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It’s been a few months since I last used this title here . . .

USNS Gilliland has been alongside the Bayonne dry dock for a few weeks now, and the other day

I had the chance to see her alongside a bit closer.

This Danish hull has been in the water most of the time since 1972.

MLB 47279, based in Montauk, is a whole different type of government boat.

This source says 117 of these were built, introduced between 1997 and 2003, and

all remain in service.  To see these boats in action, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

In case you’re wondering which vessel(s) will be where, here’s the navy.mil listing.  These photos are ordered in the sequence they passed lower Manhattan.

USCGC Hamilton WMSL-753,less than three years old, is home-ported in Charleston  . . . and Seattle.   How does that work?

 

RV Neil Armstrong AGOR-27 replaced the venerable RV Knorr, mentioned here once some years back.

USS Kearsarge LHD 3, named for a mountain I climbed decades ago, is the fourth in a line of vessels named for the US warship commanded by John A. Winslow that sank Confederate raider CSS Alabama, two of whose crew were Raphael Semmes and Irving S. Bulloch,  off Cherbourg France in June 1864, less than a year before the end of the devastating US Civil War.  This account of the Battle of Cherbourg is worth a read.

 

Our friends to the North always have a representation, and HMCS Glace Bay MM 701 is this year’s.

Glace Bay‘s classmate Moncton appeared on this blog back in 2012 here.

Four YPs are in town from Annapolis. Here are some YP photos from two years ago, different perspective.

Here’s YP 705.

 

And finally USNS Yuma T-EPF-8 is without a doubt the newest vessel in this procession, having been accepted earlier in 2017.

I wonder who the photographer in the yellow foulies is.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will be wandering around town trying to get more closeups these next few days.  And below is another shot of USS Kearsarge.

Here are the posts I did each of the past two years.  I’ll call this the beginning of the processional.  How many government vessels do you count in the photo below?

Carefully screened support vessels--Rana Miller, Elizabeth McAllister, and Resolute— lead the procession, here past Ellis Island,

while small craft of the NYC Navy and Air Force and others patrol.

Other McAllister boats include Alex McAllister . . . and

Eric.

CG-56 USS San Jacinto leads the larger vessel contingent.  She was here as well in 2012.   Know the import of that location in April 1836?  

Tomorrow will feature close-ups of the rest of the fleet, but for now we’ll leave it here.

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who counts eight government craft in the first photo.  Here’s a post-fleet week photo set from 2009.

 

The little-used adjective fleet is appropriate here.   And when something goes amiss in the diverse workplaces of the sixth boro, it’s great to have the fleetest responders there are. The amusement park on the beach in the background identifies the location as Coney Island.  In fact, the responders towed the vessel out to deeper water while dewatering.  No passengers were on board at the time of the emergency, water ingress portside engine room.  All’s well that end’s well.

MV Belinsky worked in San Francisco waters from at least 2007 until last summer. I’m guessing it arrived in the harbor aboard a ship . . .

Many thanks to New York Media Boat for photo and information. And hat’s off to the responders from USCG, FDNY, and NYPD.

Here are previous fleetest posts.

 

I’m told this vessel from bottom of keel to mast tops measures more than 8 feet.  Can you identify its location?  Here’s some more info:  “Marcus T. Reynolds designed the weathervane atop the center tower, a 400 pound replica of the Half Moon, which is 6 feet, 9 inches long and 8 feet, 10 inches tall, and the largest working weathervane in the US.”

The photo above was take in March, and the one below  . . . in February 2017.

It spins with the winds incessantly atop this building and will never make it to the major river less than a quarter mile beyond.  Know it?  It was built for a railroad and now it’s a university administration building.

Here’s a photo I took in September 2012 from the Hudson side.  The weather vane looks like a mere speck.  It’s less than a mile from the northern end of the Port of Albany oil docks.

And here’s the answer.  The source of the quote is here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has done many previous Half Moon posts here.

 

Hats off to the small boats that work all year round . . . crew boats,

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patrol boats,

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fishing boats,

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line boats,

pilot boats,

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dive boats,

more fishing boats,

more crew boats,

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government boats,

more —soon to face major cuts--government boats

more line and boom boats,

and here’s a special . . . a historic life boat, long atop Binghamton, which is still intact as far as I know, and a bit longer ago had

guys in hazmat suits doing the last ever lifeboat drill aboard the 112-year-old condemned ferry.

And finally, of course there’s the New York Media Boat. 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who gives a hat tip to all the crews in small boats on the big waters.

