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Here are dozens of previous posts in this series.

I put this one up today specifically in response to a comment by a dear friend Rembert, who commented here about the apparent high center of gravity on American tugboats.  Mein Schiff 6, which is 969′ x 139′, appears to be quite “tall” but largely because of its verticality.

TUI operates Mein Schiff 7.  I’m guessing the “Leinen los”  here translates to the Dutch lekko [itself an approximation of the English],  the English “cast off.”

Here, from a different angle, is TUI’s logo projected overtop USNS Gilliland.

Steel–a great name–has similar vertical sides,

as does Orange Star, a transporter of my favorite beverage.

Ditto Denak Voyager.

For tugster, here’s an unusual shot of Avra, at the dock at night.

Let’s conclude with Navigator of the Seas, 1021′ x 127,’ so appearances aside, N o t S is actually less beamy than Mein Schiff 6.  Note the Chrysler Building in the photo below?

All photos by Will Van Dorp,who’s been unable to find air draft, particularly on Mein Schiff 6 and  Navigator of the Seas.  Anyone help?

And if you fans of the NYTimes missed Annie Correal’s story about shipping vehicles to Haiti out of Red Hook aboard Beauforce (replacement for Grey Shark?), click here to read it.

 

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I’m not shifting the focus of this blog to photography–although it’s always been photo driven–but it’s fun to shoot what the light allows, which in this case somewhat obscures the identification of the tug in the foreground and highlights in profile the construction over by the Goethals Bridge.  Also, I’ve not forgotten a realization of a few weeks back about there being nothing random;  context here is recent sixth boro.

Anyhow, name that tug?

Meanwhile, north of the GW, it’s Joan Moran (1975) with a coal barge, from what I could tell.

Farther downriver, it’s Atlantic Coast (2007) with a dredge scow.

On that same dredge project, Shannon Dann (1971) stands by with GL 602.

Wye River (2008) waits over by the Palisades,

Sea Wolf (1982) holds steady over by –is that?–Edgewater.

Barry Silverton counts down for an appointment with Fight ALS,

Brendan Turecamo (1975) hangs with Connecticut, and

that brings us back to the first photo, now benefitting from a different light and easily identifiable as

Doris Moran (1982).

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

What gives the location away . . . if you’ve never seen Albany, is the prolate spheroid along the right side of the photo.   Prolate spheroid?  Think football.  But actually that one is called the egg.  It’s a performing arts center, and I’ve never been inside. Albany is the new home of Marie J. Turecamo.

You’ll often see a Reinauer unit parked here, this time it was Haggerty Girls with RTC 107.

Two of these Liebherr Mobile Harbor Cranes serve to transfer heavy cargoes.

 

Although Albany is over 120 miles from the Atlantic, ocean-going vessels call here regularly.

Road salt was the

cargo delivered by Siirt.

Mary Kay stands by;  she previously appeared here as Mary Loy Turecamo.

Closing out this look at the port of Albany, a common barge cargo out of Albany is scrap metal.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will post again after finding reliable wifi.

Here’s what’s on the surface and

here’s a bigger picture.  That trio in the sky following Bruce A McAllister tails us as well!

Big Jake once

trafficked the sixth boro as Juliet Reinauer.

Over at the Brooklyn passenger terminal, Jonathan C waits,

canvas on the fenders, to assist Crown Princess out.

And given my scarceness in the sixth boro, the only image I have to date of the new Capt. Brian A. McAllister has the tug concealed by Alex and Eric.

And then out on the Sound, it’s John P Wronowski and escort,

headed for the barn.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who recently stumbled onto an interesting blog, now added to my blogroll under a seamsters.org  Damn autocorrect . . . I really typed aa seasisters.org          the “aa” being there to keep this near the top of my links.

 

I’ve left on another gallivant before “processing” photos from the trip in from Chicago, these being from a portion of the Hudson in various times of day, qualities of light, and types of weather.

