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Tony A has a sharp eye on the sixth boro traffic, like here, Durable, cable ship that worked off Fire Island for some time this spring.  I did catch Durable‘s fleet mate here a while back.   Durable was working on offshore wind farm elements, but has returned to the UK at this moment. 

He also caught Fort Point transiting the watery boro.

 

A first timer catch though is Miss Jean, a Louisiana-based boat likely working with a dredging company in the area.  

For a few more first-timers on the blog, check out David Steers and Benjamin D. Baxter, up along the Sound. 

So is this retired FDNY fireboat Alfred E. Smith under its own power?

Nope.  She’s at the end of a line towed by Jaguar, frequently towing “second-lives” vessels into or out of the sixth boro. 

Jaguar is a Gladding-Hearn product from 1978. 

And that’s a good place to hold it up.  Thanks much, Tony.  

And if winds are fair, tugster might just be back in the sixth boro soon. 

Tony A spends more time in the sixth boro than I do and sees stuff I don’t, for which I am grateful.  I’d noticed Zhen Hua 24 in Global on AIS, but I never saw the actual vessel;  Tony did on that rainy day a few days ago.   If you click on the link in the previous sentence, you’ll see the Zhen Hua fleet, which specializes in delivering cranes across oceans, has made previous trips to the sixth boro. 

With a half load of cranes, Zhen Hua 24 headed for sea, specifically to Côte d’Ivoire Terminal (CIT), Abidjan’s second container terminal.  So here’s my question, what did this Zhen Hua drop off in Bayonne?  More DSNY cranes maybe?

Meanwhile, over by Northeast Auto Terminal in Bayonne, is this a new set of straddle carriers, or are they just

parked in numerical order?

Meanwhile, Tony caught Acadia and

 

Liberian registry tug, since then bound for sea to an undisclosed location.  I’ve yet to see the Liberian registry painted on her stern. 

And while Tony was noticing all manner of unusual details around the sixth boro, check out Jane McAllister, now just plain Jane, soon-if-not-already bound for the Co-operative Republic of Guyana.

Since this post asks questions about a broad range of things, here’s another:  Is USGS the best organization in the sixth boro and associated waters to check for updates on water salinity in different locations?  Given the relationship between salinity and object buoyancy, I’d imagine it a good variable to know.

Many thanks to Tony A for sending along these dispatches from the sixth boro.

Thanks to Tony A and a new contributor, Ray M, here is more on the dispersal of the Bouchard fleet.  One boat has been renamed William F. Fallon Jr.  Know the boat?  Know the reference?  I’d say William F. Fallon Jr. is the newest name in the sixth boro.

Tony A sent the photo above and below, showing Susan Rose and Anna Rose.  Do you know their previous names?

Ray M got some closer up photos of the stern of Anna Rose yesterday. 

The barge used to be the 2012  B. No. 250.  More on that and her 2019 sister 252 here. 

And how new is the paint on that name?  Well . . . isn’t that masking tape beside the letters?

Many thanks to Tony A and Ray M for use of these photos.

Here’s more on William F. Fallon Jr:  the namesake was a Port Authority manager who died on 9/11.  The vessel used to be J. George Betz and has been purchased by Centerline Logistics.

Susan used to be Evening Breeze and Anna used to be Jane A. Bouchard.

Unrelated:  Greenpeace is in the sixth boro, protesting Russian crude deliveries here, allowed by the sanctions.  Here is a Greenpeace tracker that follows some of the tankers that have departed Russian ports with petro cargo since the attack on Ukraine began.

 

We’ll go back to Albert Gayer‘s 1950s Barge Canal photos soon, but today it’s back to some 2022 sixth boro shots from Tony A.

Any guesses on what Osprey is moving on that deck barge?  I’ll share my thoughts at the end of the post. 

Here’s a new boat for the sixth boro . . .

Sitka, formerly K-Sea’s Tiger, a boat that worked several decades on the other side of the continent but had me wondering.

 

Many thanks to Tony for all his photos, but especially his knack for catching the unusual.

My hunch on that orange device on the deck barge in the first two photos–and Tony concurs–it’s a hyperbaric chamber.

Thanks for sending photos along.  Capt. Jack Aubrey sent this along from Baltimore.  He says, “The ship name and the assembled team almost looks set up.   L to R: Eric, Timothy and Bridget McAllister.” 

It really does.  I’ll bet Pretty Team could travel all the English-speaking ports of the world and highlight all the great and pretty teams.  At the moment, she’s still looking to pose with more teams in Baltimore.

Given the cold weather today,  Tim Powell sent along these next photos from near Ottawa IL, midpoint on the Illinois River between Chicago and Peoria.  Tim writes:  “Once again I had the opportunity to serve my beloved transportation industry. On 01/05/2022 we delivered a load to the towboat MV Brian NapackB&M Midstream is a full service family owned company. It was a chilly 10 degrees on the Illinois River in Ottawa Ill, with a 20 to 30 mph wind.” 

When they receive an order, B&M Midstream goes to the nearest boat ramp, launches the boat,

comes in alongside,

transfers the supplies,

 

and then hauls the supply boat back onto the trailer. I guess the windows would clear once it warmed up, but the internet tells me it’s about that same temperature in that part of the Illinois River today.

And finally, Capt. Tony A caught Susan Rose –ex-Evening Breeze–the other days, and a bit later,

he caught J. George Betz in mid-paint transformation to Betz the Centerline boat.  Watch for the lion to go on the stack. 

