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This post, beginning with Miriam Moran juxtaposed with downtown Newark NJ, is intended to demonstrate just how diverse the sixth boro is, in terms of vessels and shorelines. Has Miriam been in the sixth boro all of its 40-year career?

Ernest Campbell is 10 years older than Miriam, and did the better part of a decade up in Alaska.

Sapphire Coast, stemming here in the East River just off Rockefeller University, was launched in 1982.

In the KVK, Stephen B, 1983,  is trying to pass as Hen B.

Pacific Reliance, launched in 2006, was designed for long hauls.

Kenny G, in its distinctive blue livery, has appeared on this blog several times, but I’ve never learned where and when she was built.  Here she’s working on refurbishing to Pier 40.  Check out this link to Pier 40 as a prep to a series I’m starting in a few days.

At one point, C. F. Campbell was in the same fleet as the vessels that became DonJon’s Atlantic Salvor and Atlantic Enterprise.

And finally, it’s Harbor II, as before, in the Harlem River with the 44th precinct NYPD station in the background.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Let’s start with Alice Oldendorff, inbound with a hold full of Nova Scotia stone and about to turn to starboard on her (almost) final approach to Brooklyn.   Alice and I have a long history.

YM Wind makes the final approach her into Global Terminals, her first call at sixth boro docks.  In contrast above, Alice has already made hundreds of calls here, always transporting aggregates. Visible assisting Wind are Alex McAllister and Ava M. McAllister.

E. R. Montecito is a large ship, but containers are stacked 17 across, versus 20 across for Wind above.

Undine here takes on bunkers and other supplies.  The small black/red/white vessel long her stern is Twin Tube, the venerable 1951 harbor supply vessel. In dry dock in the distance it’s USNS Sisler.

MOL Emissary travels the last few miles before Port Elizabeth.

Uniquely named tanker Forties waits in the Stapleton anchorage.

COSCO Vietnam enters the Kills and passes Houston at the dock.

Since Kriti Amber is Greek-flagged, I’m guessing that’s a variation on “Crete,” but that only conjecture.

QM2 takes on fuel while transferring passengers on the port side.

And let’s call it a day with Unique Explorer.

All photos recently by Will Van Dorp, who considers himself fortunate to live in this large port.

 

It’s that time again . . .  a glance back at exactly a decade ago.  Back in June 2009, the 400th anniversary of the Half Moon going up the Hudson kicked off with a 20th century version of the Half Moon going up the Hudson.  Note the banner hung to the old TZ Bridge along the right side of the photo.   That replica is now in the Netherlands, looking for a new home, and that bridge–parts of it–have become fish structure somewhere off Long Island.

A newish boat in town was Peter F. Gellatly, now Vane’s Long Island.

Bounty–alas her fate–was still an irregular visitor to the sixth boro.  Here she’s made up to Harvey just outboard of Frying Pan.

Brian Nicholas moves a scrap barge out of the East River.

Paul T. Moran made one of her really rare visits to the sixth boro.

Container vessels calling in the ports of NY and NJ had not yet become UL . . .  ultra large versions

Harvey follows Half Moon northbound on the Hudson.

Michigan Service and Erie Service gather near IMTT.

Sisters assists with a tanker, and

here’s more of the River Day procession marking the year of Half Moon the first.

All photos taken in June 2009 by Will Van Dorp.

While waiting for Triton, I had a surprise, a big pink surprise.  I hope someone gets photos of Triton when she departs.

But here, 24 days and 13 hours out of Singapore,

it’s

ONE Apus, which rhymes with “tape us.”  Since she’s a duplicate, I think, of ONE Stork, I assumed an apus referred to a bird in some language.  Any guesses?

Here are my first photos of ONE Stork.

 

See that messenger line coming down to send up

the big  line?

It turns out that “apus” is the Latin word for the common swift, a fantastic name for a ULCV.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s minutes late for the noontime posting.

Ten years ago I did a series called “meditations” as I was pitching about to structure my days.  The series was keyed to the alphabet, A to Z.  The L meditation focused on “line.”    Picking this back up has been prompted by the photo below.

