You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘visiting foreign naval vessels’ category.

Ford here refers to USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78), currently operating on her initial voyage ever,  along with foreign naval vessels, somewhere in the western Atlantic.  Here, two of those, frigates, made their way northbound across the Upper Bay shortly after daybreak earlier this week.

Identify the flag on the stern?

HNLMS De Zeven Provinciën (F-802) was the first of a four-vessel class;  others of the class called in the sixth boro here in 2009 and here in 2019.

Following F-802 was an older M-class frigate, HNMLS Van Amstel (F-831), the last remaining HNMLS of that class.  More on that class here.

Might that be one of her own RIBs escorting her in.

 

 

I’d missed the first of those vessels coming in, so later I hiked up to the passenger terminal to get this shot. 

Can you identify this flag?

It’s Danish frigate HDMS Peter Willemoes (F-362).

Namesakes for these three vessels are as follows:    F-802 namesake was the flagship of a Dutch admiral, F-831… a captain, and F-362 … an officer who fell in battle at age 24. An image of De Ruyter’s flagship as rendered by William van de Velde the Younger or Cornelis P. de Mööy can be seen here.

All photos, any errors, WVD.

Unrelated but fascinating:  An earlier HNMLS vessel named De Zeven Provinciën was deliberately bombed by the Dutch themselves to put down a mutiny on board in 1933.  See the story and related thoughts on mutiny here.

The sixth boro and other harbors have those vessels that seem to hide in plain sight.  Maybe it’s more accurate to say these craft, like the one below,  are visible but their usage might not be so clear.   

Here’s how Annie Moore gets described:  “a utility vessel for the National Park Service designed to transport national and international VIPs to the Statue of Liberty.”   That’s vague and not vague at the same time.  Who are these national and international VIPs, I wonder. 

Here’s more:  “to transport VIPs, official passengers, supplies and equipment to Ellis Island from Battery Park, New York, NY.”    Only Battery Park?  Some contradictions exist in these two pubs.

As many questions as I have with Annie Moore, when HOS Browning came back into port after some days offshore, I have even more.

 I know what the boat does, but I crave specifics.  For HOS Browning, I’d like to know where they went, why that location, what specifically was accomplished with which tools and to what end . . . .

In port, what and who leaves the ship and what and who comes aboard?  Maybe that makes me a landlubber with too much time on my hands . . . .  Who are the crew?

See the name on the bow of the high speed vessel below?  Clearly, it’s not THIS Sea Vixen,  but somewhere in the weapons “kit” carried on Ro8 HMS QE is an enterprise called Project Vixen, involving aerial drones, and named for the de Havilland DH.110 Sea Vixen carrier-based fleet air-defense fighter.  

Technically, the vessel above and below is a 43′ PTB, a personnel transport boat, and  “the HMS Queen Elizabeth class will each carry four PTBs made by Blyth-based company Alnmaritec. Each 13.1 m (43 ft) long PTB carries 36 passengers and two crew to operate the vessel.”  Find more photos here.

The PTB seemed to be flitting all around the boro, checking out the sights.  Who gets to ride the Sea Vixen and who the larger sixth boro-based PTB, whose name I didn’t catch.

Why those sights?  Had HMS Prince of Wales come to town as planned, it would have had evolved PTBs, such as the one here

All photos, any errors, WVD, who’s always looking for novelty.

I had a different post and an entirely different morning planned, until I looked at AIS, and saw that after almost exactly four years, Big Lizzie (HMS Ro8) was inbound.  So whose was this when 

these were coming into view?

More specifics in the link above the first photo, but check out the info here

“But sir, I’ve been fighting this trophy striper . . . !”

 

Notice Stockham (T-AK-3017) in the distance?

 

Why eight?

Danmark, owned by the Danish Maritime Authority,  is simply called that;  although a naval training ship, it does not go by Margrethe II.   More photos of Danmark appeared own this blog earlier this week. 

 

Note a second helicopter now?

 

Wednesday and Thursday the “Atlantic Future Forum” will occur no doubt right  there. 

Kirby has the stern as they Ro8 enters the nUpper Bay.

HMS Richmond (F239) escorts Queen Elizabeth in. 

All photos, any errors, WVD.

