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I’ve been waiting to get a good photo of the latest FDNY vessel under way and I caught it here the other day.

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Her top speed exceeds 40 knots, an important feature given the need to urgently respond to a crisis.

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Another relatively new government boat in the harbor is NYPD 621, P. O. Harry R. Ryman.  

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Of course, RIBs like 25713 are always out and training.

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And finally, I’m guessing this is a government boat, given where it was, but it has no marking on it at all.  Anyone help?

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

First, my take on the identification of the tug from the film in yesterday’s post, it’s a model and filmed in New Deal Studios in LA.    That would explain the logistics.

So, for today, let’s start with Miss Katie . . . outbound last Thursday.

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Miss Katie, 1998

 

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Mister T, 2001

 

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Ruth M. Reinauer, 2008, pushing RTC 102

 

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Discovery Coast, 2012

 

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Kirby Moran, 2015, assisting STI Fulham

 

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JRT Moran, 2015

 

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McAllister Girls, 1968, moving B. No. 231

 

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Amy C McAllister, 1975, also assisting B. No. 231

 

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Brian Nicholas, 1966.   Sturgeon Bay, 1987

 

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Eric McAllister, 2014, passing NYK Nebula

 

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Irish Sea, 1969

 

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James D. Moran, 2015, assisting NYK Nebula

And finally, we return to Miss Katie because two days later, she caught some unwanted attention.  Details here.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Technically the first vessel I saw–before dawn– in 2016 was Hudson River-built Jean Turecamo and then Surrie Moran, as they headed south to assist this outbound tanker, Kingcraft, which seems to be barely off the ways.

And once I spotted such a bright clean LNG vessel headed my way, my noirish self dissipates;  call me Marinus de Blauw.     Tugboat Jean Turecamo is off the starboard bow, whereas Surrie is invisible at the stern.   Parading behind are USCGC WPB 87361 Sea Horse and Vane’s Chatham.

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As it turned out, Kingcraft still had its USCG escort as it continued out the Thimble Shoals Channel of the CBBT, Morocco bound.

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From Island 1, to the north I could see a tug and barge headed southbound through the Chesapeake Channel between Island 3 and 4.

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It turned out to be Sea Robin towing  . . .

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Sugar Express . . . Florida bound, I presume.   Here’s more info on Sea Robin.

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And I include this next set as a jog-memory for myself:  at the Route 13 scenic area pull-off  in southern Kiptopeke, a look past the weirs I got a glimpse of a future destination . . .

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the concrete ships of the breakwater.

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I have to allow enough time to see them closer next time.

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More on the first twelve hours of 2016 tomorrow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Marginally related . . . concrete barges also languish on the Erie Canal.

Directly related . . . some previous posts featuring the Hampton Roads area are here, herehere, and here.

Differently marginally related:  Kingcraft–whatta name!!–is a new vessel;  Horizon Trader, seen in this sixth boro post from less than two years ago, is about to beach for the scrappers in India.

Many thanks to Glen for this photo of his restored 1934 below.  His words:  “Naomi and I on our 1934 retired, fully restored USCG motor lifeboat up on the Snake River (a tributary of the Columbia) last spring. We did 14 dam lock thrus in 14 days! Have a great Holiday Season from Glen and Naomi out here in Washington State.”

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Here was a post I did two years ago on a 1929 Type T motor lifeboat, slightly shorter and narrower.  Scroll through here and you’ll see a photo of a Type-T operating in NY’s sixth boro.

Click here for a recent post that used Glen’s photos.

 

I’ve a friend in the NJ town who pronounces her place of residence as if it started “H O B U . . . .”  The NJ city has a population density of 39,2012 people per square mile.  Many of them came down to the water in July 2014 for the City of Water Day, when I took these photos.

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Anyone know the vintage of this small yard tug?

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Many notable people are associated with Hoboken, but my association is with my parents, who both first set foot in the USA in Hoboken on the Holland-America pier, now long gone.

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As weird fate would have it, they traveled immediately to North Carolina, where their sponsor lived, which –as the seagulls fly–is about 30 miles from Hobucken, NC, where this USCG station is located.

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I don’t know if my parents ever visited Hobucken.  There’s the fish fleet just past the Route 304 bridge.

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I’d love to stop by the town someday soon.

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By the way, it has a population density of 25 people per square mile.

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Two Boys intrigued me, a 1966 44′ retired USCG boat.

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Anyone know if there’s a connection between the two place names?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

This post is a direct follow-up to one I did a week ago, documenting the 270-nm trip from Kings Point NY to Norfolk aboard USMMA Sailing Foundation vessel Tortuga.  This post documents the second and final leg of the trip to Tortuga‘s winter berth in New Bern NC, a 179-nm trip from Norfolk.

Let’s start here.  Departure time on day 1 is 1100 h. If you think the navy vessel in dry dock looks familiar, well . . . it visited the sixth boro in May 2012, and I toured the ship DDG 57 USS Mitscher at that time here.

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A USN presence is pervasive along the Elizabeth river portion of the ICW, but the Norfolk Naval Ship is

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technically in Portsmouth. The vessel above is AS 41 USS McKee

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Click here and here for info on the Elizabeth River, technically a tidal estuary.  Click on the map below to get interactivity.

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Here McLean Contracting Co. tug Fort Macon works on the replacement of the Steel Bridge in Chesapeake VA.

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I was surprised to learn there’s a lock in the ICW, the Great Bridge Lock.  I was even more surprised to learn the USACE contracts the operation and maintenance of the lock to a company called US Facilities.

