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Count them . . . at least four very different vessels:  Saint Emilion with barge, JRT waiting to assist, Grace D shuttling people and supplies, and a sloop. 

Here’s more from hither and yon around the sixth boro:  Navigator at “old navy” topping off the ferry reserves, 

Popeye fishing in front of Ellis Island, 

Meagan Ann taking the stern of this interesting sailing trawler,

another sloop passing the Statue line, a Circle Line boat, as well as a Statue Cruises vessel,

and a NY Media Boat touring RIB.

Yes, I’m back to that trawler.  It’s called Briney Bus out of Miami, but besides that, I don’t know much.  My guess is that, like many boats, it’s heading for the  NYS Canal system, which opened two days ago.

The parting shot . . . Meagan Ann.

All photos and any errors, WVD.

 

Floating cranes have been featured here before, but never have I posted photos of a crane so sweet.  Let me explain.

For starters, though, Brendan Turecamo had the barge alongside

and was headed up the North River along my same route.

I hadn’t much of an idea what their destination was until

I saw this sign, name or not, but it told me where it was going.  Double click on the image if you must.  Flo-Sweet 2 could have only one goal, as there’s only one place left in the greater sixth boro for sweet commodities. Sweet nothings, of course, have a place everywhere, but I digress.

beyond WTC1 to ASR in Yonkers.

All photos, WVD, who wonders whether any western Louisiana sugars get further processed along the hudson.

 

Ambrose Channel late morning yesterday

saw the arrival of this vessel, 321′ x 41′ and with that pennant flying from the masthead at 157′.

Launched in 1914 in Bremerhaven, and having changed national registry many times,

Statsraad Lehmkuhl is on its One Ocean Expedition, having left Norway in August.

New York is one of 36 stops it will make on a 55,000 nm circumnavigation worldwide.  Hop aboard via their FB page here.

 

By noon yesterday

she had anchored, basking in sunshine

just off the Statue.

All photos, WVD, with conveyance thanks to New York Media Boat.

The three-masted barque visited the sixth boro back in 1964, and maybe since then as well.

More photos and inside information can be found here.

More info about its multiple changes in ownership since 1914, here.

For other posts about visiting tall ships, click here.

 

See the man on the pier using his cell phone to get a photo?  I wonder what he imagined he was looking at, other than a group on the water on a spectacular December day.  Did he know he was witnessing the culmination of an odyssey?

The Columbia, Snake, Clark Fork, Missouri, Mississippi, [to saltwater] Mobile, Tombigbee, Tenn-Tom Waterway, Tennessee, Ohio, Kentucky, Kanawha, Allegheny, Chadakoin, Lake Chautauqua, Lake Erie, Erie Canal, Seneca, Oneida, Mohawk, Hudson . . .  [I may have left one out].  What do they have in common?

Neal Moore‘s paddled them stringing together a path on his 675-day canoe trip along his 7500-mile route of inland rivers from saltwater Astoria OR to the saltwater Statue of Liberty, an extreme form of social distancing during the time of Covid.   Photos of the last several miles follow.  

Note that the other paddlers traveled to the sixth boro of NYC to join him for the last few miles,

just as they–“river angels”– had during different segments of the 22-month trip.  Some elites of paddling enjoyed the sixth boro yesterday.

From Pier 84 Manhattan to the Statue and back, they rode the ebb.

 

Why, you might be wondering?  Moore, a self-described expatriate who wanted to explore the United States in the reverse order of the historical east-to-west “settlement” route, sought out to meet people, find our commonalities, our united strength.  Some might call that direction “the wrong way.”

After one circumnavigation of Liberty Island following his paddling up and down all those watersheds, the journey was done.  After unpacking his Old Town canoe, he scrambled

with assistance onto the Media Boat, triumphantly but humbly.

 

He stepped over onto a larger vessel in the NYMB fleet, for interviews and a trip back to terra firma,

22rivers’ goal completed, for now.

All photos, WVD, thanks to New York Media Boat conveyance.  I have many, many more photos.

