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I missed this one, but I saw it on AIS.  She used to be called Eagle Hope, but I’m thinking someone’s running out of names.

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I caught up with Alice though, here to discharge what she always does . . . aggregates.

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Denak Voyager waited in the anchorage at sunrise and before midmorning coffee, she moved to load what she always does . . . scrap.   Can

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this be the reference?

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Hafnia Lupus . .  being provisioned by the venerable Twin Tube and bunkered by a Vane unit.

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CMA CGM Musset gets escorted by Jonathan C Moran.  I had to look up Musset, but I’d figured it was an artist.

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See that outboard skiff over off the starboard bow?

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Latgale anchored off Stapleton a while back, and

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there goes Chandra B, the can-do, think-big tanker passing by Energy Champion and on its way to bunker the mothership at Sandy Hook pilots.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s off on a reconnoitre.

On the cusp of wintriness if not winter per se, the Hudson Valley is spectacular.  Let’s start with Fred Johannsen pushing this crane barge northward.  That’s the Kingston-Rhinecliff Bridge aka George Clinton Memorial Bridge (DeWitt Clinton’s uncle)  in the distance.

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Here Treasure Coast urges Cement Transporter 7700–one I’ve never seen before–the last mile to the cement dock.

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This reflection was so magical, I needed to include this closer-up.

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Emerald Coast pushes a fuel barge downstream.

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Sarah D moves a motley pair of scows upstream.

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Eastern Dawn moves a fuel barge downstream.

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Mr Russell shifts a barge near the TZ Bridge.  What is in those tanks?

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Might that be Marion Moran pushing sugar barge Somerset up toward Yonkers?

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I believe this is Doris Moran moving cement barge Adelaide downriver.

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And as a last-but-not-least photo today, here’s Cornell conducting a TOAR sign off session.  Here’s a post I did three years ago with the same activity but using a different barge.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has a proposal below:

If you are working Thursday and therefore having lunch and/or dinner at work–whether on a vessel or in some other work setting–and you choose to take a photo of the dinner–any aspect of the meal–and send it to me, please do and I’ll try to devise a post with it on Friday this week.  Thanks for the consideration.

Also, you may be “choosing” ed out by now, but here’s a set of thoughtful, well-reasoned and -articulated perspectives on the Hudson anchorages question that is open to public discussion until early December.

Also, if you’re planning to be at the WorkBoat show in New Orleans next week,  I’ll be wandering around there, maybe looking for some extra work.  I hope to see you.

 

 

Margot nears Troy with the Lockwood Bros barge from back in October. Watch the variety of backgrounds in this post, too.

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Jay Michael a few days ago passes by Con Hook.

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Amy C McAllister rounds the southern tip of Manhattan towing a capacious cargo barge Columbia Baltimore, capable of carrying 690 tees..

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Betty D light crosses the Upper Bay.   I didn’t say “Betty Delight,”  but the possibility for misunderstanding is there.

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Brendan Turecamo escorts Tammo inbound from the island of Jamaica.

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Fort McHenry waits over by IMTT.

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Sarah D pushes in some upstate rock.

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Fells Point crosses the Upper Bay bound for the Kills.

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And to finish with a photo from September, it’s Rae, standing by for the move of Wavertree.

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All photos by will Van Dorp.

 

 

A random gallivant around the sixth boro the other day showed these boats, starting with Iron Mike (1977) under the Williamsburg Bridge.

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a trio of Navigator (1981), Susan Miller (1981) , and Quantico Creek (2010) over by Con Hook,

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Robert IV (1975) a little farther north and east,

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Scott Turecamo (1998) headed for the Kills,

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HMS Liberty (1978) in the anchorage,

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Amberjack (1981) facing Yonkers,

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Barry Silverton (2015) swinging toward the Palisades, and

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Rhea I. Bouchard (1982) making way for a point up north.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Random means random, and I challenge you to come up with a more random set . . .

Let’s start with a Gmelin photo from 1930.  I’ll give the name of the tug later in this post so that all experts of arcane sixth boro history can play.  Since today is the V-Day, let me mention that Herbert Hoover was POTUS, and not very popular at that time, post-crash, in spite of his 1928 campaign slogan “A Chicken in Every Pot and a Car in Every Garage.”  Well, that did not work out so well.  A few things impress me about Hoover though, like . . . in what language would he and the First Lady–Lou–converse privately when guests were in the White House.  By the way, why is the 2nd Tuesday in November Election Day?  Answers at the end of this post.

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Here’s a photo from my archives, Surrie Moran (2000 built) assisting with a big south-bound Crowley barge El Rey (1979) in June 2013 on the Delaware River.  I was shooting against the morning sun.   You see a little of Cape Henry (1967) on the stern also.   Any guesses which Crowley tug was towing?

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And another photo from 2013, January,  in the KVK.  It’s Rebel, built 1976, with her odd hull.  Is she now scrapped?

