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Click here for the first installment of this story . . .

Tuesday 0630.  Note here that crews have already begun lowering the booms of these new gantry cranes in order to fit under the VZ Bridge.

Wednesday 0915.  Plans were to begin the transit, but an anchor windlass refused to cooperate.

Wednesday 1030.  And the fog began to descend.

Thursday 0630.  It was a glorious morning.

Thursday 1000.  It’s a go.  That’s Media Boat 4 in the foreground.

1026.  I read there’s a 10′ clearance, but my perspective–faulty–said otherwise.

1027.  Yup . . . plenty clearance.

1140. near the Bayonne Bridge

1141.  James D. Moran in the hard hat area.

1146.

1147.  Under the bridge and then a turn into Port Elizabeth.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Read a Staten Island Advance article here.

 

Ivory Coast

Christian Reinauer

Ross Sea

C. Angelo

Scott Turecamo, New Hampshire, and Brendan Turecamo

Curtis and RTC 82

Mary Alice and Nan Lin Wan

Pearl Coast and Cement Transporter 1801

MSC Maureen, Jonathan C. Moran, and Kirby Moran

All photos taken in April 2018 by Will Van Dorp.

 

This morning I was looking for something, I thought happened in spring 2008.  Alas, I had the date wrong, but this research led me to these photos, some of which I may have posted before, all taken between April 10 and 17 2008, i.e., a decade ago exactly.  Back then I’d go into work an hour or so early, and because I had not yet plugged into AIS on my phone–I had a flipper–it was catch as catch could. Revisiting these photos stunned me with how much specific equipment has changed.

Baltic Sea and Coral Sea have gone over to West Africa.  Maybe a gallivant there is in order.  I last left West Africa forty years ago!!.

Maryland is still in the area;  I caught a glimpse of her in Jamaica Bay last week as Liz Vinik, but not close enough for a photo showing anything but a speck.  Check out Birk’s site’s info on Vinik Marine Services.

Nathan E. Stewart came to an ignoble end.

Both K-Sea and Allied have been purchased by Kirby.  Petrel has gone to Philadelphia, where she’s working as Northstar Integrity. Below, she was pushing Sugar Express, up to the plant in Yonkers.

Crude oil tanker Wilana (now Kamari) arriving at dawn on a very calm slack water Arthur Kill was the high point of that week, especially because it was the first tanker I’d watched coming into Linden.  I’ll not forget how silent the process was.

On the starboard bow was Catherine Turecamo, now working in freshwater near the Great Lakes as John Marshall.

On her stern was Laura K Moran, now moved to another Moran base.  And, notice the Bayonne Bridge now longer has the geometry as shown below.

Any time I feel that stuff never changes, guess I should look through my archives.

All photos taken in mid-April 2008 by Will Van Dorp, who wonders if anyone out there read Future Shock by Alvin Toffler.  It was published almost a half century ago but I think he was on to something.

 

Here’s a Hudson down bound set of three posts I did five years ago, in a different season.

This trip starts at Scarano’s just south of Albany, where a crew picked up excursion boat Kingston for delivery to Manhattan.   Last fall after delivery up bound, I posted these landmarks.

Spirit of Albany (1966), operated by the Albany Port District Commission, is a regular for the Waterford Tugboat Roundup parade.

High above Castleton, name going back to Henry Hudson, is that Sacred Heart Church?

Two bridges cross just north of Coeymans are the Berkshire Spur of the NY Thruway and the Alfred H. Smith Memorial Bridge, the furthest south operational rail bridge over the Hudson.

Katherine Walker performs spring buoy planting south of Coxsackie.

I’ve heard a story behind the “parked” marine equipment in Athens NY, but need a refresher.  Anyone explain how this came to be frozen in time here?  The view is only possible if your draft allows you to navigate the channel on the west side of Middle Ground Flats.

Hudson-Athens Light is one of the lighthouses saved from demolition at a point when all lights were being automated.  Back when I did more hiking, I looked down on the Hudson and some of these landmarks from the heights, in “what Rip saw,” as in the long sleeper.