For Ben McGrath’s New Yorker piece on Neal Moore, click here.  Also, check out Ben’s book Riverman.  Let me add two more references:  another McGrath article and a book Mississippi Solo here.

Of course, Neal’s whole epic can be traced at his site, 22Rivers.

I first learned of 22Rivers from Bob Stopper, who met Neal in Lyons NY two months ago, and I and posted about it here (scroll).

More links as follows:

Norm Miller, Missouri River guide

John Ruskey, lower Mississippi River system guide who was on the Hudson yesterday.  He’s also the founder of Quapaw Canoe Company.

Tom Hilton, Astoria-based Fisher Poet, whom I met last night.

And at the risk of leaving someone out, here’s a longtime favorite of mine, an account of a rowboat from Brooklyn to Eastport ME by way of New Orleans . . . Nathaniel Stone’s On the Water.

Who’d I leave out?

I’ve been meaning to ask about this lumber on the piers at Red Hook container terminal.  Not quite a year ago an unusual looking vessel called Mozu Arrow deposited these bundles of lumberHere‘s another shot showing all the bundles.  All through the stories of lumber being outrageously expensive,  this lumber stayed here.  In some places, the coverings have ripped off leaving the wood exposed to the weather, wasting away.  Can anyone tell me the story of this lumber and why it hasn’t moved in 11 months.  As of this writing, the lumber carrier is traveling between South Korea and British Columbia, light maybe, having deposited lumber on piers in Busan perhaps?  On second thought, would this vessel travel sans cargo across the Pacific?  What cargo might it be carrying to Canada?

Brendan Turecamo is a regular on this blog;  behold about nine feet of the boat you never see when she’s working.

Here’s a limitation of gantry cranes;  if you have a container ship loaded higher than the cranes can accommodate, getting a last box in place means lifting to the height and then sliding it in aft to fore.  Understand what’s happening here?  The box was lifted farther “back” than the empty slot, and now the crane operator is sliding it in laterally, toward the right in this photo.  Is this a common occurrence on these “tall ships,” to give a new meaning to the phrase?

Do you remember “you go girl” graffiti on a ferry just west of the Bayonne Bridge?  Well, clearly it has shifted over toward the Bayonne, New Jersey, side and is showing a different and more corroded side.  I wonder where she goes next.

From this angle, there appears to be quite a few Reinauer tugs in their yard.  While we’re playing an Andy Rooney and asking questions about everything, has anyone learned more about the WindServe Marine toehold within the Reinauer real estate here?  Isn’t it hard to believe that Andy Rooney has been gone for almost a decade now?

Getting back to the warehouse sheds in Red Hook, is it possible this very experienced tow truck is there to prosecute any violators who choose to trespass and/or dock?  I saw a more intimidating sign and sight in Belfast ME some years ago in the second photo here.

To show location of these signs and the antique tow truck, note it in the wider view photo below.

Shall we leave it here?    I suppose.  All photos, WVD, with conveyance from the New York Media Boat.

 

Gene Chaser appears to be a sister of Ad-Vantage, which appeared here a year and a half ago.  Click on the link at the beginning of the first sentence and you’ll see some interior shots of this 55-meter yacht support vessel. At some point, yacht support vessel Ad-Vantage was available for charter for a mere 67,500 Euro per week.

The script below the name Gene Chaser puzzles me, especially since I see signs for multiplication and addition.  Maybe someone can translate?

Shooting into the sun from a low-on-the-river angle provides this unsatisfactory image. 

 Shooting down from Brooklyn Heights, as Claude Scales did for this shot, gets this image.  Is that a submarine near the stern of Gene Chaser?  In case you were wondering about the name, it makes sense when you consider the vessel below is the annex to Dr. Jonathan Rothberg‘s Gene Machine, currently off Connecticut. Rothberg is an American chemical engineer, biologist, inventor and entrepreneur. His business involves developing a high-speed “next-gen” DNA sequencing process.  I think these vessels make him a polymath on the seas, an early 21st century version of Jules Verne’s Captain Nemo.  

