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I’m just observing, not criticizing, but the vessel turnout in 2022 seems quite small. I understand that lots of other things are happening globally.   Following USS Bataan, USCGC Sycamore (WLB-209) and HMS Protector (A-173) arrive.  They are both about 20 years in service and have both done assignments in the Arctic.

Sycamore made a run up to the GW before turning around. I saw her here in the sixth boro just over a year ago.

Protector did not begin life as a UK Royal Navy ice patrol vessel.  Rather, it was built as the 2001 Polarbjørn in Lithuania for GC Rieber, a Norwegian company based in Bergen, a port I visited way back in 1985, on one of my early gallivants.  Unfortunately, in those days I traveled sans camera.

 

 

USCGC Dependable (WMEC-626) built at AmShip in Lorain OH and commissioned in 1968,  is over the midcentury mark and still at work.  AmShip Lorain-closed since the early 1980s-  built some icons, several of their lakers still very much in active service.

 

Most of the medium endurance cutters of Dependable‘s cohort-Reliance class– are still in service, either in the US or elsewhere.

 

 

USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) was commissioned in 2015.   Like Sycamore and Dependable, she was built on the Great Lakes

Four years ago here, I visited the Marinette Shipyard town where Milwaukee came into existence. Some products of Marinette include Sycamore–above–and Ellen McAllister, also involved in Wednesday’s parade into the sixth boro. Katherine Walker, part of the welcoming committee Wednesday, is another Marinette product, as are some of the current Staten island ferries (Molinari class) and some ATBs, like Brandywine and Christiana that pass through the port now and then.

 

As Milwaukee steamed upriver, she slowed and spun a 180 turn much faster than I imagined possible for a 378′ vessel.   I wish I’d been on shore just off her improvised turning basin when she did so. Was anyone there and can send photos?

A sister of Milwaukee, USS Duluth (LCS 21) was commissioned in her namesake city only earlier this week.

All photos, WVD, who hopes to get in some more Fleet Week sights this weekend.  If you’re reading this and arrived in the sixth boro–aka the primary boro–of NYC, welcome. 

 

 

Not quite half a year ago, I used a variation on this title, but photos I took yesterday necessitate a modification as you see above. 

Imagine my surprise when I saw this nameplate on the most famous–and only–wooden hulled tugboat in the sixth boro.

I’d noticed before on AIS that there was USCG vessel in North Cove, but I never imagined this would be it.  In the background, Mariner III adds an allusion to another time period.

Now does that look like contemporary font the USCG would use?!!  I don’t think so.

And the stack marking and registration board “New York Harbor Patrol” no longer say what it used to . . .  might this be some leasing arrangement.  But hey . . . this is NYC, a movie-making-magnet metropolis, and this just smacks of a made-for-movies-makeover!  Remember this one?  Find a lot more film tugs previously on tugster here.

As to the other part of the title check this out . . .   the name of the barge B. No. 280 follows the Bouchard nomenclature pattern.

Of course, I never imagined Bouchard boats in anything other than their original livery . . .

For now at least the name is the same;  in fact, the name board appears not even to have been refinished.

The stack is unadorned white.

And “Portland OR”  registration on the starboard stern corner of the barge and

on the tug.  Maybe some lion motifs are forthcoming?

All photos, WVD.

 

I’ve used this title a dozen times before, but never have four relatively recent hulls shared sixth boro waters until now, at least not that I’m aware of.

So let’s start here with an obvious logo and a name I couldn’t quite parse, Viking

Octantis, until I realized it was named for a star visible in the Southern Hemisphere. 

From here, they head north and are expected on the Saint Lawrence by the end of April.  This is the vessel that is supposed to transform cruising in the Great Lakes, including Lake Superior, using Milwaukee as its hub for the summer months.  I can say from experience that Milwaukee could be a great city for this. Here, here and here are more Milwaukee posts previously on tugster.

I understand that Blount tried Lake Superior with their vessels years ago, but Viking will bring in a few hundred guests at a time.  Other itineraries explain the name, as they will sail under the southern skies.  As of this writing this 2022 vessel is still at the passenger terminal, unfortunately, stern to land, and I wanted to see the bow. She was delivered from the VARD Shipyard in Søvik NO in January 2022.

