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July 13 saw my first sighting of this intrepid anachronism, here juxtaposed with a 21st century realm of Logi.

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She was then probing the inland seas, seeing how far she could voyage, possibly looking for a passage to the Mississippi and the Gulf via Lake Michigan.  OK, indulge me on that speculation.

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Our paths next crossed on September 1, as she made her way through the Erie Canal,

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with all the modifications that entailed and the use of sunstones to

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avoid getting lost in the meandering rivers.

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And late last week, Bjoern Kils of the New York Media Boat got this fabulous shot of her scoping out the sixth boro before

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she slipped into a Manhattan cove for a spell.

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I missed the display in the Winter Garden and hope I can get there again before the boat moves on.

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Many thanks to Bjoern for use of that photo. For more of Bjoern’s photos, click here.  All others by Will Van Dorp.  And following up on some info from Conrad Milster, here’s a video on a Viking ship that traveled to Chicago in 1893.  Yes, 1893!!   And the crossing from Bergen NO to New Haven CT with Captain Magnus Andersen and 11 crew took 30 days.  Then the vessel, dubbed Viking, traveled up the Hudson and through the pre-Barge Canal on its way to Chicago with stops in Albany, Syracuse, Rochester, and Cleveland.  The vessel is still there in Geneva IL.  Here’s another video on the ship.

To pick up on the NY canals’ connection, as we approach the bicentennial of the start of the Erie Canal, it would be great to seek out and archive any photos–still languishing in local photo troves–of the 1893 passage there of Viking, as well as of any other outstanding vessels that have traversed the Canal throughout its history.

And since my focus these days is on chrononauts, there is this fleet that comes through the sixth boro every few years.  I caught up with them in Newburgh in 2012 and Oswego in 2014.

 

 

I choose to interrupt the “go west” series here.  It will continue soon.  And why?  Late yesterday, emerging from the fires over in Sarnia it came . . .

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to enter the Black River.

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Draken‘s a beauty with carved European oakwood

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like above on the bow cap rail and below on one of many oarlock covers.

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Below it’s the captain to the right and the district 3 Lakes Pilot to the left as

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international crew prepares to slips the dock lines and

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head northward into a stormy Huron night.

Take a fishing trawler built in 1928 and converted to a minesweeper some 10 years later.  After the war, convert it into a North Sea freighter, which then crosses the Atlantic to Kingston NY, where the photo below was taken.  To digress, I recognize Matilda (click and scroll)  on the hard behind the freighter but have no information of the two tugs to the right.  The photo below comes thanks to Nobby Peers, who worked on the old freighter in the mid-1990s, and it changed the course of his life.

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So you might wonder about the connection of the freighter to this barque in Vanuatu?   The next four photos come thanks to Mike Weiss.

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Here’s the same barque at sea.

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Ditto, the barque seen here of Mangareva in French Polynesia.

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And the answer is . . . they are all the same hull!

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And finally, here are three photos I took when Picton Castle was in the Hudson in May 2012.  Tomorrow morning she sails out of Lunenburg NS for a five-month voyage. 

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She’s registered in the Cook Islands. 

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Many thanks to Nobby and Mike for use of these photos.   Fair winds . . . Picton Castle.

And here, verbatim again, is my call for collaboration for November posts.  Thanks to those of you who have already responded.

“…I invite your help for November posts.  All month long I hope to feature different ports–harbors–waterways and their workboats, which means not only towing vessels, but also ferries, fish boats, maintenance vessels, even yachts with professional crews.  I’ve been traveling a lot the past few months and have a fairly large backlog of boats from ports–harbors–waterways mostly in New England.  But as a social medium, this blog thrives on collaboration, so no matter which waters are near you,  I’m inviting you to send along photos of workboats from ports I might not get to.  I’d need at least three interesting photos to warrant a focus on a port.  Here are examples I’ve already done that illustrate what I’m thinking to do.”

I first thought to call this PBB 5, following on 1, 2, 3, and 4 from last year, taken from a harbor area in “north” Amsterdam called “place beyond belief.”.  But sometimes straightforward is clearest.

Check out Half Moon, gone over the Ocean and now leading a parade  . . . hanging with the likes of Grace Kelly.

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Gotta sing.  Remember the armada that traveled up the north River six years ago?  They traveled with their own song leader, Reinier Sijpkens, who got them going at night.

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Big in the middle ground, it’s Kruzenshtern.

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And in this batch of photos sent along by Fred Trooster and taken by Fons Tuijl, I can see converted trawler  Pedro Doncker Polish training vessel Dar Mlodziezy

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retired Dutch research vessel Castor,

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pilot boat Polaris,

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the nearest one here frigate Shtandart,

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Indian training ship Tarangini,

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Colombian training ship ARC Gloria–who wow’ed in the sixth boro here a few years ago,

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Portuguese training vessel Sagres–recently in Greenport NY– and repurposed minesweeper Naaldwijk PW-809.