On the west side of Manhattan North Cove the other day, I walked past this eye catcher . .  .

The cockpit of this “center console” Alen Yacht 45 is quite narrow and not enclosed,

but don’t underestimate this

Turkish beauty.

And to go to the other end of the tech and financial spectrum, what’s the story with the heavily loaded red 16′ Old Town Penobscot Royalex canoe?  The paddler is not yet IN the sixth boro, but heading this way.

It’s Neal Moore, heading 7000+ miles from Astoria OR, city of the fisher-poets, TO the sixth boro, with an ETA of . . .  whenever he gets here, but likely in December or January, depending on the assistance of “river angels” and relying on his own fortitude. As of this posting, he’s paddling the Erie Canal somewhere east of Lyons and west of Oneida . . . .  That trip is longer than and tougher than the Great Loop.  Technically, the Erie Canal is closing soon, but it’ll be open for him.  Wave if you see him.

t o

Check out his website for lots of photos and articles like those excerpted below.

 

Many thanks to Claude and to the webmaster at 22Rivers for their photos;  all others, WVD.

I’d planned something else for today, but then I saw the tree!  See it on the bow of Pilot No 2 New Jersey?  And that reminded me it was Three Kings day, Epiphany.

 

The colors are always best when wind chills are biting.   Pilot No 2 and the smaller boat, America, went out as it were in a procession.

America stayed out over the horizon, but New Jersey returned, tree intact.

This reminded me also of photos I’d taken from New York Media Boat and had intended to use for my Christmas post.  From its station out at the sea end  of Ambrose Channel, the VZ Bridge is clearly seen.

 

Coming from sea, this is first glimpse of the port, two states and all six boros.

Safe year to all.

All photos, WVD.  Thanks to New York Media Boat.

Six years ago, I posted this for Three Kings.  And the tree makes this a great complementary bookend for this season.

Behold OceanXplorer.  I missed them in a search because I was looking for an Ocean Explorer.  Of the many exotics that have called in the sixth boro in recent years, this one stands out.

She started life as Volstad Surveyor in 2010, a much more spartan-looking workboat, launched at Construcciones Navales Paulino Freire, Spain.  Since then she’s seen major modification inside and out by OceanX, in partnership with BBC’s Blue Planet and James Cameron, who “sailed” to the bottom of the Mariana Trench in 2012.

OceanX is the project of a Queens native named Ray Dalio, in town for a few days. 

Media was invited but somehow tugster was omitted from the guest list . . . at least so far.

Look at this and then see

this labeled diagram from here.  If you do FB, here‘s a story from Good Morning America of the previous boat in operation in mid-2019.

A comparison with Jacques Cousteau has been made;  Calypso was also a made-over workboat, and big money was involved there too.  In the photo below, note the person on the dock off the stern line of the vessel?

All photos, WVD.  Calypso is currently still in rebuild in Turkey, SE of Istanbul.

Several other projects come to mind:  Lone Ranger and Ocearch. If I’ve never posted my Ocearch story, here it is.

Barebones post today . . .  since these photos I took between 1030 and 1130.  By now, 1230, they’ve dropped the pilot at the end of Ambrose and set a course for . . .  warmer weather and

(but first sails need to be raised…

and adjusted.)

… warmer weather in Dominican Republic, where a load of cocoa awaits in that tropical heat, two weeks or so ahead.

Mid North River, they tacked and 

waved at the French Lady and

us . .  on the Media Boat

and they headed for the opening.

Bon voyage.  Many thanks to Bjoern at the New York Media Boat.

All photos, WVD.

More context . . .  see previous installments of Grain de Sail here. For info on their cargo, click here.

I look forward to seeing this wine transporter up close in a few days.  Meanwhile, hat tip to Bjoern Kils of NY Media Boat for getting this one.  Cargo . .  includes 18,000 bottles of French wine, many varieties.

Many thanks, Bjoern.  See his blog here.  See Grain de Sail website in English here.

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