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Here are the previous 70.

I’m very happy to share these photos from Ray Sup, the digital Marketing Specialist/Webmaster at Beyel Brothers.  Megan Beyel came through the sixth boro almost two weeks ago bound for sea.  This is outbound at least her second trip;  the first time she was caught by Tim Hetrick here.

The Indiana-built vessel appears to have a government boat history.  

I was informed she was in Albany port, but I was 200 miles to the west at that time.  I’m not sure, but these appear to have been taken by drone, another

 

piece of evidence that I need to invest.

I’m thankful to Ray for sending these–and more, if you’re interested–along.  As of this posting, Megan Beyel is approaching Miami, where it’s a cloudy 80 degrees.

Thanks to Ray and the Beyel team. See more photos in the series here.

A challenge in documenting your own travel is getting photos of yourself.  On land, you can of course use the time delay feature and position your camera and yourself for a shot.  On the water that’s not so easy.  Drones make those shots available, but drones have not yet been adopted so widely.  I’ve been toying with getting a drone for a while and often wonder when I can’t get the shots possible only with a drone, but I’ve not yet made the purchase of what could take a plunge and be lost.  I know Lake Huron myself as a big lake with not that many safe havens, although I’d love to travel there with a small boat to prove to myself how many interesting havens there might be.

Here’s 36391 in Port Huron, the US port on the north end of the St Clair River, reminding me I’ve got photos for another post from my trip through in September.

Lake St Clair is a great place to encounter traffic, concentrated in the narrow channel through the Lake.  Could that be Oberstar?

And we’re ending this post somewhat abruptly with this shot from Lorain, OH.  Glen and Naomi undertook an ambitious summer voyage, and by the time they got to Lorain, the physical strain was taking a toll;  MLBs were not designed as yachts for long-distance jaunts.  So they made arrangements for winter storage there and hope to continue the voyage from there next summer.

All photos of the feat by Glen and Naomi, who might be heartened by your encouragement.  You can do so either here or on their FB page, which you can find by a FB search for The Point Adams – 36391.

Personally I’d like to offer a Great Lakes-size tip of the hat to Glen and Naomi for restoring the boat, making the trip, documenting it, and agreeing to share their account here.  If they need a support team for part of next summer, I’d step up right now.

More of Glen and Naomi’s journey . . . . These photos

are mostly on Lake Michigan, although St Ignace above and the east side of the Mackinac Bridge are in Lake Huron.   This bridge has the third longest span in the US, and the 20th in the world.

Continuing to stop at USCG stations as well as public docks, the crew brought 36391 into Sturgeon Bay.  Click here (and scroll) for another view of those lighthouses at the east end of the Ship Canal.

Sheboygan was a stop.  Here’s a fish tug photo I took in Sheboygan last year.

Milwaukee.  Note Lake Express disappearing off the upper left side of the photo?

Kenosha and 36391 stand ready, always.

In Wilmette, 36391 had the Bahá’í temple in the background. The temple is so prominent a landmark that I had to visit it upclose last summer.

Here’s one of the best of my photos of the temple.

After that, it’s the unmistakeable Chicago skyline.  That 36391 really got around!

Around the southern corner of the Lake and headed east, it’s Calumet station.

Northbound on the east side of the Lake, MLB 36460, a movie star,  leads the way to the Michigan Maritime Museum.

Glen and Naomi made other stops, but let’s conclude this post in Charlevoix, another spot on my yet-to-visit list.

Many thanks to Glen and Naomi for use of these photos to celebrate this story.  If you do FB, check out  The Point Adams – MLB 36391

Here’s an article about the folks who restored MLB 36460.

 

I first mentioned this boat here, and included photos taken from it on the Columbia River here.

The following story and photos are a real treat. They come from Glen Cathers, whose retirement projects include restoring the 36′ motor lifeboat you see below.  This article from an October 2016 issue of the Dalles Chronicle tells you all about the boat and a bit about Glen.  But let me sketch out a bit more, especially about his sixth boro connections:  his father was a surfman-1936-1940 at Point Adams, where Glen was born.  Glen spent four years in the USCG, 3 on icebreaker Westwind, and one running a 40′ boat in the sixth boro.  After three years piloting commercial hydrofoils and two more on B&O RR tugboats, he then worked on the Staten Island ferry for 28 years, retiring in 1996.

