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Click on the image below for an interactive map of this portion of the sixth boro.  Right now at about the 9 o’clock position you see two small white specks.  They

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are the huge spherical tanks seen off Barbara McAllister‘s stern.

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Consider the size of the wraparound stairs and you’ll understand why locally they’re called “gorilla’s balls.”.

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So here’s what the tugboat fueling station looks like from the north bank of the KVK, and

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here looking west.

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Here’s looking NE across the tank farm, and

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from the landslide looking eastward across Robbins Reef Light to Brooklyn.

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Off the bow of Oleander–the incoming small container ship, would be the Staten Island ferry racks,

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and here’s looking south across tanker Navig8 Spirit toward the salt pile. But here’s the surprise, inside the fence and between the tanks,

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there’s a very old cemetery, which pre-dates the use of this land for oil.

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It’s Constable Hook Cemetery, founded by Pieter van Buskirk.

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Who knew?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Many thanks to Jack Kennedy for arranging for this tour.

 

Here’s an index to the 44 prior posts by this name.  CMA CGM Parsifal here is heavily laden, looks huge–and for the sixth boro is one of the largest that have called to date–almost 11oo’ loa and around 8500 teu-capacity, but relative to the current largest container ship in the world is smaller by half, ranked by capacity.

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I’ve done lots of posts focusing on intriguing names, but Parsifal needs to be added to that list.  In the foreign-to-me world of opera, Parsifal was a “pure fool,” the only knight unsullied enough to get the magic sword back from the evil seductress Kundry.  Cool.

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Here’s JRT Moran–the sixth boro’s newest new tug–coming out to meet Troitsky Bridge.

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JRT teams up here with the venerable James Turecamo, a tandem that shows evolution in twin screw design over almost a half century.   Troitsky [trinity] Bridge is named for a structure in St. Petersburg;  for some reason it’s almost the name of a fun civil engineering competition.  Local high schools run such competitions also.

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Port Moody waits in the anchorage as USNS Red Cloud gets refurbished at GMD.

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I caught Leopard Sea in Nola here just over a year ago.

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Santa Pacific, with hatches cracked open, waits  . .  for orders?

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NS Antarctic gets around.

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Robert E. heads out for a job, passing NS Antarctic and  . . .

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Cielo di Milano, as Sandy Hook Pilots summer station boat New Jersey comes in for a call through the KVK.

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Living along the banks of the sixth boro has disadvantages, but I truly enjoy the fact that this too is part of the traffic.

 

All photos this month by Will Van Dorp.

As was true yesterday, all photos today were taken in the first 12 hours of 2016.  For Chatham, the last tug I saw in 2015, the year end/start distinction was likely irrelevant.  No doubt the same holiday treats were out in the galley in the wee hours of 2016 as were a few hours before in 2015.

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From a different angle as last night, here are Michael J,

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Camie,

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and the “weather tugs.”  I’m happy the precipitation of December 31 has ceased.

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Although some people movers waited in reserve, 

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another was cross-crissing the Elizabeth.  By the way, is this the same James C. Echols?  Is it still LNG powered?  Does anyone know where the new ferries are being built and delivery dates?

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The quick side ramp system impressed me.  It was in fact similar to a system on “water bus” I saw near Rotterdam a while back.

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Surrie heads back to base, passing BB-64 USS Wisconsin

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Recognize this vessel, which spent a little time in the sixth boro a bit over a year ago?

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It’s HMS Justice, slinging Bryant Sea now in the curvaceous Elizabeth River and

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passing Mahan, Stout, and

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Oscar Austin, far right.

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Closing out today . .  what can you do with $12 million and a 1962 North Sea trawler?  Check here for this story on explorer yacht Discovery.  Here’s another story with much better photos.   Docked astern of Discovery is Shearwater, which was doing a project in the sixth boro back in sumer 2013.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Technically the first vessel I saw–before dawn– in 2016 was Hudson River-built Jean Turecamo and then Surrie Moran, as they headed south to assist this outbound tanker, Kingcraft, which seems to be barely off the ways.

And once I spotted such a bright clean LNG vessel headed my way, my noirish self dissipates;  call me Marinus de Blauw.     Tugboat Jean Turecamo is off the starboard bow, whereas Surrie is invisible at the stern.   Parading behind are USCGC WPB 87361 Sea Horse and Vane’s Chatham.

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As it turned out, Kingcraft still had its USCG escort as it continued out the Thimble Shoals Channel of the CBBT, Morocco bound.