Many thanks to Tony, Tim, and Jack for sharing these photos.  I’ll keep my eyes open for more Pretty ships.  Here‘s another one.

 

 

 

 

The year is in its last hours, and these vessels saw their last hours in this year as well.  Of course, this is a subjective list, made up of mostly photos I’ve taken over the years of sixth boro and Great Lakes vessels. This list is not definitive.  If you know of others, you might add them in the comments section.

Many photos of Helen McAllister have appeared here over the years, but time caught up with the 1900 Helen, who began and ended her life on Staten Island.  I caught her doing her last dance –a tango or a waltz– here.

More than 10 years of silence passed between the photo above at the McAllister NY yard and the one below in Tottenville.  Eagle-eyed Tony A. caught her stripped of her identification and ready for the scrapping jaws last month.

The 1907 Pegasus saw her end this year as well.  I spent many hours on Pegasus, and regretfully, sometimes the scrappers’ jaws are the most humane end for boats. 

The 1970 Joanne Reinauer III also saw its end.  I learned a lot about the modifications made to tugboat from her and from photos of her tranformations supplied by readers.  My photo below is from 2009.

The 1972 Viking also saw a series of modifications.  You might think a powerful machine like this . . . like these . . . would never wear out, but like you and me, they do.  I believe it was 2021 that she was scrapped, but it may have been earlier.  The photo below is from the September 5, 2010 tugboat race.

The Great Lakes shed some vessels also.  Mississagi began work in 1943.  I took the photo in Lake St. Clair in August 2016. She was towed to a Sault Ste. Marie scrapyard in October 2021.

Manistee dates from the same year and has the same dimensions–620′ x 60′– as Mississagi.  This photo I took in Toledo, where she had been laid up for some time.  More on Manistee here.

Ojibway, a 1952 bulker, is currently underway in the Saint Lawrence River, bound for Port Cartier with a load of grain.  After that, she’ll lay up awaiting an uncertain future.   For what it’s worth, she came off the ways the year I was born.

And on a sad note, the 1975 St. Clair was relatively new for a Great Lakes bulk carrier, but a devastating fire during winter layup  in February 2019 condemned her; she arrived at the scrapyard in Port Colborne just a few weeks ago. Photo here is credited to Corey Hammond.

Thanks to Tony and Corey for their photos;  all others, WVD, who wishes you all a healthy and happy 2022 and the fulfillment of all your goals.

And unrelated to this post but entirely germane to this day of reflection/new goal setting before a new year, check out Ellen Magellan’s expeditions.  That’s not her real name but it’s so clever I wish I’d come up with it. 

 

Many thanks to Tony A for these photos.  As it turns out, the Bouchard fleet is dispersing, and eight of the boats at least have names like

Susan Rose, formerly Evening Breeze.  The explanation is that these boats are now assets of Rose Cay, LLC.  Their saltwater name notwithstanding, given a look at their website, I’d never guess they have taken over a large percentage of the former Bouchard fleet.  They are an investment group.  And their statement of “real asset special situations targeting ESG forward investments” requires some explanation;  ESG is “environmental, social, and governance,” itself an opaque string.

Getting together a set of formerly Bouchard, now Rose Cay boats might be an interesting group sourcing project.  You can help by sending me a photo(s) of the former Bouchard boats with new names.

Here’s a list to date that I know of: 

Bouchard Girls is Joan Rose,

Brendan J. Bouchard is now Cindy Rose,

Danielle M. Bouchard is now Rebekah Rose,

Evening Star is now Jordan Rose,

Kim M. Bouchard  is now Lynn M. Rose,  [I’ve never seen Kim ]

Jane A. Bouchard  is now Anna Rose,

Morton S. Bouchard IV is now Jesse Rose. 

Thanks to Tony A for these photos;  any errors  . . .  WVD.

 

Postcards is the 9/11 memorial I visit most.  I was there just a week ago;  this is looking mostly north from Staten Island. 

From the water at night for a short period of time, a Tribute in Light can also be seen.  This is looking SW from the East River.

RIP.

Many thanks to Tony A for sending the night photo along.

Hawsepiper Paul is writing about this subject all along, as you might expect since he lives most of his days on a bunker barge.

Indulge me a bit as I elaborate on these adventures, as captured in photos by Tony A, starting with this one. When does a New York port of registry seem out of place?

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I’d say when it’s painted onto a vessel never or rarely seen in New York, and of course I know that with flags of convenience . . . anything is possible with arcane finagling.

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To appear to digress a little bit more, Marcus G Langseth is to 2014 as Robert G Conrad was to –say– 1980.  Conrad is a photo I copied from Seth Tane‘s archives a little over a year ago when I did the “fifth dimension” series on the sixth boro.

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Langseth is currently working off Atlantic City, one of its nearer peregrinations.

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Anyhow, about two weeks ago Tony A and Patrick Sky got to deliver fuel to this international wanderer.

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A little over an hour later, Patrick Sky, feeling much lighter, pulls away from this dock underneath Throgs Neck  (which autocorrect insists should be spelled “throb’s neck,” but that would take us into adventures in spell auto correcting, which I’d much rather avoid.

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Many thanks to Tony A and to Seth Tane for use of these photos.   Happy scientific gallivanting for LDEO, Marcus G Langseth named for this Tennessee-born earth scientist.

 

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