In 2006, Glen and his wife Naomi bought MLB 36391 and began a six-year restoration process.  And what would you do once you have a perfectly restored motor lifeboat?  Take it on the road . . . er, the waters, of course.  And after a few years on the Columbia River system and over the bar and along the Oregon and Washington coasts, navigating waters these boats were designed for and visiting active USCG stations, he put it on a Duluth-bound flatbed in spring 2018.  So if you saw this unit while driving northern highways back in May, here’s some of the rest of the story.

The truck had just pulled into a marina yard in Duluth.

This was Glen and Naomi’s planned itinerary.

Once ready, the 36391 Point Adams points toward the Aerial Lift Bridge to head toward the Duluth Ship Canal, the way into the west end of Lake Superior.

Here Glen, to the extreme right, poses with the boat and some USCG crew at Station North Superior, near Grand Marais.  Look that up on the map here, if you don’t offhand know the location.

From Grand Marais, they head across a glassy and clear Lake Superior to Bayfield, a trip you want to do when you trust you boat, your skills, your health, and have a good weather window. This blog was in Bayfield just a few weeks before 36391 was there.

Here’s the placid lake as they leave from Ontonagon for Houghton-Hancock.

These rails beside the dock–on an island NW of Marquette–were built to accommodate MLBs like this.

Here’s a disused small boat station near Munising,

jumping-off point for Pictured Rocks.

Besides stopping at USCG stations, Glen and Naomi stopped at public docks to show the restoration off to more folks.  Here there’re showing their restored vessel off at the Soo on the best day of the year, Engineers Day, when the locks are open to the public.

I’m grateful to Glen and Naomi for these photos and this story.   This is post one of three.  Two more to come.  If you do FB, search for The Point Adams – 36391, and get ahead of this blog.

Check out this article by my friend Peter Marsh in the October 2017 Northwest Yachting starting on pp. 78-79, with great watercolor illustrations by Cory Mendenhall.

For another article on Glen and 36391, read this one in Spring 2014 issue of Freshwater News by my Peter, starting on p. 13.

I would be remiss if I didn’t say  MLB 36391 is one of only three  (?)  fully restored vessels of the type.  One is 36340, which accompanied 36391 for some time this past summer and is based at the Michigan Maritime Museum.  The other is 36500, a newer boat but famous for the 1952 Pendleton rescue, acclaimed in book and movie entitled The Finest Hours.  There may be others we don’t know about.

I missed the sixth boro fleet week this year, so here’s my compensatory post.

A French FREMM visited the port a few years ago, and here’s the first Italian one I’ve seen, built by Fincantieri.  FREMM . . . well for the French frigate it would expand to Frégate européenne multi-mission.  The Italians would call it Fregata europea multi-missions.”  The acronym for a US version would be MMEF, which seems nomenclature I’d avoid.  As it turns out, the US is considering the design and calling it FFG(X), which can not be pronounced.

The vessel’s name is Alpino.  Almost 10 years ago, I caught another Italian naval vessel, Salvatore Todare, a submarine.

To go from stealth of the Marina Militare to lake and fish science of NOAA–Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, it’s Shenehon,  the same T-boat below taken in Bayfield WI last month and

here, in Muskegon (?) MI in 2008.  Then as now, the 1953 Fort Leavenworth (on the Missouri river) KS vessel works for NOAA.

Let’s have a CCGS 47′ motor lifeboat.  Thunder Cape was built in Kingston ON by Metalcraft.

Question:  How similar are the Canadian CG and US CG designs/perforance?  I photographed these two MLBs in Montauk harbor a few years back.

One of the Park Ranger boats at Apostle Islands National Lakeshore is this RIB by Almar with two 225 hp Hondas.  I haven’t found much about this particular model, between 25′ and 30′.

Burger Boat is a company that manufactured a number of fish tugs;  in 2014 they delivered this research vessel Arcticus, which was going to be called Grayling.  Read this typically astute review by Brian Gauvin.

From Burger now to Burger then, Hack Noyes came off the ways in 1946.  Although originally built for a private fisherman, it has been a government vessel since the early 1950s.

 

For compelling text and photos effectively showing the mission of and activities aboard the boat, click here.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who needs to take a break after this whirlwind tour of government boats of all missions.

 

Recall that “fifth dimension” is my code for the time travel series;  call it history if you wish.