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I must read more about the ICW, but in WW2 it proved a safe route for commerce when enemy submarines preyed on vessels offshore.

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Paradise Creek pushes oil along the ICW today; when I started this blog,  it was a regular workhorse in the sixth boro of NYC.

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The color of ICW water is determined by natural tannins.

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The ICW is composed of wide open bays and sounds–which have narrow channels-as well as narrow cuts.   Here Evelyn Doris of the ICM fleet pushes a covered barge–soybeans, I’ll wager–northbound, possibly to Norfolk.

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Ahead is the US Rte 64 Bridge over the Alligator River, a swing bridge.

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Note the proximity of the photo above to the Atlantic Ocean.

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Tannins in the Alligator River water create this color.

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North Carolina today protects a lot of its coastal wetlands. Hunting is permitted, and in fact, VHF radio picked up a lot of communication with folks hunting in there.

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Parts of the ICW flow through cuts like the Alligator-Pungo Canal.

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This moment of arrival in Belhaven meant a lot to me, because just around the point in the center of the photo is the hospital where I was born. I hadn’t known it, but Belhaven also considers itself the birthplace of the ICW.

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Departure time on day 3 was 0600, Jupiter and Venus were higher in the sky than the rising sun.

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Aurora Mine looms over the Pamlico river. Potash export happens through Beaufort,  documented on tugster here and here a few years back.

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See the mine area on the south side of the Pamlico River below.

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Hunting abounds here.

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Note the spelling. 

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Belhaven used to support a fishing fleet.  I’ve no idea how the size of the fleet and market in Hobucken has fluctuated over the years.

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Day 3, early afternoon we depart the Neuse River for the Trent by passing through the Cunningham Drawbridge.

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Tortuga is docked here for winter.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Again many thanks to the USMMA Sailing Foundation for inviting me to crew in winter relocation for Tortuga.

Here was part 1.  Thanks much for the comments.  My conclusion is that most but not all were taken at the 1986 centennial celebration of our lady of the harbor.    I am still seeking a photo of the canal tug Grand Erie, ex-USACE Chartiers, launched in 1951, at the event.

Barque Simón Bolívar it would be good to see her back in the sixth boro again.  At this point, she was less than a decade old.   This past summer, she called in various ports in the Caribbean.

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Any help here anyone?

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USS Iowa BB-61 served as the reviewing stand for the event.  Click here for scans of the day and here for video.  Can anyone identify the tug alongside the battleship starting at about 2:10?

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Barque Eagle of course.  Can anyone identify the tugs in this photo?

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It’s schooner Pioneer in the background.

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The red-hulled vessel at the foot of the tower .  . is that stick lighter Ollie, now rotting away in VerPlanck?  See the end of this post.   Anyone know the USCG tug?

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These look like the morning-after spent fireworks shells.  What did it say in front of “industry” here?  And here ends the photos supplied by Harry Thompson.

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And here, as a note that I should do a post soon about Ollie . . . is one of the photos I took of her in 2010.  I saw her earlier in 2015, and it’ was even sadder by five years than this one.  Anyone have good pics of Ollie in her day?

Thanks very much, Harry, for getting this show going.

How about cold pics today, like these first two of Line.   For the story, click here, an article that never got paper published.

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What floats in the Hudson here is like what floats in my tea all day.   I recall that the crew I interviewed here told me I should try to see one of these in dry dock to understand how the design of the hull makes these small tugs great for breaking ice.  “It has an ice pick,” one person said.

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Well, finally I got to see Swivel high and dry.  Swivel is no longer owned by the USCG.  It may belong to an entity called GIPEC.

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Anyhow, this is about WYTL design.  See the ice pick?  The bow rides up on the ice and the perpendicular notch saws through.

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I’m glad I finally got to see this, and I hope you too are chilled by thinking of icebreakers and the beautiful season shaping us a half year from now.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

There’ve been plenty of people I’ve wanted to chance re-encounter, but it doesn’t always happen.  I’ve been to Southwest Harbor long ago, but I’ve never seen a Good Idea before.

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I saw this WLB come into the harbor the other day and just assumed it was Katherine Walker, WLM-552.  But I was wrong.  Voila Elm, WLB-204, 50 feet longer than Walker, and  out of Atlantic Beach, NC, where I saw it a few years back.

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Alice Oldendorff . . . I heard her crew talking with the Sandy Hook pilots the other day . . . .  I wish I knew how many voyages she has made into the sixth boro in the past decade!!

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The Blue Peter . . . I saw it a month ago in Narragansett Bay, but got close enough for a good photo only after they’d dropped sail.

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Liberty II . . . our paths haven’t crossed in quite a while.

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Sea Lion . . . is a busy boat.

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New York Media Boat . . .  another busy boat in duplicate.

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No Wake . . . our paths have never crossed that I recollect, but I wonder whose she has.  She seems to have some age.

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All photos taken in the past week or so . . .

Let me share photos from three Eagle visits in the past decade.  Here she arrives off the east end of Wall Street.

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2005, I believe.

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Note the teams hauling on the docking line.

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docking at then Pier 17

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Charles D. McAllister tucks her in to the dock.

Here she lies at anchor in 2011 with

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crew in the rigging doing

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work.

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departure 2011

And here are details I focused on earlier this week.

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To reiterate what I wrote yesterday,read Captain Gordon McGowan’s The Skipper and the Eagle.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

For a similar set of closeups of another German-built sail training vessel–Dewaruci–click here.

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Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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