Down bound in the port of Albany, we pass Daniel P Beyel, Marie J Turecamo, and –I believe– Comet.

By now, Daniel P is part of the way to Florida.  And I’m intrigued by the units on the dock beyond her stern . . .

…nacelle covers–and I assume the innards–for what looks like 20 wind turbines.  This led me to find out how many wind turbines are currently functional in upstate NY.  I come up with a total of at least 770 as of a year ago: 528 installed since 2006  in the northernmost band from the Adirondacks to the Saint Lawrence Valley, 165 since 2007 in western NY, and 77 since 2000 in central and Southern Tier NY.  Read specifics here.

Treasure Coast loads cement in Albany County, where Lafarge has just dedicated an upgraded facility. 

Pike awaits the next job at Port of Coeymans.

B. No. 225 gets moved northward

by Jane A. Bouchard.

And Tarpon–has to be the only one in the Hudson–moves a fuel barge as well.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Lest you think Combi-Dock III and Peking–I will get back to them– are the only thing happening in the watery parts of NYC, here’s just a sampling . . . in a series I started last summer.

SBI Macarena –a fairly new bulk carrier– came in past the Brooklynside ramps for the VZ Bridge,

passing Jo Provel on the way out . . .

looking quite large relative to the new NYC ferry.

Tanker New Confidence tested its systems–water and sonic–as Doris Moran arrived.

Where the Wind Blows sails south toward the Narrows, so fast that

I lost track of her, although I admit to being distracted by this squadron passing overhead Elizabeth Anne.

Pioneer–one of South Street Seaport Museum’s schooners–also sailed past and ever went outside

the Narrows, where I’ll pick this up another day.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, waiting for Combi-Dock III action.

 

OK . . . I prematurely published it, so here it is.

Recognize this tanker . . . once a regular in the Hudson River but out in other waters the past few years . ..

I was thinking this post could be called

Afrodite . . . shares the waterways. A sport fish boat, a USCG patrol boat, and migrating(?) swans . . .

escorted past the Bayonne Bridge, where

Margaret Moran escorts her in as other traffic passes …

and Brendan Turecamo helps out . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Not surprisingly, a lot of people were out on the boro the other morning:  speeding out to fish,

descending from Vukovar–a name slipped out of the news–into the crew boat Emily Miller,

sitting watch past BW Shinano,

ditto . . . aboard CMA CGM Tancredi,

and preparing the heaving line . . . .

 

Is that c-ship so long that the curvature of the earth can be seen along its waterline?  Actually that’s Brendan Turecamo moving SSS barge New Jersey over to Red Hook, I believe.

And a little earlier, although I place it last here, Shawn Miller pushed a trickster barge past ConHook Range.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Patricia was built in 1963 and works in the sixth boro here and here, and last I knew worked for C.H. Phoenix LLC of Green Cove Springs, Fl. . . .   I like the racing stripes.

Caitlin Ann was built in 1961 and has worked for DonJon since 2011.   Here, she and

Sarah Ann appear to be moving coal.  Sarah Ann is from 2003, working for DonJon since 2009.

Marion Moran has worked by that name since 1982.  I think that’s Katherine Weeks on the far side of the barge.

Bruce A. McAllister, 

Eric McAllister, and

Alex McAllister were all working from the Narrows the

other morning.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

aka Names 34

What??

Xena, Lady Tara, one of exactly three barges squired in by Foxy3,

Denise A. Bouchard, 

Silver Cindy,

Elbabe . . . El Babe? . .. with Bruce A. minding to port,

Turecamo Girls, and I’ll bet more than just one British Sailor or sailor of any of the seafaring nationalities . . .

along with a high voltage shore connection . . .?!@#!    That can mean only one thing…  there might be a Debbie around soon too . . .

See tomorrow’s post, for which the photos have not even been taken yet, but it’s June fishing time.  All photos taken in the past week by Will Van Dorp.  Here’s a previous Xena reference on tugster.

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