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Let’s try a variation:  I’ve random tugs and random ships, in which I’ve confined most pics to a single general location and a a single photographer . . . me.  “Really random tugs” combines locations, eras, and photographers.  So why not do the same with ships, although in this case I’ve taken almost all the photos but in a variety of locations and times.

But this first one launches the concept.  What can you surmise or identify about the photo below, not taken by me?  Answer at the end of this post.

Spring brings the Great Lakes back to life. Here is a March 11 AIS capture of traffic on the Lakes.  The “arrows” are US and Canadian CG doing ice ops.  The rivers system around Chicago has some traffic.

The NOAA satellite image below provides the explanation . . .  what looks ice covered IS.  With the Soo scheduled to open on Monday, March 25, icebreaking carries high priority.   Note Green Bay as well.

March 22 marked the opening of the Welland Canal.  The first upbound ship this year was Thunder Bay;  this photo I took in Quebec in October 2017.  The first down bounder through the Welland was Algoma Spirit, but I’ve never gotten a photo of her.

Kaye E. Barker was the first springtime vessel out of Duluth;  I took this photo in the last week of navigation before the Soo closed on January 15.  The Soo is scheduled to open on Monday, March 25.

The KVK is a busy place all year round, although it’s not uniformly busy.  On this day last month, Alpine Maya followed Port Richmond, which  followed Atlantic Sun.

Stolt Integrity here stemmed while waiting to replace the tanker in the distance to leave the berth.

Tankers come in a variety of sizes;  Selasse is a particular small one.

By now, have you figured out that first photo?  I’ll give you a clue:  vessel name is Nggapulu and as of last night she was in BauBau.

Traffic moves at all hours;  night photos turn out quite unsatisfying, but golden hour ones I enjoy.  Can you guess the hull color on this one?

Foreshortening belies the amount of distance actually between the stern of the Evergreen ship and Diane B/John Blanche.

The colorful Stena tankers, bears and all,  seem to appear mostly in winter.

So here you have the answer, sort of.  Indonesia, being a far-flung archipelago supports a ferry system called Pelni, an acronym.  As an example of distances here, find Jakarta lower left.  From there to Makassar roughly in the center is 1000 miles!  Pelni operates about two dozen ferries of various designs.  Ngga Pulu has classic lines and was launched in 2002.

Here’s an English language site about traveling the archipelago.   Restless?  Aye peri!

Many thanks to Hannah Miller for sharing the photo of Ngga Pulu.  I’m not sure how that’s pronounced, but it’s named for a mountain.  Learning about Pelni and seeing this map gives me a whole new appreciation of Dewaruci.

Here goes another 3-fer, three cargo vessels making their way again through the KVK simultaneously.  JRT here at dawn assists orange juice carrier Orange Blossom 2 through the ConHook Range.

Jonathan C passes in front of them, returning from assisting another vessel now bound for sea.

Right behind the juice carrier is a box ship.

 

As the juice ship nears midpoint in the KVK, notice a RORO rounding Bergen Point at the west end of the KVK.

As I said, congestion . ..   that’s routine.  Kimberly travels along the starboard bow of the RORO,

Meanwhile, that box ship mentioned earlier has Eric on port

and Capt Brian A. at the stern.

Glovis Safety . . . headed for Philly and as of this moment is midAtlantic on its way to Zeebrugge.

 

As I said . . .   skillful mariners make a congested waterway seem just routine.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Pushing and shoving  . . . are they different in this context with 3000 hp concentrated in the right location?

New steel and recycled name . . . Torm Hilde, the 114,000 dwt tanker in port recently, got spun around in the KVK by Kimberly and JRT.

Torm Hilde is one of the largest tankers operated by the company, now in its 130th year!

And while two Moran tugs are assisting the Torm tanker out, two more are assisting crude tanker Compassion into her berth.

And then two more are assisting an Evergreen L ship through as well.

Congestion? . . . it’s just another day in the Kills….

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

It’s that day, and although I’d planned something different, there are a lot of these green containers coming through the sixth boro.  Guess which ship?  Unrelated but something else to guess?  What is the emerald isle of the Great Lakes USA?  Answer follows.

Kimberly Turecamo was on port bow the other day, as

 

James D. and

 

Kirby assist along starboard side.

I believe 30 of the L- series have been built.  Click here (and look on the left nav bar) for their green features.

Go to any world shipping lane and you’ll see them.  The photo below was in Gatun Lake.

Their profile is unmistakeable.

I certainly haven’t even taken a photo of everyone I’ve seen in the sixth boro.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s ingesting green things like basil and oregano today.

Here is the first in this series.  Here’s another.  And from 12 years ago here’s an earlier class of Evergreen C-ships.

Emerald Isle of the Great Lakes . . .  it’s in Lake Michigan . . .  Beaver Island!!

 

It might as well be spring already.  Well, maybe my wish is that spring were here.  I heard a spurious claim on a TV I visited the other day that March 20 is the planetary beginning of spring in the north but March 1 is the meteorological start of spring.  But it must be true since I heard it on TV!??

But pairs, not Paris.  Capt. Brian and Charles D. . . .  interesting pair showing evolution of design 50 over the half century between the launch of each.

Fells Point landed Doubleskin 302 with Stephen B doing assist.  That’s the first I seen Stephen B in the assist role.

Miss Julia could be Dylan Cooper‘s workboat.

CF Campbell heads east passing Scott Turecamo/New Hampshire and then

makes for the Upper Bay, where JRT is assisting Orange Blossom 2, herself a bloom in the dawn light.   The photo above and the one below I took less than a minute apart, yet you’d think the light was saying hours separated the two.

Kimberly passes Eric.