 

I’ve previously cited the line about eight million stories in the naked city, a reference to a 1948 movie and subsequent TV show.  More on all that at the end of this post, but for now, with the sixth boro added in, I’d double that number . . .  16 million stories in the naked city, considering all six boros.   And thanks to Tony, here are a bunch of stories from the past few days that I’d otherwise have missed entirely.

An Italian destroyer visited the sixth boro, D-554 Caio Duilio.

A Maine purse seiner Ocean Venture came through.  I caught her coming through the boro here two years ago. 

More on Ocean Venture can be found here on pp. 20-23 of March 2021 of National Fisherman.

And there’s more . .  all from the past week, name that tall ship with the flag of República Dominicana?

That’s Weeks James K in the foreground. 

So here it gets confusing;  it appears this DR training ship barquentine is called Cambiaso.  She was acquired from Bulgaria in August 2018.  However, it’s possible that for a short and unrecorded period of time, the same barquentine carried the name Maria Trinidad Sanchez.  What happened?  Was that simply a delivery name, or am I still showing effects of my time in the heat with the alligators while the robots attempted a coup?

That being said, along with a DR training ship, there was also another DR naval vessel.  Do her lines look familiar?

Vintage?  Where launched?

Today she’s known as DR’s Almirante Didiez Burgos.  But at launch in Duluth in 1943, she was USCGC Buttonwood, a WW2 veteran and now flagship of the DR Navy.  She reminds me of USCGC Bramble, which I saw way back when on the St. Clair River. After an epic journey from Michigan to Mississippi for refitting by a private individual, she might now be scrapped.

All photos by Tony A and shared with WVD, who feels privileged by this collaboration. 

I also think, given the reference to Naked City, that moving pictures producers should revisit the concept of a Route 66 series, incorporating Charles Kuralt’s influences.   Want the season 1 episode 1 of Route 66?  Click on the image below and prepare to go back in time for good or ill!  It’s disturbing watching.  Season 1 episode 1 provides some backstory about how a “broke” Manhattan kid came to be driving a 1960 Corvette.  Hint:  Hells Kitchen, the East River, barges, and bankruptcy are all involved.  A luminary of the series was screenwriter Stirling Silliphant, a name I should have known earlier. 

And to give equal time to Charles Kuralt, watch this 8-minute segment on wooden replica vessel building in Wisconsin.  Watch highlights as the boat builder, Ferd Nimphius, works on his 113th build.

 

 

I’m just observing, not criticizing, but the vessel turnout in 2022 seems quite small. I understand that lots of other things are happening globally.   Following USS Bataan, USCGC Sycamore (WLB-209) and HMS Protector (A-173) arrive.  They are both about 20 years in service and have both done assignments in the Arctic.

Sycamore made a run up to the GW before turning around. I saw her here in the sixth boro just over a year ago.

Protector did not begin life as a UK Royal Navy ice patrol vessel.  Rather, it was built as the 2001 Polarbjørn in Lithuania for GC Rieber, a Norwegian company based in Bergen, a port I visited way back in 1985, on one of my early gallivants.  Unfortunately, in those days I traveled sans camera.

 

 

USCGC Dependable (WMEC-626) built at AmShip in Lorain OH and commissioned in 1968,  is over the midcentury mark and still at work.  AmShip Lorain-closed since the early 1980s-  built some icons, several of their lakers still very much in active service.

 

Most of the medium endurance cutters of Dependable‘s cohort-Reliance class– are still in service, either in the US or elsewhere.

 

 

USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) was commissioned in 2015.   Like Sycamore and Dependable, she was built on the Great Lakes

Four years ago here, I visited the Marinette Shipyard town where Milwaukee came into existence. Some products of Marinette include Sycamore–above–and Ellen McAllister, also involved in Wednesday’s parade into the sixth boro. Katherine Walker, part of the welcoming committee Wednesday, is another Marinette product, as are some of the current Staten island ferries (Molinari class) and some ATBs, like Brandywine and Christiana that pass through the port now and then.

 

As Milwaukee steamed upriver, she slowed and spun a 180 turn much faster than I imagined possible for a 378′ vessel.   I wish I’d been on shore just off her improvised turning basin when she did so. Was anyone there and can send photos?

A sister of Milwaukee, USS Duluth (LCS 21) was commissioned in her namesake city only earlier this week.

All photos, WVD, who hopes to get in some more Fleet Week sights this weekend.  If you’re reading this and arrived in the sixth boro–aka the primary boro–of NYC, welcome. 

