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Here’s the fleet arrival extravaganza from three years ago.  And here are installments 1  2 and 3 of the arrival of a special vessel of the LPD set.

I got my spot early, and had some surprises . . . like this medium endurance cutter heading OUT to meet the fleet.

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WMEC 905 Spencer

There were also these four yard patrol craft doing the same,

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Training vessels from Annapolis

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YP 705

and this tropical architecture (!!?) under the palm-tree grove over by Fort Wadsworth.  What’s going on?  It’s Cuba at the Narrows.  

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Just before 10 a.m. the fleet was in sight coming up the Ambrose.

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The YPs 704, 705, 707, and 708 led the fleet in,

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DDG-55 Stout the first larger vessel in,

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followed by DDG-52 Barry and

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foreground vessel is former WPB-82362 Point Brown, now  Lady B

LPD-17 San Antonio.

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Here’s a schedule of events for the public and the fleet this week.

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Enjoy your stay, all.

 

Here’s an index of the series.

Can you place the scene below . . . on the other side of the tracks?   Photos come thanks to Elizabeth Wood who’s on her own gallivant.

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I’ve never been here, but now  . . .  it’s moved way up on my list.

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It’s Grand Canyon State and some sister vessels,

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Cape Orlando,

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and USCGC Waesche.

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For a different shade of gray than the ones above, here’s Matson’s Mahimahi.

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And here’s Ahbra Franco assisting

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Hanjin Buddha.  I can’t identify the tractor alongside the Hanjin ship.

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I see a trip to the Bay area in my future.

Many thanks to Elizabeth for these photos.

Somewhat related:  To see what gray paint bowsprite has recently spilled, click here.

The first four photos come with many thanks to Bonnie frogma, the intrepid “river rat” who’s currently devoting lots of time to preparations for arrival to the sixth boro of Hokule’a.  I know nothing about this particular Lil Toot.

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Bonnie took these photos on Jamaica Bay.  Note the cliffs of Manhattan in the distance.

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Emily I believe is the 1961 built 35-footer.   Bonnie first posted photos of Emily here.

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I took this photo last weekend.  I’ve seen 70′ Wollochet on AIS, but here’s my first view of her crossing sixth boro center stage.

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What this appears like notwithstanding, I think the local boat under 40′ is called Miss Julia.

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Here’s one of the half-century-plus-old WYTLs on the far side of Robbins Reef Light recently, one of the tools the USCG chooses for ice-breaking in the wintery Hudson.  Click here and scroll through to see a WYTL making ice cubes a half decade back.

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Mako III is a 45′ tug the same age as I am.

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Last but certainly not least, Allan Seymour sent this along from the Miami River, and I have no idea about a name or a story.  Anyone help out?

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Many thanks to Bonnie and Allen for some of these photos.   If you’ve wondered about the name frogma, read this.

Unrelated and sad news just passed along by Michele.  Remember this post and this one about goats at the Narrows?  Here was my first contact.

Here’s the sad news.  Here’s the marketing concept.

 

 

The most unambiguous sign of spring is a recreational boat in the sixth boro.

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Margot always ranges widely . . . . but when the Erie Canal is still closed for the season, she’s more frequently in the sixth boro.

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Buchanan 12 is back doing stonework . . .

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big scale.  In winter I’ve not seen this.  Ice preventing it maybe?

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Black-hulled USCG vessels are more common in winter.  I’m not sure what Sanibel (WPB 1312) was doing in town.

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Another indisputable sign of spring .  .  . is that big sliver .  . . in a vulnerable position vis-a-vis the gull.

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All kidding aside, it’s an impressive boat for a guy who immigrated to the US at age 16 and got a job washing dishes . . . if that’s true.    I wonder who’s taking that selfie there?  Is that a selfie with a circle of friends, a huge boat, and a bridge in the background?

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

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Condolences to the family, comfort to the survivors, and

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gratitude to the rescuers.

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Here’s a Newsday account.  And here the NYTimes article.  The photos above I took in 2011 and 2010.

Other photos I’ve taken of Sea Bear can be seen here and here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

You may recall my wondering about a Canal Corp boat I saw last year while I was working on the canal.  Alan Nelson sent the photo below showing the type of vessel while it performed ATON (aids to navigation) service.

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Here’s what Alan wrote:  “It’s a 45’ buoy boat. Designation was “45 BU”. They were built 1957-’62 and in service through the 1980s. Used extensively on inland waters, they were powered by a GM 6-71 main engine and small Onan generator. Max speed approx. 8.5 knots.  Although they had a small galley and berthing area, they weren’t often used for overnight operations, and didn’t have a permanent crew assigned.   They were usually assigned to an ATON team to service small inland buoys and day markers. I ran one on the Delaware River around Philadelphia in the mid-1970s, until we took it up to New York for assignment to Lake Champlain. A slow and long trip, towed by the Coast Guard 65’ Tug Catenary.   The one in the attached photo is numbered 45301-D, the first one built. The one I ran was the 45306-D.”