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From Island 1, to the north I could see a tug and barge headed southbound through the Chesapeake Channel between Island 3 and 4.

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It turned out to be Sea Robin towing  . . .

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Sugar Express . . . Florida bound, I presume.   Here’s more info on Sea Robin.

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And I include this next set as a jog-memory for myself:  at the Route 13 scenic area pull-off  in southern Kiptopeke, a look past the weirs I got a glimpse of a future destination . . .

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the concrete ships of the breakwater.

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I have to allow enough time to see them closer next time.

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More on the first twelve hours of 2016 tomorrow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Marginally related . . . concrete barges also languish on the Erie Canal.

Directly related . . . some previous posts featuring the Hampton Roads area are here, herehere, and here.

Differently marginally related:  Kingcraft–whatta name!!–is a new vessel;  Horizon Trader, seen in this sixth boro post from less than two years ago, is about to beach for the scrappers in India.

Remember the logic in this series is . . . the first pic of the month and the last pic of the month . . .

Early September found me still along the Acushnet . . .  Malena–as of this writing–is in Sierra Leone, having bounced around the Caribbean since departing New Bedford.

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By September’s end, Wavertree was slathered in a beautiful red primer.

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Early October . . . that’s North Star off the Orient Point, and Plum Gut, with Plum Island in the background.

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Late October . . . a conversation led to an invitation to tour iMTT Bayonne and see Marion Moran at the tug fuel station from the waterside.  I still need to post about that.

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November . . . and Med Sea bound for the Sound and beyond.

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Joyce D. Brown going back to the kills.

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And late in the month, my only view of Patty Nolan, on the hard in Verplanck. Click here for some of many posts on the 1931 Patty.

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Early December . . .it’s mild and I decided to experiment with some color separation on Margaret Moran. Click here for a post from seven-plus years ago with Margaret Moran  . . .

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And since December has not yet ended, I will post this in its incomplete state, with the promise of a “last December 2015”  post yet to come.

This is my last post for 2015.  Happy New Year.  May it be peaceful and safe.

If there’s a shortage of any kind of stuff these days, there seems to be a dire scarcity of compassion, tolerance,  . . .  So it doesn’t matter what you believe or don’t believe, I’m sure we have common ground in thinking we need

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peace on Earth and goodwill towards everyone, especially this year.  That’s what I see in these decorations and hear in the music.

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From here in NY’s sixth boro on bows and

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sterns.

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From the south,

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the middle,

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and the north . . .

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and from this card someone sent me . . . have a happy day.  And a calm and boring day;  let

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me explain.  Click on the image below to hear a song by Capt. Josh Horton that probably captures the sentiments of crews at sea today.

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Here was 2014, and here was 2013.  Also, two years ago it thrilled me to share photos I received from the good folks at Hughes Marine to get photos from 1997 —here –of the year the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree came downriver by tug and barge.  And more good folks at Cross Sound Ferry sent along photos from 2003, here, when their ferry North Star delivered the tree that year . . . crewed in part by Rockettes!

If you’ve got time today for the background on how NORAD started reporting on Santa movements back at the height (or depth) of the Cold War in 1955, click here.  Here’s another version of the same Cold War story.

Thanks to Brendan Matton for the photo of Paul Andrew, Tali Padilla for the photo of Z-One lit up at the San Juan dock, Lisa Kolibabek of Cape Cod and Bonnie Halda for Jupiter both on the Delaware River, and Mike Magnant for the be-snowmanned Toot Toot.  Barrel sent me the photo of the red clad beard guy on the green 29. I took the photos at South Street Seaport Museum.

Finally, if you want to squelch the “red elf” mythology, check out the name of this 1963-built bulker AND its status.

 

November, port month on tugster, ends here, making this GHP&W 30.  Here’s how the month began.  One thing I learned putting together this post is that Port Richmond and Mariner’s Harbor appear not to share a border, at least according to the wikipedia map.  Between the western edge of Port Richmond and the eastern edge of Mariner’s (the west side of the Bayonne Bridge) is a neighborhood called Elm Park.  I’d never heard of it.  Also, look at the northeast tip of Port Richmond . . . it’s in the water only and includes the Caddell yard.  Furthermore, Port Richmond never seems like much of a port if you see it by road only.  Click here for photos of the land portion of Port Richmond.  Click on the map to make it interactive.

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A google satellite view shows the northernmost margin of land is port-intensive.  Click here for many vintage photos of Port Richmond, pre-Bayonne Bridge, back when Port Richmond was a major ferry/rail link.