Notice anything unusual about the line seen here?  By the way, CS Peony was underway when I took the photo.

Contrast the line in the images above and below.  Notice how taut the one from the OOCL ship is.

See the somewhat diagonal line between the port side of the green vessel and the Moran tug?  It’s tightly stretched.

Below . . .  both lines are tight.

Ditto . . . below.

And along the other side of CS Peony . . .  bar tight.

In a different context, a tightrope walker like Philippe Petit could navigate that non-sagging line.

But here . . . I find this unusual.

Any ideas?

Photos and observations by Will Van Dorp.

 

By the way, did anyone get good photos of Triton, the biggest of the big ULCVs to call in the sixth boro so far?  She was coming under the Bayonne Bridge as first light was breaking.  More on that ULCV at the end of this post.

Let me start with two photos I took in Quebec City, over two years ago.

What caught my attention was the Tanzania registry.

Earlier this week I caught the “rest of the story” on this ship while reading the CBC online.  Click on the photo below of the captain to learn why this ship has not moved in over two years, a crew not shanghai’d but rather quebec’d or rather bahamian’d or most accurately, D & D maritime’d….

Now for some random ship traffic in the sixth boro, which no doubt has its own untold stories, how about this long glance at NYK Falcon, fleet mate of ONE Stork and one of the big birds of the harbor.

STI Leblon, a Brazilian reference,  heads out with an assist from Miriam Moran.  Here are many more STI tankers.

Genco Avra gets a partial load over in Greenville.

Nordmaple heads for sea.

Beauforte heads in, as does

Ems Trader.  Ems is a river reference, not an abbreviation.  Mary Turecamo is off her stern.

Did anyone get close-ups of Triton this morning?  I’d love to see them;  meanwhile, I’m hoping to catch her on the way out to sea, unless she leaves in the wee dark hours.  Port of Baltimore has made a big deal about this record-breaking vessel, as did the Panama Canal folks.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Thanks to Joseph Chomicz, it’s Capt. Latham in Port Elizabeth .  .  .

standing by the barge Atlanta Bridge . . .  So here’s my question . . . and answer will be located at the end of this post . . .  in quo vadis?

I’ve not seen this boat in a while . . . the 1958 Blount-built Vulcan III.

 

The “D” stands for Derrick Marine of Perth Amboy.

The current Kristin Poling stands by as Aramon is lightered before it enters the Kills.

Doris Moran moves Portland into the Kills, headed here for Shooters Island before following the channel around to the north.

Jonathan and JRT make their way home after an assist.

Mary Turecamo assists a lightered Aramon to a berth on the Arthur Kill.

Many thanks to Joe for the Capt. Latham pics;  all others by Will Van Dorp, who lacked his real camera to document the answer to the “where goest they?” question above.

Some older cargo cranes go San Juan-bound aboard Atlanta Bridge between Capt. Latham and Atlantic Enterprise.

Memorial Day weekend 2019 . . .  and we should all remember the meaning, whether we’re working or vacating from work.

You can read the names on the vessels or on the tags.

 

 

 

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’d included no links in this post except the one that follows and which I hope you read in its entirety here.

It’s that time of year.

Some small commercial fishing boats do stay around in winter, but

I don’t recall seeing Never Enuff in frigid weather.

Catamarans like Good Karma might sail all winter, but down south ….

 

Jackie C . . . a dive boat?

 

I didn’t catch a name on this trap boat.

 

Nor here . . . .

Twisted Sisters has a load of traps.

 

I caught the name here . . . Renegade.

But not here . . .. although I know it’s a Florida Bay Coaster,

which is roomy inside but insignificant when juxtaposed with a 1200′ ULCV.

And then there are the jet skis . . .

….

This process of assembling this post has suggested a new

series, a summer series

called Mixed Craft, mixed use of the waterways.  Be safe.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Ships of all sorts call in the sixth boro.  Quick  post today . . .  showing a range of recent callers.

MSC Zlata R,

Grande Torino,

 

Gerhard Schulte, 

 

Elbeborg,

 

and Adrian Maersk . . . each with a smaller vessel.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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