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It’s that time again . . .  a glance back at exactly a decade ago.  Back in June 2009, the 400th anniversary of the Half Moon going up the Hudson kicked off with a 20th century version of the Half Moon going up the Hudson.  Note the banner hung to the old TZ Bridge along the right side of the photo.   That replica is now in the Netherlands, looking for a new home, and that bridge–parts of it–have become fish structure somewhere off Long Island.

A newish boat in town was Peter F. Gellatly, now Vane’s Long Island.

Bounty–alas her fate–was still an irregular visitor to the sixth boro.  Here she’s made up to Harvey just outboard of Frying Pan.

Brian Nicholas moves a scrap barge out of the East River.

Paul T. Moran made one of her really rare visits to the sixth boro.

Container vessels calling in the ports of NY and NJ had not yet become UL . . .  ultra large versions

Harvey follows Half Moon northbound on the Hudson.

Michigan Service and Erie Service gather near IMTT.

Sisters assists with a tanker, and

here’s more of the River Day procession marking the year of Half Moon the first.

All photos taken in June 2009 by Will Van Dorp.

Tinkering with the digital file, I’ve made SSV Corwith Cramer clearer here than she was to the naked eye as she came through the foggy Narrows yesterday morning.

Maintaining this blog over many years and springtimes  has taught me how much fog is a spring phenomenon.  Here on a clearer day, Corwith Cramer (1987) raced into the Narrows ahead of a near-summer rainstorm.

USNS Pomeroy is always gray, but she’s even grayer in the fogs of spring.

Had the fog not been here, you’d see the cliffs of Manhattan out beyond this car float,

and to my naked, non-corrected, non-digital eyes, Joyce was much less clear than she is here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s grateful for assistance with photo manipulation tools.

GWA stands “go[ing] west again,”  the next set of posts all attempting to catch myself and maybe you up, if you’re following along, with random and I hope interesting photos from the past almost three weeks.  I realize that catching up is impossible, and in this case while I had vacated the sixth boro, big stuff happened.

A word that comes to mind is protean– named for Proteus.  Type “define: protean” into google and you’ll appreciate why it’s difficult to catch up.  But here goes.

Within a half hour of departing Warren RI, we pass Naema and

Lionheart.  Do check the links.  Either would be worthy of a post in itself.

And still north of the Rte 138 bridge, we see NOAA R/V Henry B Bigelow.

On the cusp of Block Island Sound, we encounter inbound Atlantic Pioneer, where you’d expect her returning from a run. Here’s a post I did almost exactly two years ago when Atlantic Pioneer components still needed to be combined at the shipyard.

A bit further, it’s Carol Jean and Islander, both Block Island bound, although one will arrive much before the other.

By now, we’re into Long Island Sound and being overtaken by darkness.  That’s Atlantic Navigator II as a speck heading toward us.

This dawn photo found us within NYC and approaching the East river.  It’s Fort Totten, designed for the entire US by Robert E Lee.  Here could be a dilemma:  there’s no debate that I know of of striking his name from the credits for this fort.

We pass HuntsPoint Produce Market,

the floating pool,

Marty C–a Weeks tug I’ve never seen,

the “north end” of Roosevelt Island with the Blackwell Island Light,

Gabby L Miller pushing past Cornell Tech‘s yet-to-be used buildings,

the Brooklyn Navy yard with Asphalt Sailor and –I believe– the old Great Point,

swimmers in the water doing a Manhattan circumnatation,

and–let’s end it here for today–a yacht  named  Vava II.  Here’s info on her owner.

Protean  . . . day 1?  It’s not even over, and I think so.

Lots more to come.

 

and they skip the sixth boro….  They were in New London some years back and here too . . ., but 2017 has gone from Charleston to Bermuda, and from there to Boston, Quebec City and Halifax . . .   All these photos come compliments of Sean McQuilken…

And in order, it’s Libertad, who once long ago in 1969 called at South Street Seaport, here (and scroll) to deliver some original spars for Wavertree  ,

Oosterschelde, the 99-year-old,

Alexander von Humboldt II,  (the oldster of this set, albeit one with a major reinvention),

El Galeon, whom I first saw in San Juan, 

Spirit of South Carolina

Lynx,

Pride of Baltimore II, and

When and If, who traveled the Erie Canal a few years back to get worked on on Seneca Lake, all great ships . . .  Maybe one of these years, Wavertree and Peking will join in the fun . . . just maybe…  And Peking has its share of adventure awaiting it this summer, with loading anticipated now early in the second week of July.

But I won’t be in Boston, because this weekend is also the mermaid’s conclave . . .  and I head to the heartland and off the grid right after that . . .

Again, many thanks to Sean for these photos.

 

July 13 saw my first sighting of this intrepid anachronism, here juxtaposed with a 21st century realm of Logi.

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She was then probing the inland seas, seeing how far she could voyage, possibly looking for a passage to the Mississippi and the Gulf via Lake Michigan.  OK, indulge me on that speculation.

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Our paths next crossed on September 1, as she made her way through the Erie Canal,

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with all the modifications that entailed and the use of sunstones to

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avoid getting lost in the meandering rivers.

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And late last week, Bjoern Kils of the New York Media Boat got this fabulous shot of her scoping out the sixth boro before

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she slipped into a Manhattan cove for a spell.

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I missed the display in the Winter Garden and hope I can get there again before the boat moves on.

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Many thanks to Bjoern for use of that photo. For more of Bjoern’s photos, click here.  All others by Will Van Dorp.  And following up on some info from Conrad Milster, here’s a video on a Viking ship that traveled to Chicago in 1893.  Yes, 1893!!   And the crossing from Bergen NO to New Haven CT with Captain Magnus Andersen and 11 crew took 30 days.  Then the vessel, dubbed Viking, traveled up the Hudson and through the pre-Barge Canal on its way to Chicago with stops in Albany, Syracuse, Rochester, and Cleveland.  The vessel is still there in Geneva IL.  Here’s another video on the ship.

