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Ships of all sorts call in the sixth boro.  Quick  post today . . .  showing a range of recent callers.

MSC Zlata R,

Grande Torino,

 

Gerhard Schulte, 

 

Elbeborg,

 

and Adrian Maersk . . . each with a smaller vessel.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

For folks who’ve been watching sixth boro traffic much longer than I have, Lyman must conjure up a sense of ressursction that I don’t have whenever I see the profile.  Then called Crusader, she was tripped by her barge and sank just over 30 years ago.  I’ve almost always seen her with

barge Sea Shuttle, towing sections of subs. For a spectacular view of this tow in the East River seven years ago click here.

Rockefeller University’s River Campus makes an unusual backdrop here for Foxy 3.   See the support structure for the campus being lifted from the River here.

Treasure Coast . . .  offhand, do you know the build date?

Carolina Coast,

with sugar barge Jonathan, which you’ve seen some years ago here as Falcon.

Pearl Coast with a cement barge off the Narrows remaking the tow to enter the Upper Bay.

In the rain, it’s Genesis Victory and Scott Turecamo, and their respective barges.

Franklin Reinauer heads out with RTC 28, and heading in it’s

Kimberly Poling with Noelle Cutler.

And let’s stop here with JRT assisting Cosco Faith.

All photos recently by Will Van Dorp, who’s been inland for a week now and sees Shelia Bordelon on AIS at the Stapleton pier this morning.   Anyone get photos?

 

 

 

Spring and fog coexist a lot, and from there, the gradation from fog to summer haze is somewhat blurred.  Blue-hulled Oyster Catcher, in the foreground, gives clearest indication that this in not a black/white/gray photo.  I’ve searched online fruitlessly to confirm that Oyster Catcher is an NYC DEP vessel.  When

A panoply of vessels converge in the Narrows as the great gray ULCV approaches from many days at sea.

 

I’ve not been paying attention to how many of these ULCVs have multiple bow thrusters.  Anyone know the horsepower on each?

 

 

 

Three 6000s, one 3900, and two brants . . . all converging along with Cosco Faith.

For scale, notice the 25′-to 30′ outboard passing just to the right of the letter O in COSCO.  More to scale, note the size of engineering crew next to this crankshaft.

I waited for a messenger line for the deckhand to send up the towline, but  . . . it happened after they were out of range for me.

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All the photos in this post I took over a two-hour period Friday.  I post this in part in response to the question raised by a commenter recently, how many tugboats operate in the sixth boro, aka the waters around NYC.

They pass one at a time,

you see them in twos . . . . and that might be a third with the crane barge off the Battery in the distance,

a trio might be assisting a single ULCV,

foreshortening might collapse four into a single shot, and

if you look across the repair and docking yard, you might see five tugs plus one science boat.

And finally for now, move the huge box ship away, and six of more are revealed.

This is the sixth boro, folks, one of the busiest ports in the US.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Just for ships and figgles . . . have a glance at 155 and at 55 in this series. While we’re reconnoitering the past, here’s 5.

And here’s springtime 2019.  Might this be the last view I get of tug Viking?  Scuttlebutt’s bumped into me saying so. Her first (I believe) appearance on this blog was over 11 years ago here. She had some near twins, but none evolved quite as she did.

FB has this group I really enjoy called Freighters in the Night;  I could submit this one. Jonathan C escorts an MSC box ship out.

Liz Vinik is a former fleet mate of Viking;  I caught her yesterday entering the kills with a Cashman barge carrying barges. Click here for some photos of previous iterations of this boat.

A dark, slow-to-wake morning like yesterday provides lots of points of light.  Here Joyce D. heads out, likely for her railroad work.

Enjoy these contrasts, Linda L. Miller and Hayward, two specialized boats.

Let’s end with a transient, sporadically seen in the sixth boro, a formerly Pacific Ocean Crowley tug . . .  Morgan,  out of New Bedford.

All photos e-watermarked with invisible metadata as taken by Will Van Dorp in the past month.