As of 1130 today, she  headed for sea, for Charlottetown PEI, specifically.

Another 2022 vessel arrived in the sixth boro yesterday, USCGC Clarence Sutphin WPC-1147, the 47th Sentinel-class cutter has delivered to the USCG.  After christening, WPC-1147 will head off to Bahrain.

Christening is here most likely because the namesake was a Queens native.  I thought that learning this would help me understand the origin of this major street near where I live, but it seems both street and hero  have names traced back to the old country.  The new cutter overtook the container ship under the VZ Bridge.

While we’re looking at hulls delivered in 2022, here’s another, with noticeable style-cousins already working in the boro.  I’ll let you look for the similarities in superstructure.  James K was recently delivered to Weeks, as reported here

She’s been hauling dredge scows the past few days, as was the case Easter morning at first light.

 

See the resemblance certainly with James E. Brown?  Rodriguez Boatbuilders needs their history site updated.

Another fairly new hull in town, possibly calling in PoNYNJ for the first time is CMA CGM Osiris.  I’ve not yet seen it, but she may depart today.

All photos, WVD.

 

The sixth boro has lots of government boats . . .  aka taxpayers’ boats, like the 29 Defiant

This RB-M appears to be training a large crew.

This BUSL is headed out for some ATON work.

Besides the many federal boats, NYC has its own fleet including three GUP carriers of this latest class.  This is a front light Rockaway.

One of two large fireboats, 343 here is at her base beside Little Island, aka Diller Island.

USACE in the boro has some small survey boats.

Sturgeon Bay holds station at the star. 

And to close out . . .  here’s that same 29 Defiant executing a tight turn in the ferry wake. 

All photos, WVD, who’s still on the road. 

I have to go back over 14 years to find the previous appearance of Tybee on this blog.  Is she still based in Woods Hole?  Has she been here and I just missed it?  I can’t say.  I would say she rolls . . .

The groupbrain internet says she’s still based in Woods Hole, all except earlier this week. 

 

SSG Michael H. Ollis continues her training runs in the Upper Bay.  I’m eager to catch my first ride aboard her.

At least when her sisters show up, crews will be trained, having done their orientations aka Familiarization 101 aboard Ollis. Anyone know ETA of next of the class?

And finally, I was thrilled to catch Susan Miller and Gabby escorting retired FDNY Alfred E. Smith to another berth.  I forgot to follow up, so I don’t know where Smith is currently located.  Anyone help?

I was fortunate to catch her with backgrounds Pier A and

the Colgate Clock. 

All photos, WVD.

Unrelated:  I’m planning a post on the 1946 Matton-built tugboat that carried the following names:  Margaret Matton, Fort Lauderdale, Evening Light, Hudson, and Chyanne Rose.  As Hudson, she worked for Reinauer/BTT from 1978 until 2005.  She came up recently in a conversation about running oil up the Passaic as far as Wallington, and I’d love to collect stories.  Please help out with stories and photos if you can.

 

I believe this is the first time I post a photo of 1961 FDNY Alfred E. Smith.  She was sold to private owners in 2016. 

Nearer the mainland on Pier 25, Lilac has held this berth since 2011.

USACE Gelberman has been a regular here, as has 

Dobrin.

USACE Driftmaster has worked collecting debris since 1949!  I wonder how plans to replace her are coming along. 

I could not identify this heavily-laden sludge  . . . I mean GUP . . . carrier. 

NYPD’s Cardillo and 

Hansen are two boats of the Harbor Unit, itself a part of NYPD since 1858.  Hansen has been in service since 1994. 

Soderman is the current occupant at Bayonne Drydock & Repair.

Oops!  It’s Alice and OllisAlice Austen usually runs in the wee hours, and Ollis arrived in the boro back in August and will enter service as soon as training is complete. 

x

All photos, WVD.

 

Four years ago, I saw Alder in Duluth, where she had worked since her launch in Lake Michigan in 2004.  Believe it or not, I appear NOT to have taken photos of her, as unlikely as that seems.   In 2005, Alder replaced the 1944 Sundew, which is still in Duluth, now as a private vessel.  I was in Duluth after an interesting ride up from Milwaukee, but I appear not to have been in a mood to take photos of USCG vessels.