In 1968–50 fast years ago!!–  Mon Lei, which transited the harbor last weekend, was more of a presence.  All photos here come from Steve Munoz, who writes:  “I saw your post and remembered seeing a Chinese junk at the South Seaport in June 1968, and I looked at my pics, which were originally slides. I was on the tug Dalzelleagle (1958 and now McAllister Brothers) with my uncle Bob Munoz, captain and pilot with McAllister. We had some time between jobs so we walked over to the Mon Lei and the people on the boat let us go aboard and inside to take a look. If I remember correctly, the boat was built in Hong Kong around 1895. The interior was beautifully hand-carved mahogany, but very musty smell. You will also see the USCG sail vessel Eagle at seaport pier. I did not know that Mon Lei was still around.”

Another reader of Monday’s post wrote:  ” I boat-sat her for one week in maybe the winter of 87-88. Was bitter cold and she was wintering at the late great Pier 15 [pictured above and below].  Normally she lived at the E 23rd St. marina, but some construction was going on there.  Alan York was traveling on business, so I looked after her. The interior was nothing short of a  fantasy world of Asian carving and ornamentation. One friend described it as a “floating fornicatorium.” Also a nice comfy oil burner for heat. I remember he was scouring the world for new bamboo of a certain kind for her sail battens. Quite the gentleman.”

If you didn’t look at this link previously, see it now for some interior shots.

I’m curious about the two vessels alongside the pier in the lower right.

Continuing here with photos from Steve, below is the future that never was . . . NS Savannah passing Ellis Island (onion domes) bound for sea.  It was June 1968, almost exactly a half century ago for all these photos.

Back when some tugboats had eagles atop their wheelhouses . . . this was Steve’s Uncle Bob at the helm.  A few years ago, I recall seeing one of McAllister’s boats with a plastic dinosaur atop the wheelhouse for a while.  I’ll have to look for the photo.

 

On a different note, here’s a photo by Elizabeth Wood taken in 2005 of Lettie G. Howard along the Brooklynside of the Upper Bay.  Lettie G., built in 1893  (125 years ago, making her as old or even older than Mon Lei, depending on which story you believe.   for all you readers downcast of me, Lettie G. departed the Hudson River around 0700 today, heading for Lake Erie via Gloucester and Nova Scotia.  She is on AIS.  Nelson, Joey, Mac, Jack, Marc, Brenda, Jake, Barry . . . you know who you are.   I hope to see Lettie G. on Lake Erie this summer;  I hope you do too.

 

Thanks to Steve and Elizabeth for use of these photos.

For a history of the Chinese “junk,” click here and here.

Here’s a Hudson down bound set of three posts I did five years ago, in a different season.

This trip starts at Scarano’s just south of Albany, where a crew picked up excursion boat Kingston for delivery to Manhattan.   Last fall after delivery up bound, I posted these landmarks.

Spirit of Albany (1966), operated by the Albany Port District Commission, is a regular for the Waterford Tugboat Roundup parade.

High above Castleton, name going back to Henry Hudson, is that Sacred Heart Church?

Two bridges cross just north of Coeymans are the Berkshire Spur of the NY Thruway and the Alfred H. Smith Memorial Bridge, the furthest south operational rail bridge over the Hudson.

Katherine Walker performs spring buoy planting south of Coxsackie.

I’ve heard a story behind the “parked” marine equipment in Athens NY, but need a refresher.  Anyone explain how this came to be frozen in time here?  The view is only possible if your draft allows you to navigate the channel on the west side of Middle Ground Flats.

Hudson-Athens Light is one of the lighthouses saved from demolition at a point when all lights were being automated.  Back when I did more hiking, I looked down on the Hudson and some of these landmarks from the heights, in “what Rip saw,” as in the long sleeper.

South of Catskill Creek, you can see snow still covering the slopes of the Catskills.

Marion Moran pushes Bridgeport upbound.  That’s the east shore of the Hudson beyond her.

By the time we get to Saugerties, snow seems to be creating whiteout conditions on the Catskill escarpement.

We head south, here meeting Fells Point pushing Doubleskin 302.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  For more on the lighthouses, click here. In the next in the series, we head farther south.

And for what it’s worth, I’m still in the market for some “seats” photos.

 

For context in this series, IS2 is most explicit, but for fun, check them all here.  The photos in this series, all scans of slides,  were all taken after the late 1950s.