 

Let me start to play catch up here, since I have not done one of these posts in over half a year.  Anyone know why HMCS St. John’s (FHH-340) steamed into the sixth boro yesterday, Thanksgiving Day?  To assist this 45′ USCG response vessel and all the land-based law enforcement in keeping order on the so-called “black friday” chaos, perhaps?

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USNS GySgt. Fred W. Stockham (T-AK-3017) was waiting in the anchorage,possibly for a berth at GMD Bayonne. The vessel namesake had an interesting set of deployments.

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Icebreaker Penobscot Bay (WTGB-107) headed upriver a half month ago, but there was no imminent ice formation at that time, unless one traveled  well north of Inukjuak, but it would take some extraordinary turn-of-events for WTGB-107 to deploy there.

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The sixth boro has a number of these 29′ patrol craft.

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And to close out today’s post, USACE Moritz passes the evolving Rockefeller University campus expansion just north of the Queensboro Bridge.

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All photos in the past month by Will Van Dorp.

 

Over six years ago, I posted with a title this one mimics.  Richard Dixon is to the left, clearly USCG white, indicating its primary mission.  My question is what color is the larger vessel to the right?

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Maybe you can guess more about this vessel below.  The photo comes from a secret salt from a small Caribbean port I will also leave nameless.

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So the unidentified patrol vessel is the P-840 Holland, 355′ offshore patrol vessel for the Royal Netherlands Navy.   The design is intended to minimize radar visibility, but the color is also a blue gray said to camouflage it on the horizon better than gray.

Contrasting with that blue, check out the gray of LHD 7, USS Iwo Jima, which arrived in the sixth boro a few days ago in honor of Veterans Day.

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Top three photos come thanks to Capt. Nemo.  The fourth was taken by Will Van Dorp.

For more gray, click here.

 

 

Who else greeted Wavertree on the rest of the way home?  John J. Harvey is always in on celebrations.

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Lettie G. Howard was there,

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as was the helicopter.  Feehan presented herself on the far side of Rae.

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Pioneer accounted for

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herself with crew in the crosstrees.

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Pioneer and Lettie teamed up at times.

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Wire showed up.

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New York Harbor School had two boats there, including Privateer and their

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newest vessel Virginia Maitland Sachs, about which I’ll post soon.

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Melvillian throngs came down to the “extremest limit of land” on Pier 15 and 16, for one reason or another, but who were about to be treated to some excellent ship handling.

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Rae took the lead, showing the need for tugboats of all sizes.

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The larger tugs pushed and pulled as needed to ease into the slip

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until all lines were fast and

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and the shoreside work needed doing.

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Bravo to all involved.  If you want to take part in a toast to Wavertree, you can buy tickets here for the September 29 evening.

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If you haven’t read the NYTimes article by James Barron yet, click here.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes I left no one out and who as before is grateful to the South Street Seaport Museum and the photographers’ boat provided by US Merchant Marine Academy and crewed by a set of dedicated cadets.

Often folks ask how one can learn about the harbor or is there a book about the sixth boro.  Volunteering at South Street Seaport Museum is a great way available to all to get access to the water, to learn from like-minded folks, and to start on a journey of reading the harbor and its traffic for yourself.  Each volunteer’s journey will be unique, and willing hands make institutions like this museum survive and thrive.

I’ve written about summertime and about summertime blues–about beating them.  But since you can’t ever step into the same river twice, or gallivant in the same primordial first boro, here’s the 2016 version of trying to capture the sixth boro with a camera on a hot summer weekend afternoon, looking for shade–any shade will do– as much as looking for novel compositions.

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These days odd juxtapositions can be found on west Manhattan piers and

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beyond, like Eagle and the fast bird and Loveland Island with a pilot on board and some folks gathered on the starboard bridge wing .  For a post I did last year with close-ups of details of USCGC Eagle AND for a book I highly recommend reading about her appropriate by the US post-WW2, click here.  Speaking of piers, here’s an interesting article on the engineering and construction of Pier 57.

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Or come for a tour on Janet D Cruises . . .

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with four sails set.

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Long Beach comes to Bayonne along with a Celebrity ship and a PWC . . . pesky workless canoe?

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Flagship Ivy clings for a spell to the bottom over by the VZ Bridge.

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Margaret Moran heads for the next job–or the yard, with Queens’ current and future tallest buildings in the background,

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while YP 704 sails past Governors Island, which has sprouted some new hillocks frequented by lots of people.

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Joan Turecamo exits the Buttermilk west with a light (?) dry bulk barge Montville, which probably recently carried coal.

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All photos Sunday by Will Van Dorp.  for some contrast, see this winter set and this.   More of the summer selects, tomorrow.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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