Alder is no longer in Duluth;  earlier this month she traveled out of the Great Lakes.  Jack Ronalds got these photos from Strait of Canso.  Here she arrives from the north and heads for the lock, which is Seawaymax size.  The pilot boat Strait Falcon makes the pilot exchange. 

 

USCG in foreign territory . . .  Click here for the other Juniper-class cutters, of which Alder is the last.

Here‘s a story about one of the pilots in the Strait area.

Getting back to Alder, might this be a tad hubristic?

From here, Alder headed to Baltimore by way of Boston.  I’d held off posting this because I though she might pass through the sixth boro, but . . .  I’ve read that after rehabbing, she heads to new duty in Hawaii.  I wonder who’s replacing her in Duluth.

Many thanks to Jack for use of these photos, and for seeing an eye on the Strait. 

Off New London USCGC Coho and a 45′ response boat take part in training off Race Rock Light and then later off

Little Gull Island Light, with the 87′ towing the 45′ boats.

A regular in the sixth boro is USCGC Beluga.

The 29′ patrol boats monitor lots of activities in the harbor;  here they board a small fishing boat.

Of the many USCG aids-to-navigation (AToN) boats, this is 49′ BUSL.

Small USACE survey boats seem constantly at work in the harbor.

NYC DEP has a monitoring boat, Sandpiper.  Another one of their boats is called Osprey.

Another DEP vessel, this one is called Oyster Catcher.

NYPD has its own navy;  here is one of their bigger boats, the 55′ Det. Luis Lopez.

Here’s another NYPD patrol boat, drawled dwarfed by a ULCV bow wave.  [I like that new word “drawled,” sort of like swamped but not quite maybe.]

One of the four carriers (yes, they carry, and for which the demand never stops) of the DEP fleet is Rockaway.

Any guesses on this speedy black vessel?

It’s a marine unit of the same folks you might be talking to if you’re speedy on roads inland.

All photos, recently, WVD.

 

 

 

Grey Shark assisted out of the Kills by Catherine C.  MillerCatherine is still working, but Grey Shark has not moved from its berth in Las Caleras DR in almost three and a half years, so it’s safe to assume she won’t be calling in NYC’s sixth boro any more. By the way, July 2011 had some HAZY summer days.

The former Kristin Poling (1934 as Poughkeepsie Socony) had a few months to work, here alongside the almost new Crystal Cutler.

The mighty Viking was still working.  See the Celebrity ship in the haze.

along with even more powerful fleetmate Irish Sea, still intact and tied up at Vinik Marine.

Glen Cove was still working;  she was sold south.

Then the gallivanting started, here with a stop under the Route 213 bridge alongside the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal to watch the almost-new Mako go by. 

Down to Key West and USCGC Mohawk WPG-78, now a fish condo.  She was reefed almost exactly a year later.

Florida is unusual in that few Kirby tugboats, to my knowledge, work as assist boat.  She’s currently operated as a Seabulk tug.

C-Tractor 5 and its fleetmate

the slightly more powerful lucky 13 set the bar for unusual design and color scheme.

All photos, WVD, who’s making arrangements for more gallivanting soon, although it looks to be in the interior on the continent rather than along the edges.

If you’ve not seen a ULCV, CMA CGM A. Lincoln is coming in this afternoon/evening.

 

Brazos is in the sixth boro;  I caught her at the east end of Fire Island a few months back here.

R/V Shearwater approached, but that’s likely just because Shearwater appears to survey every square millimeter of the sixth boro and beyond.

A day later I approached Brazos between the raindrops and from a different angle.  A kayaker was checking her out too.

 

 

On yet another day recently and in some different geography, notice the vessel?

I checked the same location a few hours later, and the fog had moved on or just plain dissipated, revealing USCGC Coho. If you’re interested in a tour of the cutter, click here.

All photos, WVD.

If you have a hankering for more boats-in-the-fog photos, do a google image search with the search string “fog tugster.”

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