#1.  This is called Hudson raft-up.  My questions:  Can anyone identify the tug or at least its company?  Is that a steam crane on the nearest barge?

#2.  Lightship Scotland.  Click here for a great story about bypassing the fishing regulations in the vicinity of the Scotland light, named for a 19th century wreck at that location.   Some questions:  Is that the current Ambrose at South Street Seaport?   Which lighthouse/lightship tender would that have been in the New York Bight?  What might the smaller USCG vessel be?

#3.  USS Saratoga CV-60, launched NY Naval Shipyard in spring 1956, i.e., she was fairly new when this photo was taken. Only two more carriers would be built at New York Naval Shipyard in Brooklyn.  After service until 1994, she was decommissioned and plans were made to transform her into a museum, but those plans collapsed and she has been sent to scrap.   For photos by Birk Thomas of CV-60 departing for the scrapping, click here.

Many thanks to Ingrid Staats for allowing me to publish these photos here, where I hope group sourcing brings more info to light.

 

ENDS THIS AFTERNOON . . .  I had planned something else for today, but this auction ends in just a few hours.  Impulse buy anyone?

taken October 2010 at Mystic Seaport

As of this morning, high bid is just under $10,000.  Some details here:  “1962 Gibbs Corp. Growler Harbor and icebreaking tug. HIN: WYTL-65606; Length: 64~11″; Beam: 19~1″; Draft: 9~; Builder: Gibbs Corporation, Jacksonville, FL; Machinery: 3,690 mile range; Electronics: SPN-11 detection radar. Vessel is listed in salvage condition. Vessel is not taking on water.”

taken September 2011 at Sixth Boro’s tugboat race

Photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s NOT bidding.  For a previous Growler post with links, click here.   For another WYTL breaking ice on the Hudson a few years back, click here.

Back to Ingrid’s photos tomorrow.

George sent me these photos months ago, and I apologize for leaving them in storage for so long. But since I have a lull in traveling, these photos need to come out now, starting with Deschenes, about which I’ll have more to say at the end of this post.  This photo was taken in the interestingly named town of De Tour Village, MI, a place definitely on my list for a summer trip.

As I reconstruct George’s journey, which started and ended the same day in Sault Ste Marie MI, he drove close to 500 miles to get these photos.  I’ve rearranged the order.  This fish tug on the Garden Peninsula appears to be called Morning Star, although likely in earlier days it had a different name.  I skipped this peninsula on my trip last summer.

Farther east and south, he shot Siscowet (1946) over the fence.  As of some time ago, the Burger Boat vessel was still not scrapped.

Lake Explorer, built 1963 as a USCG 82′ cutter, is now retired from the Minnesota Sea Grant program. No doubt, the vessel below has shifted some of its work to Lake Guardian, which I caught here entering Milwaukee harbor.

Krystal started life as 45′ ST 2168, later USACE Thunder Bay, launched by Roamer Boat in 1953. Some Roamer STs previously posted on this blog can be located here.

LARCs . . . here’s one.

This tug yacht . . .  George had no clues about.  Anyone?

Linda Jean, built in Green Bay in 1950, spent a quarter century as a fish tug before transformation into a pilot boat, a role she continues–I believe–to serve. I’ve long been intrigued by fish tugs.    In the distance, that’s Drummond Islander IV, 148′ x 43′ with 32-car capacity, since 2000 providing year-round service to  . . . Drummond Island.  Click here for the great shots of her “walking” over the ice on a -15 degrees F morning.  How can drones even work in that?

If there were plans to scuttle this Chicago River icebreaker fireboat as a dive site over a decade ago, well, only skydivers could descend on her in her location as of some months back.  It’s Fireboat Engine No. 37 aka Joseph Medill, launched in 1949 and retired in 1936 1986.

My reason for starting out with George’s photo of Deschenes is that she is for sale.  Here’s a photo of the boat in 2003.

Here she is out of the water at Passage Boat Works in De Tour, MI, and

and here’s the paperwork.  If interested, here’s more:  asking price is $22,000.00 and contact is Les Thornton at les.d.thornton@gmail.com

Thanks to George and Les for use of these photos.

And happy thanksgiving, today and every day.

Unrelated:  Enjoy this slide show of the work leading up to the opening on the VZ Bridge 53 years ago today, and below, that’s Sarah D outbound under the VZ near midsummer earlier this year at 0530  . . .

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