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Although the late fall midday sun backlit these shots, let’s cruise the waterside of Port Richmond, starting at its northeastern point, where the Wavertree (1885) project is ongoing.

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Delaware River & Bay Authority’s Delaware is undergoing some major repowering work. 

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Frying Pan . . . light of the night vessel from up at Pier 66 is having some work done.

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In the belly of Frying Pan, where the engine and machinery used to be, a night club sometimes comes to life.    Click here for some renderings of the vessel by the elusive bowsprite.

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Miss Liberty, built 1954, is nearly finished with this dry-docking.  Notice here she is high and dry?  Well, just 45 minutes later, she had been

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splashed and was being towed to a wharf by Caddell’s own L. W. Caddell (1990).

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Continuing to the west, it’s the yards of Reinauer and Moran. From l to r, here, it seems to be Meredith C. Reinauer (2003), Laurie Ann Reinauer (2009), Reinauer Twins (2011), and Dace Reinauer (1968 but JUST repowered). . . and Joan Turecamo with (?) Brendan Turecamo.  The McAllister tug between the Reinauer ATBs . . . I’ll guess is Bruce A. Marjorie B. McAllister.

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This photo, taken a half hour earlier and before Joan Turecamo (1980) tied up, shows Kimberly Turecamo (1980), the very new and beamy  J. R. T. Moran (2015), and Brendan (1975).

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On the west side of the Moran yard, it’s Cable Queen (1952).  Click here for photos of this cable-layer at work through the years.

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And for the last shot of Port Richmond–although this may be straying westward into Elm Park waters, it’s Metropolitan Marine Transportation’s newest Normandy.

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All the photos today by Will Van Dorp.

So as I said at the beginning of this post, so ends the “gunk holes, harbors, ports, and wharves” series.  However, precedent on this blog makes it really easy to do a Port Richmond 2, 3, 4 . . . . etc. post.  also, if any of you feel like contributing a set of photos from a port of gunk hole, no matter how large or obscure, I welcome it.  Besides, there’s always then possibility of doing an “upland” version of any port, focusing on land-based businesses serving the work vessels.

And as for December, let me reprint this idea for a December theme:

How about  antique/classic workboats, functioning or wrecked.  Of course, a definition for that category is impossible.  For example, NewYorkBoater says this:  ‘The definition of an antique boat according to Antique and Classic Boating Society is a boat built between 1919 and 1942.  A classic was built between 1943 and 1975 and the term contemporary, are boats built from 1976 and on.’  Hmm . . . what do you call an old vessel built before 1919 . . . a restoration project?  antediluvian?

If you take another transportation sector–automobiles, you get another definition:  25 years old or more.    And for the great race, here were the rules for this year:  “Vehicle entries must have been manufactured in 1972 or before.”  Next year’s cut-off will likely be 1973.

So my flexible definition is  . . . photo should have been taken in 1999 or before, by you or of you or a family member, and in the case of a wreck, probably identifiable.  Exception . . .  it could be a boat built before  . . . say  . . . 1965.”

Many thanks to all of you who sent along photos, contributed ideas, and commented in November.

or I can call this Port of Albany 2, or better still Ports of Albany and Rensselaer.  Albany’s fireboat Marine 1 has been on this blog here.  Anyone know where it was built?

The port has not one but . . .

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but two large cranes.

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And bulk cargo is transferred through the port in both directions, whether it be solid or

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dusty.

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Over on the Rensselaer side, scrap seems to be a huge mover.

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North of Port Albany is USS Slater, about which lots of posts can be found here.  But it’s never occurred to me until now that the colors used by Slater camouflage and NYS Marine Highway are a very similar gray and blue!

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Kathleen Turecamo (1968) has been in this port–135 miles inland–for as long as I’ve been paying attention, which is only a little over a decade.

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This September, NYS Canal Corp’s Tender #3, which probably dates from the 1930s, traveled south to the ports of Albany and Rensselaer.

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The port is also a vital petroleum center, both inbound and out.

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With the container train traffic along the the Hudson and the Erie Canal, I’m only less surprised than otherwise that Albany-Rensselaer currently is not a container port.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s general info about the Port of Albany, although a lot of info there seems a bit out of date.  For a blog that visits visits the ports of Albany and Rensselaer more regularly, check here.   Here’s the port of Albany website.

And last but not least, check Mark Woody Woods’ broad sampling of ships heading to and from Albany-Rensselaer.

 

Let’s go farther south–i.e., up the Elizabeth. Covered barge . . .