 

 

May 2012 was a month of verticality, as in these twin tugboats,

as in the towers of these bridges with a low, long riverboat transiting beneath, and

and in the 156′ air draft of this mega yacht once owned by one of the oligarch’s now sanctioned and hiding his other yachts wherever he can.

It was also time for Opsail 2012, the sixth of six such events to date. 

I recall an evening sail around Gravesend Bay one May evening to see some of the tall ships that overnighted there prior to parading into the confines of the sixth boro.

Above and below were tall ships from Colombia, Ecuador, Indonesia, Mexico, and Brasil.

 

 

 

The tall ships have scattered to the seven seas, but these tugs each returns to the sixth boro as work dictates.

All photos, WVD.

 

 

From a shipyard near the Black Sea, this very “white” Holland-class offshore patrol ship came into the sixth boro a day or so ago.   A lot needs to be unpacked in that sentence, so here goes:

a Royal Netherlands Navy vessel identified as P842, third in a class of four which began with P840 (shown here in a 2016 tugster post) and named for the province(s) of Holland (a North Holland and a South Holland province exist), was built by a Damen shipyard on the Romanian Danube port city of Galați, Romania.  P842, named for the province of Friesland (see the banner on the gangway above), was delivered to the Royal Netherlands Navy almost exactly 10 years ago. I quote from the wikipedia article here:  she is “painted a new light blue-gray color, which supposedly has a better camouflage-effect than the standard light-grey paint used by other RNLN ships.”  Yes, there are many grades of “white.”

As to the stealth design, it reminds me of a French vessel that was in nearly the same location a warm April a dozen years ago. Other Dutch navy ships going back 14 years and including a submarine in the sixth boro can be seen here.  Other Damen-built vessels can be seen here.

I’m just conjecturing here, but based on the image of P840 in a link above, the ship color a decade ago was the same as that of the small boat here on the davit. 

To bring out that light blue-gray color, let me close with a slightly adjusted version of the top photo.  Maybe time for some new paint.

All photos, WVD.

Skimming through the information about Galați, Romania, and looking at the mouths of the Danube have given me a much more complex appreciation of the history and geography of the countries around even only this part of the Black Sea, a place very much in the news these days.   This might be an interesting river tour, although it does not go all the way to the Black Sea.  Maybe someone can tell if tours exist that continue from Bucharest to –say–Istanbul.

As you read this, I’m west of the Mississippi following the muddy tributary of the muddy Mississip, but I thought I’d remotely set signals to go up.  Here’s a WW2 story that intersects the sixth boro in a way I’d never heard . .  .  the Chicago museum I and most of you know as U-505 spent some time in the the sixth boro as USS Nemo, and I don’t mean the Florida eatery.  Note that there’s no mention of USS Nemo in this wikipedia account.

Click on the grainy b/w image of the Moran tugboat with the submarine below to get the story.

Hat tip to Bill Orzell for this story;  here are more of his stories in New York Almanack.

And here’s my question:  has any seen photos of USS Nemo in the sixth boro?

Click here for photos of and links to previous submarines I’ve encountered in NY waters since beginning this blog.

 

 

Thanks to Tony A, let’s play “name that ship.”

Photos were taken near the “banana pier” yesterday, and as of this writing this morning, the vessel is still there, but here’s your chance to use your search skills to identify it:  there’s a number, a flag, and of course a color.

 

Many thanks to Tony A for these shots.

And the answer is ORP Wodnick, currently a Polish training ship.  In the past, this 1975 training ship has served, among other missions, as a hospital ship.

I don’t know Polish, but it appears that “wodn” is the root word for “water”, and “wodnick” might mean “waterline.”  ORP expands to Okręt Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej  and translates as “Polish warship.”

 

Last week featured a few photos of HMS Dragon over by the Manhattan passenger terminal.  Those photos prompted these from a tug captain on the Clyde, who attended the launch of the vessel back just over 11 years ago.

Click here and, with the magic of YouTube,  you see video of the launch AND the tug, with music.

Here mere seconds before the first splash, the tug has moved away .  .

 

Now the tug moves back in to tether the dragon to grab the bridle and

lead it to a dock.

All photos by Capt. Tommy Bryceland, whose photos have previous appeared here.

 

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