Below is a further edited photo of the boat I saw.

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And here are some photos by Bob Stopper last month in the dry dock in Lyons.

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Alan and Bob . .  thanks much for your photos and information.

Now if you look closely at the subtitle of this blog, you’ll see a longer phrase there.  It now ends in “gallivants by any and all the crew.”  We are the blog crew . . .  you and me.  I’ve long stated in the “About Tugster” page drop-down just below the header of the Bayonne Bridge that “I like the idea of collaboration and am easy to get along with.”  I am thrilled by the amount of collaboration you all have offered.  So thank and let’s keep group-sourcing this blog together.

 

I wonder what the forgiveness factor for ice-against-hull here is.  Bravest surely was pretty in our maybe soon-to-end Puerto Parcialmente Blanco.

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RB 45605 was the fifth in this series, which is numbered consecutively and now up to 45774.

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Must precautions be taken with these hulls during ice season?

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And finally . . . off the stern of Bering Sea yesterday it’s the current Kings Pointer.  This Kings Pointer started life as a solid rocket booster recovery vessel for NASA.

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Click here for another photo of this vessel in NASA colors.

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And here’s a photo I took back in August 2007 of the previous Kings Pointer, now known as General Rudder and based in Texas.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here was the first in the series five years ago.   Allen Baker took this photo of Thunder Bay last Friday near Newburgh.  Four thousand horsepower can get you nowhere sometimes in conditions like these.  It’s hard for me to believe I may never have posted a photo of WTGB 108 on this blog.

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Foreground . . . Thunder Bay.  Middle . . .  Bannerman Island.  Distance . . . northern section of Hudson Highlands Park.

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Amy C McAllister grunts the Bouchard barge upriver.   For some views of an August day frolic in relatively the same location, click here.   Also for a post comparing summer and winter in this location, click here.

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And looking back at the track through ice left by the tug/barge as they headed for West Point . . . it’s straight and sharp.

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Many thanks to Allen for these photos.  Be safe.

Here were the wild colors that started this series two years ago .. .

and Alice . . . always the trend setter and wanderer . . . seems headed out of the gray days in old New Amsterdam for the tropical colors of new New Amsterdam.  Notice the destination?  That’s the one in Guyana.

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But I digress.  Tropical colors are a treat after some days in the cold achromatic north.  These photos come compliments of the winter refugees aboard Maraki . . . currently in the environs of Curaçao. For more colorful pics of this town, click here.

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Here at the ready are Lima II and a pilot boat, and

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newer sister Damen-built tug Mero.

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Also in port was this International Telecom vessel . . .

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IT Intrepid formerly known as Sir Eric Sharp.

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Given the dominant language of this port, you’d think this local boat would be called “werken meisje ook,”  but surprises never cease.

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or this be called “port service 1.”

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The subject of Dutch-built tugboats in Curaçao resurrects the unsolved mystery of Wamandai, a tug that left Curaçao under some clouds and was possibly sunk by the US Coast Guard.  My letters of inquiry to various Coast Guard offices relevant to this case have turned up not a single answer, not even a word that Wamandai‘s fate is classified.  Should I say it turned up an arrogant silence?    Can anyone weigh in or help out?  Some Dutch navy vets and I would like to know.

Thanks to Maraki for these photos.

For a world of cable layers, click here.

 

I took this photo of what I believe is WPC 1102 Richard Etheridge about three years ago, and I’ve yet to see it or any of the other half-dozen-plus  Sentinel class cutters currently in service because they’re all home-ported around Florida.  So i’m making a request:  if you’re reading this and have a photo of one of these cutters, please share some good ones so that I can post them on this blog?

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They’re all “built on the bayou” so far.

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Like many vessel names, these pay tribute to people although largely unknown should be remembered for remarkable deeds, people like  Webber, Etheridge, Flores, Yered, Norvell, Clark, David (shown below), Sexton, Moore, Evans, and Trump . . . so far.

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The photos above and below I took at the Philadelphia Navy yard a few months ago at a place called Chapel of the Four Chaplains.  If ever you’ve there, just knock on the door and go in and  . . .

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you’ll learn a great story of a sad event from an early February seventy-two years ago.

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Again . . . I’m hoping to see a photo you or someone you know has taken of one of these Sentinel class FRCs.

Photos here all by Will Van Dorp.

 

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