 

Way back when, I had some fun abridging “__ Express” names, generating Glex and Sex.   While out at the KVK, then, I thought I’d seen Dublin Express aka Dex before, so I’d take some photos, of the box ship and

the two escort tugs.

And I wondered about the unusual pyramidal arrangement of containers on the stern.

I hadn’t known that Gary Haszko, credited for the next two photos,  was taking photos almost simultaneously from Elizabethport, and aware of something else.

Here the two tugs assist in pinning Dex to the pierced in Howland Hook.  He also knew something else I was unaware of, ie, containers tumbling overboard during a rough ocean transit may have damaged the hull and led to oil spilling into the Kills.  For more on this spill, click here.

After a concerted investigation and clean up effort, USCG cleared the ship to depart. 

Many thanks to Gary for use of the last two photos above;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Stephen B heads light westbound about to pass under the Bayonne Bridge, as

Mary H, especially busy during the cold times of the year, pushes some petroleum product in the opposite direction.  Soon leaves will decorate Shooters out beyond her. There’s a pool hall in Queens by the name Shooters, so to clarify, here are some Shooters history posts from way back.

Mr Jim moves some aggregates, also eastbound out of Newark Bay.

James D. nudges Dublin Express as needed into Howland Hook.

Eric and Capt. Brian A. assist a CMA CGM box ship.

Evelyn Cutler moves some petroleum along the supply chain.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s burning high octane himself these days.

Related:  Let me reiterate Lee Rust’s question of a day or so ago:  What is the current working estimate of operating tugs in NY’s sixth boro?  For starters, I think it’s hard to count because of the dynamic, transient nature of traffic.  Just ballparking it without breaking it down by company and enumerating, I’d say 75 at least.  For consistency, let’s say we can count a tugboat as present if it shows up on AIS/VHF/traffic control at least once a month.  I’d love to hear you estimates.

Quick  . ..  name the ship name the ONE vessel  . . .

The first three photos were taken Sunday by Bjoern of the New York Media Boat.

And if you know the tugs in the sixth boro you have a 75% chance of naming all tugs here too . . .   three of the four 6000 hp tugs by Moran.  I’m not first in pointing out how small the tugs look relative to the 1200′ ONE Stork.  I hope you guessed that right.  The tugs are JRT, James D, Jonathan, and then Margaret farther back.

While we’re on names . . .  Glenn Raymo caught this photo  upriver.

Dodo . . . First ONE Stork and then Dodo.

Over by Shooters Island the other day, I caught Amstel Stork, coming from Port Newark and headed upriver herself.

Jonathan and Miriam assist her around Bergen Point, but here’s my point:  two vessels named “stork” in the harbor the same week!!?  What going on?  And with Dutch as my first language, I read this as Ooievaar van Amsted . . . that big bird name being ooievaar in Dutch.

Recently, vessels with the following names have visited the sixth boro:   NYK Blue Jay    Southern Owl   Stena Penguin  …   See what I mean about a trend that has emerged?  A few years back I saw the Eagle fleet, eg in yesterday’s post, and separate from that . . . Asphalt Eagle.  A few years back I saw a Peacock.

Here are some I suppose I’ll never see:  Subsea Seven has some bird vessels, esp  in diving support.

Millennium Falcon….  oh wait, that might not have launched yet . . .   Magic Victoria was here recently, although my photo was too blurry to use here.  Surfer Rosa . . . that name of the many I’ve posted here will stick with me.   As of this morning, Surfer Rosa is westbound in the Med just outside Algerian waters.

Many thanks to Bjoern and Glenn for use of their photos.

 

April 2009 . . . a decade ago but it’s still palpable and present.

How could I not remember the morning before work I stood on the Elizabethport dock wishing the punch-in clock mechanism would slow to a pace slower than McAllister Responder and McAllister Sisters helping Eagle Boston ooze toward her Linden berth . . .   Some who don’t take many photos might not be able to fathom how those moments stick to the memory.