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Of course . . . so much more, but I wasn’t there yesterday.

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Again, many thanks to Fred and Fons for these photos.

For more shots, see gCaptain here.

 

Back in March, I posted these photos taken by Xtian Herrou.  Xtian . ..  today I return the favor.  Tomorrow too.

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Pilot arrives at L’Hermione

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Tricoleur is hosted at the stern.

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Gunners prepare the guns for the salute.

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Hands hook the anchor ring for further hoisting.

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Hands on the wheel

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L’Hermione enters the Narrows and passes Fort Wadsworth

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James Turecamo delivers a docking pilot just off the French Statue.

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And I’ll pick up the story here tomorrow.  Many thanks to Bjoern Kils and the NYMedia Boat for a fun ride.  After a night of thunderstorms and rain, daybreak brought blue skies and sunshine.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.   Also, merci Lafayette!

Today’s photos come from Xtian Herrou.  See the tug over there, the one the sailor in red must be looking at?  By the way, I’ve posted Xtian’s photos here and here before.  The rigging that dominates the photo below propels a vessel that will be making a stop in the sixth boro this coming summer.  Any guesses?  Her name–or rather the translation thereof–is a matter of some difference of opinion.

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There’s the tug, Abeille Bourbon.

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The sailing vessel is L’Hermione.  Here’s the name matter as described by Xtian:  “There is a fault in her name because of the English speakers who removed L’ as it means the but with the French navy for some ships the Le– La or L’ is really part of the name.  The apostrophe does not really exist in English, and on AIS her name is Lhermione to be correctly alphabetically placed at L.  Furthermore, the Association name is wrong as Hermione, and the mistake was discovered too late *:"> Piquage de fard.  A similar difference exists between the  French La Fayette and the English Lafayette, which, given my last name (Van Dorp or Vandorp or van Dorp), I understand clearly . . .

Rick “old salt” did a post here about this some months back.  I especially enjoyed the discussion in “comments” section.

On cold days, “picturing” warmer months helps stave off the cold . .  for a while.  But this post is about vessels with this name, one of which is a 1957 passenger vessel that has recently been chosen for some high-and-dry maintenance work.  Actually it’s called Mayflower II, which I’ve alluded to once in this 2010 post. Rick at Old Salt blog recently did a post about Mayflower II in which he refers to the illustrious captain of the vessel on her maiden voyage from Europe to the sixth boro.  Does anyone know whereabouts of photos of her in our fair harbor?  of the ticker tape parade?  But I digress.

Currently you’d have to go to Mystic–not Plimoth–to see this replica vessel.  See the haul out here.

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The second photo here comes from Louise on tug Jaguar.  Thanks for photos 1 and 3–7 to Benjamin Moll, pictured on Louise’s photo and whose “photos and musings” you may follow here.  Photos 8 and 9 of Mayflower high and dry in Mystic should be credited to Norman Brouwer, whose most recent book is Steamboats on Long Island Sound, which I need to read soon.   The last photo, which I took in the Savannah River,  shows one of 23 other vessels–according to the USCG registry–named Mayflower.

 

 

It’s really this although it looks like this.  They’re actually supposed to look like this, NOT heart-shaped.

Enough frivolity.  Be nice today and loving.

All these photos I took in Brooklyn locations in September  2009.

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Brooklyn Navy yard. . . .

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and

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Atlantic Basin.

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Some decades ago, I knew a schooner in Newburyport called Hearts Desire, but otherwise, there is a dearth of vessels with nomenclaturus valentinus.  Why?

Although bowsprite put something different up, here’s my favorite one of her past V-day posts.

Left to right at the Narrows ahead of this front are Maersk Detroit, SSV Corwith Cramer, Oleander, and CMA CGM Utrillo.

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SSV Corwith Cramer is a brigantine.

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Also, racing in ahead of the storm was this unidentified sloop,

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Wooley Bully,

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Hindu, 

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and Joan Turecamo with Nomadic Hjellestad.

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And look at that rain.

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All fotos this morning by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s the treat I’ll leave you with for a few days.  The twin towers in the background should clearly state we aren’t in Kansas or 2013 anymore.  Please comment on your speculations.   Foto #1

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This is from the converging waters just south of the Battery.  Notice the towers to the right.    Foto#2

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Note the stripe on Coursen‘s bow.   Foto #3

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Note the I-beam structure to the right.  Foto #4

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Note the relative positions of the towers and the Manhattan-side Holland Tunnel vent.  Foto #5

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Again, thanks in advance for your comments and reminiscences.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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