Marie J Turecamo and Mister Jim run side by side under the Bayonne Bridge.  Does anyone know when the pedestrian walkway on the bridge will open?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

All these photos were taken in this order yesterday between 0647 and 0704 EDT.  CMA CGM T. Roosevelt was bound for sea.  As of this moment, she’s off Norfolk waiting to enter the Chesapeake.  If you don’t know, Roosevelt is one of now quite a large number of ULCSs or ULCVs [I’ve read both terms for these behemoths.] calling in NYC’s sixth boro, all 1200′ loa and carrying between 13,000 and 14,500 teu.  By the way, there’s a good graphic of container vessel evolution in that link.

At 0647 she was passing Caddells.  Dawn and dusk shots have lots of lights and their reflections in them.

 

Jonathan C sees her out  . . . .

Imagine the number of tractors needed to move each of these containers out of a port.  Better still, imagine a parking lot of all those tractors parked as close together as you could. I’ll get back to that.

The bow was illuminated by dawn; the stern is quite dark. In the extreme left to the left of Jonathan C, Scott Turecamo had a waiver to move into the KVK to get to her berth with a favorable tide.

 

Note where the docking pilot will exit.

 

When I zoomed all the way out, the camera sees more of what I saw, big picture adjusted for light.  The photo above and below I took just a few seconds apart.

Although the images below relate to Great Lakes shipping, they do illustrate the point I was trying to make with the comment above about tractors needed to move all of these containers all tightly parked in single lot. I’d love to see an illustrator create this image, including the cross county double-decker container train cars.  And I know fuels differ as well.  Of course, an alternative is to make and consume all out machines, tools, toys, etc. aka what we import and export locally.

Again, this is Great Lakes, but I’m guessing this is part of the green oldie-but-goodie deal.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp.

This light is available for only a few minutes twice a day but then only if the rising or setting sun is not cloud covered.  Humidity existed the other morning too, in advance of the impending rain.  I’m not sure why, but late winter/early spring light seems richer as well, although that may be related to directionality.

Alex McAllister approached from the east end of the KVK, and her illumination and that of her background differs

from that of Amy Moran, approaching from the west end of the strait.

Pokomoke followed Alex, about a minute later, but the light has already changed.

 

Andiamo‘s port bow has caught no rays yet, unlike the west side of the dock where she’s tied up.

Meanwhile, Amy moves past and into the Upper Bay.  Lighting like this is certainly worth getting up and out for.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who linked previous installments of this title here.

For good photos, andiamo one of these pre-dawns.

 

 

like route 66, this gets me kicks . . . although I see no ” St. Louis, Joplin, Missouri, Oklahoma City looks oh-mighty pretty.  You’ll see Amarillo, a-Gallup, New Mexico, Flagstaff, Arizona, don’t forget Winona, Kingman, Barstow, San Bernardino….”

But I digress.  In the distance it’s Glorious Leader and closer up–not much–it’s Bitu Express getting a delivery from Twin Tube.  What is the purpose of that large rectangular structure over the stern of Bitu Express?  My guess would be a heating system of some sort . . .

One a dark, rainy, too-late morning of March 10, it’s good to go back a day and see ONE Minato in morning sunlight, in

homeport registered in Kobe,

Where would Lian Gui Hu be registered do you suppose?

 

Monaco Bridge . . .  yes there are bridges in Monaco, but this ULCV is registered in Panama.

 

You’d maybe expect Maersk Callao to be Peru-flagged, but  . . . hey, maybe Singapore has a Calle Callao or Avenida Callao.   That’s Potomac with a barge lightening alongside.

And Evergreen Ever Loading . . .  London?

Torm Hilde . . .  you’d think Copenhagen or even Aalborg…

Stolt Integrity  . . .  Georgetown!??  Practically every state in the US has a town by that name, and Indiana–in fact–has FOUR!!  An’ dis aint nun a dems!

All the color in this post remind me of a CV I’ve not seen in a while . . . Buffalo Hunter.

All photos and humor–attempted–by Will Van Dorp, who thinks there should be a route 66-parallel song for shipping in the sixth boro.   Enya has one that starts to get at it . . .

Happy short day . . .

 

To continue on from yesterday’s list . . . I’ve done chugster, jetster, even a gangster . . . though you have to search for it here by scrolling a bit,  but the blog is called tugster, and I’m proud of that some chuckles notwithstanding . . . .

This is a cross section for the 250th time, a random sampling of what tugboats were working in the Upper Bay of NYC aka the sixth boro on a given morning earlier this week.   By the way, the 001 version of this title dates from October 2007.

Vane Brothers boats and barges abound.

Hunting Creek stands by a set of four of them, while

Wye River travels light past the ferry racks.

Franklin Reinauer travels light past the count-defying load of containers on a ULCV over in Global.

ATB Freeport and Chemical Transporter transfer cargo over at the east end of IMTT, at

the same time

Scott Turecamo and New Hampshire do.

CF Campbell stands by with Long Island.

 

And passing an unusual but new landmark along the sixth born margins,

Patrice McAllister makes her way west.  Quick . . . name a larger global garment retailer than H & M, and what the initials H & M expand to?  Answers here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose fingers froze and cold tears flowed while having the float-about, look-about.

 

Here was the first post of this title.

Yesterday was cold but also windy, and this allowed me to see Sarah D in a role I’ve not posted previously for this boat, although she’s no doubt specialized in the assist role earlier in her career.

Above she approaches the dock on the port side.   The flag direction shows she’s in the lee.  At the hose rack, she drops back and

moves to the starboard side, as Mary Turecamo moves Tennessee into the dock.

 

 

She holds the barge here against the wind and current until all lines are made fast.

This stretch of the KVK was quite busy, so more on the other traffic tomorrow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who loves this cold clear weather, even though he puts lots of chemical heat packs in his pockets and boots on days like this.

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