You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Moran’ category.

I re-learned an acronym  . . . LCTC, or large car and truck carrier.  These included the Wallenius Wilhelmsen orange ROROs with names beginning with T, like Topeka, Tortugas . . .  and so on.  The green ones are HERO type, smaller and more efficient.

She’s 755′ x 106′ and by tomorrow she could be squeezing through the original Panama Canal locks.

 

I wonder if these bow ports see water in rough seas.

 

 

All photos, WVD.

Here’s another LCTC, Torino.

And as to continuing impact of Covid-19 on jobs, here‘s info on an announcement from a few days ago of temporary layoffs of WW employees.  I’m wondering if that includes those ILA folks in port who drive the cars and trucks off these ships.

Last post I titled this way was almost 10 years ago here.

These photos from a few days ago show no sense of the unprecedentedly different harbor.

Since Margaret assisted fleet mate Lois Ann L with barge Philadelphia off crude tanker Ionic Artemis, they’ve separated, each headed out in different directions.

x

 

All photos, WVD, who wishes everyone health.

 

Ooops!  It’s later than I thought.

When Cape Moss arrived in the sixth boro the other day, she was 16 days and 10 hours out of Cape Town.

Kirby Moran assisted as she entered the Kills.

Compared with the largest container vessels that come into port here these days, this 2011 ship is modest.

It makes me wonder what goods travel via container between South Africa and the US.  She left the next day for Baltimore, and has now departed there as well.  Think the trade in goods and services between South Africa and the US is greater than $10 billion?  Find your answer here.

All photos, WVD, who wishes everyone health.

I won’t ask which tug that is, featureless though it is, given the title.  I’m actually astonished that after some 4450 posts I’ve not yet dedicated a post to this tugboat.

That’s Brendan Turecamo on starboard bow and Miriam Moran on port.  Brendan is four years older than Miriam, which was christened in November 1979 and has worked in the sixth boro ever since.

 

She’s named for the  . . . Miriam Moran, wife of the Moran President from 1964 until 1987, if I read the archives correctly.

 

She has appeared on this blog hundreds of times;  one of the earliest was in Random Tugs 001,  back in 2007 when I still located relevant text below photos, unlike above them, as I do now, since one reads from the top . . .

Hat tip to this hard working tug, and her sister Margaret, two of the five tugs of the Dorothy Moran class. Spot differences?

I see at least one, but no doubt there are more both inside and out but visible only to the connoisseur.

All photos, WVD.

Tightrope?

 

This ULCV shows 17 containers across.

It’s a bit surprising to see a Moran 6000 on starboard bow, also on a “tight rope.”

YM Evolution . . . without counting the rows of containers, does it look less beamy?

It is  . . . 15 across.  By contrast, CMA CGM Amerigo Vespucci, the other day here, carries 20 across.

All photos, WVD.

 

This series goes way back to 2007, when I erroneously thought a song existed called “Paris in springtime.”  My deciding it must be a faux memory did not prevent me from doing a bunch more posts, with variations like “pairs in winter,” like today’s posts.  It still is winter.  And there is a movie with a somewhat similar name;  a fun trailer can be seen here.

Let’s start with Sarah Ann and Thomas E. pairing up to get a crane off to Sims.

 

Ellen and Ava team up to see a small container vessel into the kills.

 

Meagan Ann and Emily Ann each bring a scow for the filling, likely with scrap?

 

And for a variation, a mixed triad of Margaret, Alex, and Ava return from assists.

All photos, WVD, who wishes you happy springish late winter and successful social separations.

 

 

As coronavirus spasms across the globe, affecting all aspects of public activity, container ship runs has been blanked.  But you would not guess so from the string of CMA CGM vessels that came in one sunny day last week.  La Traviata rounded the bend just before 1100.

The teu capacity of this 2006-built ship is said to be 8488 containers.

She was so light that the prop wash splashed froth to the surface.

Ten minutes later CMA CGM Thames appeared.

Thames carries 9200 containers, and was built in 2015.  I’ve never seen either Thames or La Traviata in the sixth boro, which does not mean they’ve not called here before.

 

A few hours later, a third CMA CGM vessel arrived . . . Amerigo Vespucci, one I had previously seen.

The 2010 Vespucci has capacity of 13,344 containers.  She one of the 1200′ vessels that now regularly call here.

That totals to 31,032 teu container capacity represented by a single fleet transiting inbound in less than a quarter of a day!  And to do some math here, that’s about 117 miles of containers stacked end to end, ie., the distance from the Staten Island St. George Terminal to the Delaware Memorial Bridge.

For some perspective, a Korean company will begin operating the largest teu vessels to date . . . 24,000 teu.

So like I said, last week I did not sense that container ship sailings were slowing, which does not mean they are not.

All photos, WVD.

Unrelated:  A new word for a wasteful and polluting practice is coming from pandemic  . . . they’re called ghost flights . . .  Here‘s more on why airlines choose to fly these almost empty planes.

Port Shanghai just happens these days to be in a berth on Staten Island

discharging salt from Chile.

I know what this says, but I can’t claim to read it until I study Greek.

Thor Integrity I CAN read, but

until I know Thai, I can’t vouch for “Thor Integrity” being a translation.

Chinese is a common language in the sixth boro,

 

and it’s interesting which writing systems do not appear here . . .  too many to name.

All photos, WVD.

The light has been right the past few times I’ve seen Chele-C.

After seeing these winter draggers in the sixth boro for over a decade, they still amaze me; that it happens is surprising.  Here Chele-C works the water alongside Barney Turecamo and barge Georgia.

 

She’s down by Cass Gilbert’s Brooklyn Army Terminal and alongside RTC 107.

 

 

The many backgrounds like Erie Basin and the Red Hook Grain Terminal behind her . . . all make her a sight to be seen.

All photos, WVD.

 

I’d been watching No.11Asomaru for a few days, wondering what the story was.  It appeared to coexist with containership MOL Courage, the green symbol surrounding the smaller gray one.  It did this screen grab Friday morning . . . yesterday.  When I saw there was a Asomaru No.8  and it was a tugboat, I thought possibly there’d be a tugboat riding on the containers, and I made excuses to avoid work and zoomed out to the Narrows.

There I saw MOL Courage anchored, an unusual spot for a container ship.

Several Moran tugs were standing by with it.

When the MOL vessel headed in, I leaped into motion and followed it, hoping to catch a glance of the Japanese tug.

 

But I saw nothing, except containers.

Later in the day, I checked on MOL Courage in Port Elizabeth, and sure enough, the

gray icon for No.11Asomaru is still there.

Can anyone explain this signal?  I saw a similar signal once before last fall . . . supposedly an unspecified vessel on a container ship, also in Port Elizabeth.

I’m puzzled.

Dd you catch my reference to leaping into motion . . .   Sorry . . . I couldn’t pass up that opportunity, given today’s date.  Previous leap days’ posts are here and here and here.

All photos, captures, leaping imagination here, WVD.

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,339 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

March 2020
M T W T F S S
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031