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It’s a dark and soon to be rainy day in the sixth boro, so for your enjoyment . . . colorful photos from yesterday.

This ship uses the old spelling . . .  like Peking v. Beijing.  Know the current spelling?

 

Crystal Cutler came by with Patricia E. Poling, to add some greens to the palette.

 

The Hapag Lloyd box ship was assisted in by James D. Moran and

Mary Turecamo.

So . . . today’s maps would spell this as Qingdao, home to China’s second largest brewery . . . which uses the old spelling too.

All photos, Will Van Dorp.

Here are previous installments, the last of which I did in 2011.

The idea here is just photos.  For identification, there’s text on the images and in the tags.

Morning light enhances the mostly thorough coating of steel with bright paint colors.

 

 

 

 

Next stop Belford for Midnight.  Too bad I don’t live closer to the Seafood Co-op there.

All photos by Will Van Dorp . . .

Today it’s all light, technically.  Other than that, this set is all sizes, all ages, all powers, and all shapes.

Let’s start with  Gabby L., built in 2007 (?), 25.9′ x 13.7′, and rated as 660 hp.

Comparing that, check out Genesis Vigilant, which I first met as Michigan Service, (same order of numbers) 1981, 89′ x 28′, and 3000 hp.

Emily Ann, ex-Solomon Sea, ex-Brandon Roehrig and ex-Diane Roehrig, 1964, 89′ x 28′, and also 3000 hp.

Sea Fox, 2012, 69′ x 24′, and 1400 hp.

Joyce D. Brown, 2002, 78′ x 26′, and 2600 hp.

Fleetmate Thomas J. Brown, 1962, 61′ x 19′, and 1000 hp.

As I said before, technically light but about to engage the Seaspan ship, Jonathan C, 2016, 89′ x 38′, and 6000 hp.

And since we started out with Gabby L, let’s end there also, but you may have to look carefully to the left of the VZ bridge towers . . . . to spot her.  As I said before . . . all shapes and sizes, but they all work a niche in the sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Sometimes the sixth boro gets crowded, as you can see from these posts.  This post tries to show that, but keep in mind that foreshortening makes these vessels seem closer than they are–the two ships below are more than a mile apart.  Keep in mind also that a water channel is a dynamic medium, current and wind are in play, and . . . there are no brakes.

 

About a hundred yards are between the docked “orange/green hull” and Cronus Leader.

Also, the KVK has numerous curves;  it seems here that the pale yellow will pass starboard to starboard with Cronus Leader,

 

but because of the winding channel, a few minutes later they’re clearly headed port to port.

The dark hull along the extreme left of the photo–and several shots above– is tied to a dock.  It’s the NYC DEP sludge tanker Hunts Point, now in service for over five years, as profiled in this article.  It’s time I do another post on the sludge tankers.

 

Orange Sun has safely passed Cronus Leader, leaves plenty of space passing Hunts Point,  

and lets Denak Voyager, heading to Port Newark to load scrap metals, ease through the opening along its portside.

 

A total of fifteen minutes has elapsed between the first photo in this post and the one above.  Scale here can be understood by looking at the crewman on watch–all wearing orange– on the nearer orange juice tanker and the farther bulk carrier.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who thinks that at least two things are remarkable here, both the efficiency of effort on the part of the vessel crews and the variety of cargo represented.

I took this photo after dawn, technically, and what detail of tug James D Moran is lost because of low light is somewhat compensated for by the lights of the boats and on the Brooklyn background.

Ditto . . . a few minutes later, the lights are dramatic as James D passes the illuminated IMTT facility.

Evelyn Cutler passed a bit later;  light was still low from an overcast sky.

JRT Moran heads back to base, the sky is still overcast, wind brisk, and standing around taking photos was cold.

Paula Atwell is quite common here, but usually the boat is obscured by the containerized garbage she pushes.

Navigator passed with her barge . . .  and the sun I’d wished for was still not forthcoming.

Barry Silverton . . . pushing a deeply-loaded Fight ALS toward the Sound.  Here’s a document I’d never seen in its entirety explaining the Harley “naming” project.  It turns out that Mr. Silverton was a victim of ALS.  What I thought was a one-off vessel naming is actually a fleet-wide enterprise.  For example, Dr. Milton Waner is named for a pioneer in the treating of hemangiomas.

Franklin Reinauer, passing Nave Ariadne, has operated with that name–I believe–since she first came off the ways.

Marjorie B McAllister waits alongside New Ability to assist an incoming container vessel.

which Capt Brian A. McAllister is already assisting.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who at this point had the luxury of having some indoor work to attend to while warming up.

I knew it was coming.  VHF chatter alluded to it.  AIS showed it.  And for going on 10 minutes I’d heard it . . . sound, at intervals of not more than two minutes, a prolonged blast, of which I’d heard no fewer than five . . .

Then in addition to the chest-penetrating blasts, I became aware of a low rpm throbbing. When the bow first appeared, it came with no hint of what followed.

A gray ship on a mild but foggy winter’s day . . . its size seems exaggerated.  It was so foggy that Bergen Point was closed to all traffic over a certain tonnage, although waivers could be requested and granted.

 

The white bridge remained invisible.

 

It seemed the vessel tiptoed out,

restrained by the Moran tug.

And after she had passed, the stern remained visible as the bow blended into the fog.  The fog horn, now oriented away, seemed to have moved much farther than the ship had.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Happy 2020, so let’s go a decade back, and see a selection of photos from January 2010.