To pick up on the NY canals’ connection, as we approach the bicentennial of the start of the Erie Canal, it would be great to seek out and archive any photos–still languishing in local photo troves–of the 1893 passage there of Viking, as well as of any other outstanding vessels that have traversed the Canal throughout its history.

And since my focus these days is on chrononauts, there is this fleet that comes through the sixth boro every few years.  I caught up with them in Newburgh in 2012 and Oswego in 2014.

 

 

I choose to interrupt the “go west” series here.  It will continue soon.  And why?  Late yesterday, emerging from the fires over in Sarnia it came . . .

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to enter the Black River.

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Draken‘s a beauty with carved European oakwood

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like above on the bow cap rail and below on one of many oarlock covers.

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Below it’s the captain to the right and the district 3 Lakes Pilot to the left as

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international crew prepares to slips the dock lines and

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head northward into a stormy Huron night.

Take a fishing trawler built in 1928 and converted to a minesweeper some 10 years later.  After the war, convert it into a North Sea freighter, which then crosses the Atlantic to Kingston NY, where the photo below was taken.  To digress, I recognize Matilda (click and scroll)  on the hard behind the freighter but have no information of the two tugs to the right.  The photo below comes thanks to Nobby Peers, who worked on the old freighter in the mid-1990s, and it changed the course of his life.

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So you might wonder about the connection of the freighter to this barque in Vanuatu?   The next four photos come thanks to Mike Weiss.

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Here’s the same barque at sea.

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Ditto, the barque seen here of Mangareva in French Polynesia.

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And the answer is . . . they are all the same hull!

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And finally, here are three photos I took when Picton Castle was in the Hudson in May 2012.  Tomorrow morning she sails out of Lunenburg NS for a five-month voyage. 

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She’s registered in the Cook Islands. 

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Many thanks to Nobby and Mike for use of these photos.   Fair winds . . . Picton Castle.

And here, verbatim again, is my call for collaboration for November posts.  Thanks to those of you who have already responded.

“…I invite your help for November posts.  All month long I hope to feature different ports–harbors–waterways and their workboats, which means not only towing vessels, but also ferries, fish boats, maintenance vessels, even yachts with professional crews.  I’ve been traveling a lot the past few months and have a fairly large backlog of boats from ports–harbors–waterways mostly in New England.  But as a social medium, this blog thrives on collaboration, so no matter which waters are near you,  I’m inviting you to send along photos of workboats from ports I might not get to.  I’d need at least three interesting photos to warrant a focus on a port.  Here are examples I’ve already done that illustrate what I’m thinking to do.”

I first thought to call this PBB 5, following on 1, 2, 3, and 4 from last year, taken from a harbor area in “north” Amsterdam called “place beyond belief.”.  But sometimes straightforward is clearest.

Check out Half Moon, gone over the Ocean and now leading a parade  . . . hanging with the likes of Grace Kelly.

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Gotta sing.  Remember the armada that traveled up the north River six years ago?  They traveled with their own song leader, Reinier Sijpkens, who got them going at night.

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Big in the middle ground, it’s Kruzenshtern.

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And in this batch of photos sent along by Fred Trooster and taken by Fons Tuijl, I can see converted trawler  Pedro Doncker Polish training vessel Dar Mlodziezy

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retired Dutch research vessel Castor,

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pilot boat Polaris,

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the nearest one here frigate Shtandart,

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Indian training ship Tarangini,

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Colombian training ship ARC Gloria–who wow’ed in the sixth boro here a few years ago,

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Portuguese training vessel Sagres–recently in Greenport NY– and repurposed minesweeper Naaldwijk PW-809.

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Of course . . . so much more, but I wasn’t there yesterday.

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Again, many thanks to Fred and Fons for these photos.

For more shots, see gCaptain here.

 

Back in March, I posted these photos taken by Xtian Herrou.  Xtian . ..  today I return the favor.  Tomorrow too.

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Pilot arrives at L’Hermione

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Tricoleur is hosted at the stern.

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Gunners prepare the guns for the salute.

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Hands hook the anchor ring for further hoisting.

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Hands on the wheel

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L’Hermione enters the Narrows and passes Fort Wadsworth

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James Turecamo delivers a docking pilot just off the French Statue.

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And I’ll pick up the story here tomorrow.  Many thanks to Bjoern Kils and the NYMedia Boat for a fun ride.  After a night of thunderstorms and rain, daybreak brought blue skies and sunshine.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.   Also, merci Lafayette!

Today’s photos come from Xtian Herrou.  See the tug over there, the one the sailor in red must be looking at?  By the way, I’ve posted Xtian’s photos here and here before.  The rigging that dominates the photo below propels a vessel that will be making a stop in the sixth boro this coming summer.  Any guesses?  Her name–or rather the translation thereof–is a matter of some difference of opinion.

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There’s the tug, Abeille Bourbon.

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The sailing vessel is L’Hermione.  Here’s the name matter as described by Xtian:  “There is a fault in her name because of the English speakers who removed L’ as it means the but with the French navy for some ships the Le– La or L’ is really part of the name.  The apostrophe does not really exist in English, and on AIS her name is Lhermione to be correctly alphabetically placed at L.  Furthermore, the Association name is wrong as Hermione, and the mistake was discovered too late *:"> Piquage de fard.  A similar difference exists between the  French La Fayette and the English Lafayette, which, given my last name (Van Dorp or Vandorp or van Dorp), I understand clearly . . .

Rick “old salt” did a post here about this some months back.  I especially enjoyed the discussion in “comments” section.

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