South of Catskill Creek, you can see snow still covering the slopes of the Catskills.

Marion Moran pushes Bridgeport upbound.  That’s the east shore of the Hudson beyond her.

By the time we get to Saugerties, snow seems to be creating whiteout conditions on the Catskill escarpement.

We head south, here meeting Fells Point pushing Doubleskin 302.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  For more on the lighthouses, click here. In the next in the series, we head farther south.

And for what it’s worth, I’m still in the market for some “seats” photos.

 

Here are previous installments.  And here are names and numbers of all who have all paraded in front of my lens recently.

Amy Moran, 1973, 3000hp

Joan Turecamo, 1980, 4300.

James D. Moran, 2015, 6000.

Jonathan C. Moran, 2016, 6000.

Marie J Turecamo 1968 and 2250, and James Turecamo 1969 2000 or 1800 or 1700

Marion Moran 1982 and 3000 4610

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

She was waiting on the Pacific side of the Panama Canal just a few weeks ago, so when I figured she was departing the sixth boro, I went out to catch her, esp. since her fleet mate, the 1200′ CMA CGM G. Washington recently arrived and departed in the wee hours before light.

Tugs (l to r) assisting her in the turn outbound are James D. Moran, Miriam Moran, and Kirby Moran.  

 

 

 

She draws about 35′ here.  I wonder how much of that is ballast.

Enjoy a mash-up photo here to close out the post:  I was fortunate to catch CMA CGM Dalila and APL Denver both under the VZ Bridge at the same time.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp,  still looking for photos of helm seats, captain’s chairs.  I’d like to do a post on them.  I’m looking for the full range:   luxurious to decrepit or basic or high-tech.  Email me a photo of the chair and identify the vessel. You don’t need to be sitting in it.  I’ve got a good number of photos so far, but I’d like to see greater variety.  Thanks to all of you who’ve already shared photos.

 

Jonathan C Moran has appeared here plenty of times afloat, and once in dry dock as seen from her stern.

The size and depth of her hull can be better appreciated, I believe, when seeing her from the bow, with workers showing scale.

Then I was especially fortunate to have her siblings–maybe James D. here–pass by in the KVK, several hundred feet beyond the dry dock.

Then seconds later, another sibling–Kirby–passes as she

keeps pressure on the stern of MSC Chicago.

This is my first view of the amount and configuration of submarine fendering on this tug.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

The challenge here is to have clear photos and lights.  Evening Star with B. No. 250 starts us off,

Jean Turecamo is on assignment with a barge,

Reinauer Twins heads back for the Kills,

TRF Memphis waits in Stapleton anchorage,

Mount St. Elias departs her barge,

and Alice Austen, usually the wee hours ferry, runs early.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s a good view of the props on a z-drive boat.  The 8.5′ props are part of the Schottel SRP 1515 FP drive system.  Note the port-a-potty between the stacks, a dry-dock worker convenience?

The scale of the cranes at Howland Hook belies the fact that Jay Michael and Bosco, passing Shooters Island, are still at least a mile closer to the lens than HH port.

In different light, here’s a Bosco closeup.

James E. Brown before dawn;  the structure like a lighthouse beyond JEB‘s stern is the control tower at Newark Airport, which celebrates its 90th anniversary this coming October.

The Statue salutes Little C.  I’ve often tried for a photo that suggests the Statue’s eyes are fixed on something in the foreground, and I’d say here Little C has helped me make that happen.

Barge John Blanche is returned homeward through Hell Gate by Diane B.

OK . . .  Is it Joan or Doris?

I’ll stop here.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Definitely some sort of military truck, probably FMTV made by Oshkosh.  Some of the numbering is Hebrew.

And there’s a bunch of them, up there

squeezing under

the Bayonne Bridge, as they and the rest of the cargo

aboard the Norddeusche ship

rounds Bergen Point on the way to Port.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has seen military trucks and other vehicles atop the boxes previously here, here, here, and here.   Once I even spotted a cigarette boat way up there.

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