.  WVD is sweating away in the land of alligators, shrimp, sugar, and beaucoup de plus.  Tony A is likely sweating away in the sixth boro; thanks to him for this reminder that in the boro which never really stops running, flooding , and ebbing, there truly are a million stories we never notice.  And let’s hear it for the robots who  . . . I don’t even know if they have sweat glands, or glands of any sort.   

Tony A has a sharp eye on the sixth boro traffic, like here, Durable, cable ship that worked off Fire Island for some time this spring.  I did catch Durable‘s fleet mate here a while back.   Durable was working on offshore wind farm elements, but has returned to the UK at this moment. 

He also caught Fort Point transiting the watery boro.

 

A first timer catch though is Miss Jean, a Louisiana-based boat likely working with a dredging company in the area.  

For a few more first-timers on the blog, check out David Steers and Benjamin D. Baxter, up along the Sound. 

So is this retired FDNY fireboat Alfred E. Smith under its own power?

Nope.  She’s at the end of a line towed by Jaguar, frequently towing “second-lives” vessels into or out of the sixth boro. 

Jaguar is a Gladding-Hearn product from 1978. 

And that’s a good place to hold it up.  Thanks much, Tony.  

And if winds are fair, tugster might just be back in the sixth boro soon. 

Tony A spends more time in the sixth boro than I do and sees stuff I don’t, for which I am grateful.  I’d noticed Zhen Hua 24 in Global on AIS, but I never saw the actual vessel;  Tony did on that rainy day a few days ago.   If you click on the link in the previous sentence, you’ll see the Zhen Hua fleet, which specializes in delivering cranes across oceans, has made previous trips to the sixth boro. 

With a half load of cranes, Zhen Hua 24 headed for sea, specifically to Côte d’Ivoire Terminal (CIT), Abidjan’s second container terminal.  So here’s my question, what did this Zhen Hua drop off in Bayonne?  More DSNY cranes maybe?

Meanwhile, over by Northeast Auto Terminal in Bayonne, is this a new set of straddle carriers, or are they just

parked in numerical order?

Meanwhile, Tony caught Acadia and

 

Liberian registry tug, since then bound for sea to an undisclosed location.  I’ve yet to see the Liberian registry painted on her stern. 

And while Tony was noticing all manner of unusual details around the sixth boro, check out Jane McAllister, now just plain Jane, soon-if-not-already bound for the Co-operative Republic of Guyana.

Since this post asks questions about a broad range of things, here’s another:  Is USGS the best organization in the sixth boro and associated waters to check for updates on water salinity in different locations?  Given the relationship between salinity and object buoyancy, I’d imagine it a good variable to know.

Many thanks to Tony A for sending along these dispatches from the sixth boro.

Thanks to Tony A and a new contributor, Ray M, here is more on the dispersal of the Bouchard fleet.  One boat has been renamed William F. Fallon Jr.  Know the boat?  Know the reference?  I’d say William F. Fallon Jr. is the newest name in the sixth boro.

Tony A sent the photo above and below, showing Susan Rose and Anna Rose.  Do you know their previous names?

Ray M got some closer up photos of the stern of Anna Rose yesterday. 

The barge used to be the 2012  B. No. 250.  More on that and her 2019 sister 252 here. 

And how new is the paint on that name?  Well . . . isn’t that masking tape beside the letters?

Many thanks to Tony A and Ray M for use of these photos.

Here’s more on William F. Fallon Jr:  the namesake was a Port Authority manager who died on 9/11.  The vessel used to be J. George Betz and has been purchased by Centerline Logistics.

Susan used to be Evening Breeze and Anna used to be Jane A. Bouchard.

Unrelated:  Greenpeace is in the sixth boro, protesting Russian crude deliveries here, allowed by the sanctions.  Here is a Greenpeace tracker that follows some of the tankers that have departed Russian ports with petro cargo since the attack on Ukraine began.

 

We’ll go back to Albert Gayer‘s 1950s Barge Canal photos soon, but today it’s back to some 2022 sixth boro shots from Tony A.

Any guesses on what Osprey is moving on that deck barge?  I’ll share my thoughts at the end of the post. 

Here’s a new boat for the sixth boro . . .

Sitka, formerly K-Sea’s Tiger, a boat that worked several decades on the other side of the continent but had me wondering.

 

Many thanks to Tony for all his photos, but especially his knack for catching the unusual.

My hunch on that orange device on the deck barge in the first two photos–and Tony concurs–it’s a hyperbaric chamber.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,562 other followers
If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Documentary "Graves of Arthur Kill" is AVAILABLE again here.Click here to buy now!

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

September 2022
M T W T F S S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930