Ross Sea escorts Rebel eastbound past Atlantic Leo in the KVK.

Lucy Reinauer, bathed in morning light, approaches Howland Hook in the AK.

Miss Gill and Lucky D head for the smaller Bayonne Bridge and Goethals Bridge, off to the west.

Athena is way out of Block Island Sound, here doing winter work in the sixth boro.  Little did I know back then that I’d soon be taking my first ride to Block Island aboard Athena.

North Sea is on the hard in Kingston NY.

My favorite winter harbor fishing vessel passes Robbins Reef, leaving

the rest of the fleet farther to the NE in the Upper Bay.  Note how different the skyline of lower Manhattan was then.

Doris escorts a tanker into the KVK.

Davis Sea crushes her way into the Rondout with a load of heat.

It was, as all these “retro sixth boro posts,” only a decade ago, but so much has changed.

All photos in January 2010 by Will Van Dorp.  Happy 2020.

 

For your quick peruse today, I offer the inverse of yesterday’s post:  I went to my archives and selected the LAST photo of something water-related each month of 2019. So if that photo was a person or an inland structure, I didn’t use it;  instead, I went backwards … until I got to the first boat or water photo.

For January, it was Weeks 226 at the artificial island park at Pier 55, the construction rising out of the Hudson, aka Diller Island.

February saw Potomac lightering Maersk Callao.

March brought Capt. Brian and Alex McAllister escorting in an ULCV.

April, and new leaves on the trees, it was CLBoy heading inbound at the Narrows.  Right now it’s anchored in an exotic port in Honduras and operating, I believe, as Lake Pearl.

A month later, it happened to be Dace Reinauer inbound at the Narrows, as seen from Bay Ridge.

June it was MV Rip Van Winkle.  When I took this, I had no inkling that later this 1980 tour boat based in Kingston NY would be replaced by MV Rip Van Winkle II.  I’ve no idea where the 1980 vessel, originally intended to be an offshore supply vessel,  is today.

July  . . . Carolina Coast was inbound with a sugar barge for the refinery in Yonkers.

Late August late afternoon Cuyahoga,I believe, paralleled us in the southern portion of Lake Huron.

Last photo for September, passing the Jersey City cliffs was FireFighter II.

October, last day, just before rain defeated me, I caught the indomitable Ellen McAllister off to the next job.

November, on a windy day, it was Alerce N, inbound from Cuba. Currently she’s off the west side of Peru.

And finally, a shot from just a few days ago . . .  in the shadow under the Bayonne Bridge, the venerable Miriam Moran, who also made last year’s December 31 post.  Choosing her here was entirely coincidental on my part.

And that’s it for 2019 and for the second decade of the 21st century.  Happy 2020 and decade three everyone.  Be safe and satisfied, and be in touch.  Oh, and have an adventure now and then, do random good things, and smile unexpectedly many times per day.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will spend most of tomorrow, day 1 2020, driving towards the coast.  Thanks for reading this.  Maybe we’ll still be in touch in 2030.

 

Believe it or not, I’m way inland and without a camera, and a preference for novelty prompts  a different almost-year-end post together.  Rules I made for myself follow:  go to my archives and select the first photo of something water-related each month of 2019. So if the first photo in my archives for each month is a person or an inland structure, I don’t use it;  instead, I go forward in that month to the first boat or water photo.

For January, it was Susquehanna in a very familiar IMTT on the Bayonne side of the KVK.  She’s currently westbound along the Keys.

February was La Perla, an oyster barge on Peconic Bay.

March was Nathan G on the very southern tip of Manhattan, across from the Colgate clock.  She’s currently working in the sixth boro.

Jonathan C was assisting a box ship out in the wee hours near the start of April.  Right now, she’s in the sixth boro, doing or waiting to do a similar escort.

May began with a NYC oyster boat headed north through the Narrows.

Early June it was Tavropos, in the Stapleton anchorage.  The crude oil tanker is currently off the Tabasco coast of Mexico.  The tanker appeared here previously as Moonlight Venture.

July began with Fishing Creek headed out of the Narrows.  She’s currently near Philly.

In August it was Grande Mariner approaching lock E14.  She’s docked in Narragansett Bay.

In September, actually on September 1, it was Kaye E. Barker southbound across Lake St. Clair with the landmark Renaissance Center ahead.  She’s currently upbound on Lake Huron, possibly getting another load of ore for the season.

October began with me meeting Mrs. Chips bound for the Narrows and point south and ultimately Florida, where she currently is.

November it was Denak Voyager taking on scrap.  That’s the Newark Bay Bridge beyond the ship, and Rebecca Ann lost to the left margin.  Rebecca Ann is currently in the sixth boro, and Denak Voyager has exited the Straits of Gibraltar, heading back to the sixth boro.

And finally, December, it’s a mystery boat for now and an unidentified location. Guess if you like . . . I hope to get back to this photo in 2020.

Maybe tomorrow . . .  last day of the year . . . I’ll do the last photo of each month following the same rules.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Maybe a reader of Chinese can translate this….

or place name, contemporary or historical?

If I read this right, this 2013 vessel has had eight names in seven years, some very similar!!

She’s left Norfolk by now.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose previous names posts can seen here.

Cosco is a huge, fairly new response to twists and turns of the world shipping fortunes.

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