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pushed by Gram-Me.  Coal?

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Capt. Woody and Alexis of w3marine have the best logo.  See it better here. Fleetmate Ocean Endeavor was in yesterday’s post.

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Lorette is one of two Norfolk tugs that used to be Moran boats.

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As you can see by the livery, Ellie J is also a Norfolk tug, but although

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similar, Stevens Towing’s Island Express is not.

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Here’s a small portion of McAllister Virginia‘s fleet:  Nancy and Eileen.  The last time I saw Eileen she was returning a Staten Island ferry post rehab.

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Vulcan construction has its logo on a number of tugs here, including Arapaho,

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Aries,

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Capt. Ron L, and

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VMC Chattanooga.

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Alexander Duff is a Vane tug.

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Kodiak, here I think leaving the soybean depot– used to be Vane’s Capt. Russi.

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Kodiak has been in the sixth boro on a few occasions.  Here’s more of her current fleet:  Maverick, ?Southern Star?, and Challenger.

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Hoss, like the boats immediately above is also an Intracoastal Marine boat. Hoss is a close relative via Wiley Manufacturing of the sixth boro’s Patricia.   Sun Merchant, which I saw here in Savannah, is a Vane boat.

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Corman Marine’s Captain Mac is yet another tugboat in the Elizabeth owned by a construction company.

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Camie and Cajun look alike but may be owned by Robbins Maritime and Bay Transportation, respectively.

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Three Sisters seems to be owned by a family-oriented company called Smith Brothers.

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Elizabeth Ann, operated by Atlantic Gulf Towing, used to be known as El Hippo Grande, a truly satisfactory name for a workboat.

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And finally, we seem to have two Skanska-owned boats, Ranger and

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Cap’n Ed.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who imagined there’d be only about 10 photos in this post about a short section of the waterway in the Norfolk/Portsmouth VA area.  For the entirely delightful travel through the area, I am very grateful to the USMMA Sailing Foundation.

A request, though.   Over by the Norfolk Dredging yard, I saw their small tug Palmyra through the trees and could not get a good shot.  Has anyone taken one over the years?  If so, could you share it on this blog?  Send me an email, please.

Finally, some of you got an earlier version of this last night when I pushed the wrong button.  Sorry about that.  I could give other reasons for that error, but it was a slip and I had not intended you to think I had started using placeholder gibberish as captions.

Cheers.

 

It’s still November 2015, so for me, it’s day 22 of this focus.

Let’s head south again from Hampton Roads, where a lineup of MSC vessels includes a supply vessel called Supply.

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I guess this would be a small Navy yard tug.  Click here (and scroll) to see a variant with roll bars.   Here it closes the security gate after a Moran tug has come inside.

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More security is provided by WPB-87329 Cochito.

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In order from near to far on this foggy day are LSD-46 Tortuga, DDG-103 Truxton, and USNS T-AH-20 Comfort.

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Emily Anne McAllister (2003) waits at the Norfolk International Terminals.

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And there’s a long list of commercial tugboats, more than I want to squeeze into this post.  So let’s start with Ocean Endeavor (1966),

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Night Hawk (1981),

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Dauntless II (1953),

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Choptank (2006),

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Payton Grace Moran (2015),

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Goose Creek (1981), and finally for now

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Steven McAllister (1963).

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All foggy/rainy photos above by Will Van Dorp.

One of these days we’ll meander farther south on the Elizabeth River aka ICW.  In the meantime, if you have photos of work vessels from any port huge or tiny, get in touch;  there are still a few days of November left.

And since we’re a week or so from December, my idea for next month’s collaboration is “antique/classic” workboats, functioning or wrecked.  Of course, a definition for that category is impossible.  For example, NewYorkBoater says this:  “The definition of an antique boat according to Antique and Classic Boating Society is a boat built between 1919 and 1942.  A classic was built between 1943 and 1975 and the term contemporary, are boats built from 1976 and on.”  Hmm . . . what do you call an old vessel built before 1919 . . . a restoration project?  antediluvian?

 

If you take another transportation sector–automobiles, you get another definition:  25 years old or more.    And for the great race, here were the rules for this year:  “Vehicle entries must have been manufactured in 1972 or before.”  Next year’s cut-off will likely be 1973.

So my flexible definition is  . . . photo should have been taken in 1999 or before, by you or of you or a family member, and in the case of a wreck, probably identifiable.  Exception . . .  it could be a boat built before  . . . say  . . . 1965.

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