Or the unmistakeable Norwegian Sea light and going for fuel near IMTT .  . at dawn;  it’s unforgettable.   I was hoping there’d no delays on the rest of my way to work that morning.

Another day, I took lunch break in Elizabethport, thrilled that Laura K and Margaret were escorting Seoul Express away from Howland Hook . . ..  backing her down.

And here’s one . . . I recall my pain this morning as I walked north along HRP, conflicted between the hurt of betrayal and the chill of being under-dressed, since I’d crept out early on a Saturday morning thinking that sun in April translated into warmth ..  . and the throaty sound of Melvin E. Lemmerhirt distracted me from all those things.

Also from that dock in Elizabethport, I watched Rosemary McAllister and Responder ease Hyundai Voyager boat toward the dock in Howland Hook . . .

The scene here is harder to recall, but from l to r, it’s Nathan E. Stewart, New River, and –the uniquely named– Gramma Lee T Moran . . .!

In April 2009, I commuted into work early a lot,so that I could catch the likes of this . . . John Reinauer moving a barge southbound on the Arthur Kill… not knowing that a few years later, that equipment would travel across to the South Atlantic.

Scott Turecamo . . .  this is the only photo in this “oldies” set that could have been taken in 2019 as easily as in 2009, except I’d have to photoshop in the current Manhattan skyline in the distance . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes he’s still fit to add to the archives in 2029 . . .

Let’s try a variation:  I’ve random tugs and random ships, in which I’ve confined most pics to a single general location and a a single photographer . . . me.  “Really random tugs” combines locations, eras, and photographers.  So why not do the same with ships, although in this case I’ve taken almost all the photos but in a variety of locations and times.

But this first one launches the concept.  What can you surmise or identify about the photo below, not taken by me?  Answer at the end of this post.

Spring brings the Great Lakes back to life. Here is a March 11 AIS capture of traffic on the Lakes.  The “arrows” are US and Canadian CG doing ice ops.  The rivers system around Chicago has some traffic.

The NOAA satellite image below provides the explanation . . .  what looks ice covered IS.  With the Soo scheduled to open on Monday, March 25, icebreaking carries high priority.   Note Green Bay as well.

March 22 marked the opening of the Welland Canal.  The first upbound ship this year was Thunder Bay;  this photo I took in Quebec in October 2017.  The first down bounder through the Welland was Algoma Spirit, but I’ve never gotten a photo of her.

Kaye E. Barker was the first springtime vessel out of Duluth;  I took this photo in the last week of navigation before the Soo closed on January 15.  The Soo is scheduled to open on Monday, March 25.

The KVK is a busy place all year round, although it’s not uniformly busy.  On this day last month, Alpine Maya followed Port Richmond, which  followed Atlantic Sun.

Stolt Integrity here stemmed while waiting to replace the tanker in the distance to leave the berth.

Tankers come in a variety of sizes;  Selasse is a particular small one.

By now, have you figured out that first photo?  I’ll give you a clue:  vessel name is Nggapulu and as of last night she was in BauBau.

Traffic moves at all hours;  night photos turn out quite unsatisfying, but golden hour ones I enjoy.  Can you guess the hull color on this one?

Foreshortening belies the amount of distance actually between the stern of the Evergreen ship and Diane B/John Blanche.

The colorful Stena tankers, bears and all,  seem to appear mostly in winter.

So here you have the answer, sort of.  Indonesia, being a far-flung archipelago supports a ferry system called Pelni, an acronym.  As an example of distances here, find Jakarta lower left.  From there to Makassar roughly in the center is 1000 miles!  Pelni operates about two dozen ferries of various designs.  Ngga Pulu has classic lines and was launched in 2002.

Here’s an English language site about traveling the archipelago.   Restless?  Aye peri!

Many thanks to Hannah Miller for sharing the photo of Ngga Pulu.  I’m not sure how that’s pronounced, but it’s named for a mountain.  Learning about Pelni and seeing this map gives me a whole new appreciation of Dewaruci.

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