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So now a few from the past week . . . James D. Moran (2015) passes the KV buoy heading for the North River.

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Genesis Victory (from 1981) heads into the Kills.

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The 2002 Labrador Sea comes in from somewhere out east.

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And over on a waterway I don’t get to see that often, I stumbled onto the 1940 Ireland,

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1958 Bergen Point, and

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the 1947 basic Harbor II.

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And since a lot of things are cyclical, we’re back at the mystery tug.

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With my magnifying glass, I read enough to make me think this is Richard J. Barrett, which would have been 11 years old in 1930.  Here’s Birk’s info. The ship is the 1925-launched MS Gripsholm, significant as the first transAtlantic liner powered by a diesel engine.

And Hoover and his wife spoke Mandarin for their secret asides when guests were in earshot.  I’m impressed.

And towing El Rey, here’s Sentry  (1977).

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And we have our 19th century agrarian roots to thank for the 2nd Tuesday being election day . .  . here.

 

 

Katanni and

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Sawyer I, these photos I took in September along the Saint Lawrence.

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I took the next photos in October.  Evans McKeil was built in Panama in 1936!   The cement barge she’s paired with–Metis— was built as a ship in 1956 and converted to a barge in 1991.

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Wilf Seymour was built in 1961 in Port Arthur TX.  I’ve always only seen her paired with Alouette Spirit.  Here she’s heading upbound into the Beauharnois Lock.   The digital readout (-0.5) indicates she’s using the Cavotec automated mooring system instead of lines and line handlers.

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Moving forward to Troy NY, I don’t think the name of this tug is D. A. Collins,   

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but I know these are Benjamin Elliot, Lucy H, and 8th Sea.

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Miss Gill waited alongside some scows at the booming port of Coeymans.

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And the big sibling Vane 5000 hp Chesapeake heads upriver with Doubleskin 509A.

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And one more autumnal shot with yellows, browns, grays, and various shades of red, and a busy Doris Moran and Adelaide.

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Will Van Dorp took all these photos.

 

In the drizzle, BBC Alabama awaits cargo in Port of Albany.

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Pocomoke transfers cargo,

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Brooklyn heads south,

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Hudson Valley sentinels keep vigil no matter

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how much rain falls,

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Doris hangs with Adelaide,

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as does Coral Coast with Cement Transporter 5300,

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Strider rests from striding,

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Union Dede docks at a port that 10 years ago was sleepy,

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HR Pike (?) rests on rolling spuds,

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Saugerties Light houses B&B guests,

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not far from Clermont, home of the father-in-law of the father of steam boating on the Hudson and then the Mississippi,

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Comet pushes Eva Leigh Cutler to the north,

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Spooky‘s colors look subdued in the fall colors, and

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two shipyard relatives meet.

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Will Van Dorp took all these photos in a 12-hour period.

Given the glorious sunshine, the transition from summer to fall begs another series.  Let’s start with Maule, 

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2/3s of her escort, and

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a fraction of her crew.

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Following in Maule‘s wake, Helsinki Bridge arrives, here with half its escort.

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McKinley Sea traverses the Upper Bay and passes

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UBC Mobile.

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In the harbor was Cordula Jacob and Seastar, as seen from two angles.

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with some ferries and a Miller’s Launch crew boat.

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Caitlin Ann and

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Miss Lizzy work the AK and in the

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KVK, for the last day, there are two glorious ships with bright futures . . .

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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Today’s a good day to return to this series I had going for a few years and now return to.  More Chrononauts in the next few days…

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But first, this vessel bringing in my favorite celebratory drink.

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The fabulous September weather has allowed this project to rush to completion.  Remember, tomorrow

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in early afternoon she goes on a towline back to South Street Seaport through a portion of the sixth boro of this city made great thanks to shipping work and capital.  You can watch from along the KVK, from the Battery, or from South Street Seaport Museum.

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The name paint is on the list of about a thousand “last” things to do before departure.

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Also, enjoying the spectacular equinox weather, the crewman who becomes almost invisible in the bow

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of this 1100′ box ship,  

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tethered to James D. Moran.

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More on Peking as she gets prepared for her home-going.  Doesn’t this look like a shipyard for the ages?

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All photos taken yesterday by Will Van Dorp.

Chrononauts here now refers to us, looking at photos from the past.  This summer, in one of my Great Lakes ports, i bought first two prints, then the whole album of over 50 prints, all taken in the sixth boro between the 1930s and the 1950s.  So let’s start with this one, taken in either 1948 or 1949,

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Willard A. Holbrook. 

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How about this one, and you can find the overlap:   S.S. Normandie (1932 –1941), Alice M. Moran (1925–1953), and New York Central Grain Elevator Pier 7 Weehawken  (1884–1962).

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I’d love to learn more about either of these photos.  They are stamped on the back as Gmelin, probably the photographer.

 

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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