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The first in this series posted eight years ago!

Of course, tugs currently working in freshwater haven’t necessarily started there, as is true of Manitou.

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Victorious had to traverse halfway around the world before quite recently beginning its life on the Great Lakes, such as it is now pushing hot asphalt seething within John J. Carrick.

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Ditto G. L. Ostrander, here pushing LaFarge barge Integrity.

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Josephine (ex-Wambrau) has likely had the greatest amount of saltwater time and distance before coming to the Great Lakes watershed.  Here she’s docked in the Maumee river with the Mightys . . .  Mighty Jimmy, Mighty Jake, and mighty small.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has more Mightys and more freshwater tugs to come.

 

Here’s the first post I did on Everlast.  What intrigues me about the tug is her convoluted path to the Great Lakes . . . Japan, Russian Far East, Greece, and now the borderlands between the US and Canada.  Carlzboats details it all here.  In fact, Carlz goes on to add the China details about her barge . . . Norman McLeod.

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Since she transports asphalt, she’s got one hot load, as explained here . . . 300 degrees F plus.

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Everlast, it has been great to meet you and watch you pass.  Her dimensions are approximately 143′ x 44.’

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Speaking of China, those stacks are at China, Michigan, that is.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I choose to interrupt the “go west” series here.  It will continue soon.  And why?  Late yesterday, emerging from the fires over in Sarnia it came . . .

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to enter the Black River.

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Draken‘s a beauty with carved European oakwood

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like above on the bow cap rail and below on one of many oarlock covers.

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Below it’s the captain to the right and the district 3 Lakes Pilot to the left as

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international crew prepares to slips the dock lines and

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head northward into a stormy Huron night.

I’m back and–before catching up on my time off the internet–I need to pack the robots back into Cosmoline and close out some January 2016 dredging business . . . here’s my most recent Professional Mariner article.  And below are some additional photos of the research done in June 2015.

This is what 1100 + cubic meters of misplaced river bottom looks like after it’s sucked up and being transported to another location where scour demands it be added.

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And that red boat in the distance is the client, at least the

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verifier for the client.

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Once in the designated discharge site, hydraulic ram start to press the

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hulls apart, and

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all that bottom finds itself in gravity’s grip and

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tumbles out.

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Now only some water remains as the vessel–Ocean Traverse Nord–returns to the worksite and

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lowers the arm to suction up another 1100+ cubic meters

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of gallivanting silt piles, here shown in patches of green.  Notice the darker rectangle, representing the location of the dredger hull.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

For video, click here and start at 13:51.

Two tugboats built that year are still around:  Daniel McAllister (108.9′ x 23′) was built in Collingwood on Lake Huron, and Pegasus (96′ x 23′) on the Chesapeake in Baltimore.  Pegasus was launched as S. O. Co. No. 16 and Daniel  . . . as Helena.  Daniel worked until the 1980s;  Pegasus worked until 1997, retiring after nine full decades of service. Pegasus still runs, making its most recent trip here.

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Off Pegasus‘ stern, that’s the lightship/luxury yacht Nantucket.

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Daniel is in the old port of Montreal, certainly a place to wander around for awhile.

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Here Pegasus was about to depart Caddell Dry Dock back in March 2010.

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And here Pegasus was returning to the sixth boro from Mystic back in October 2010.

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I’m wondering about the claim that Daniel is the second largest preserved tugboat in the world.  I believe Hercules–also 1907!!!–is the largest at 151′ x 26.’  Where does Pegasus rank in this comparison:  third, fourth, ??

 

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

Many thanks to Steve Seely of New Brunswick, Canada, for sending these photos and this story. Never heard of a “quarantine tug?”  Well, neither had I.  But here it is, launched at Bath Iron works in October 1932 as a tug for the US Public Health Service, christening with ginger ale–since it happened to be Prohibition era.  If you have 50 minutes, here’s a 1936 film from the US National Library of Medicine at NIH on the work of these vessels;  good references in the movie to Hoffman Island and Ellis Island.  I’d forward to about five minutes in for historical background;  quarantine tug activity, including clips of vessels like the one below, starts at about the six-minute mark.

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Here’s some specs on the vessel: T. B. McClintic is “built of riveted Norwegian Steel (Charcoal Iron)… 60 feet, 10 inches in length overall with a 16.5 foot breadth and a 9.2 foot draft. At launching, [she] displaced 65 tons.  This single screw vessel with its engine–direct reversible Standard Motor Construction Company diesel engine with 100 horsepower … four-cylinder, eight-and-one-half- inch bore by 12-inch stroke weighing 13,475 pounds–turning a 50-inch diameter, 36-inch pitch bronze propeller at 350 RPM, cruised at an average of 10 knots.”

During her life as a quarantine tug, she operated out of Boston, Norfolk, and finally Baltimore, where she also performed some light ice breaking work.  The photo below shows her in Baltimore in the early 1960s.

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In the early 1960s, she was sold at government auction and purchased by “City of Wilmington, North Carolina, to become the city’s new fireboat, she was completely rehabilitated by the Wilmington Iron Works in order to perform her new function. This included adding a full array of fire-fighting equipment, replacing her original 100 HP engine with a new Gray Marine 671 Diesel which increased her HP to 185, and installing a new Twin-Disc 4.5 to 1 reduction transmission. In addition, due to dangerous rust-pitting on each side of the bow, the forward steel plating was replaced. The conversion cost the city approximately $18,000. … Renamed Atlantic IV, she “was distinguished as the only ship that could sink the battleship USS North Carolina in one of her first services after conversion to a fireboat, when her hoses were used to fill the great ship’s bilge with water in order to settle her into her permanent berth in the Cape Fear River.”

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From 1987 until the present, she’s been owned privately.  The photo below, taken by current owner Steve Seely, was taken in Baltimore in 2012. Here I quote Steve:  “I bought [her] in Baltimore in 2011 and brought it to New Brunswick, Canada in 2012.  I happened to pass through NY Harbor to take advantage of the lack of swells in Long Island Sound.”

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He continues:  “The photo underway show it moving as fast as it’s Detroit Diesel will push it, just shy of 11 Kts.  It’s an official antique by your standards but that doesn’t mean it can’t work. I salvaged a sunken barge in St Andrews harbor this summer.”

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And what identification does she sport on her stern?

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Her original name and Bath,  Maine.  The tug’s namesake was ” a University of Virginia Medical School graduate and twelve-year veteran PHS officer, Thomas B. McClintic. In 1911, at the age of thirty-eight, McClintic was detailed to Montana to perform research on Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. In August of 1912, McClintic contracted the disease and died.”

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The tug has its own website here.  The info quoted above not by Mr Seely comes from the application for her admission to the National Register of Historic Places, which makes for fun reading if you wish.

Because of the dimensions and certain missions of T. B. McClintic–boarding ships for quarantine purposes and ice breaking–this vessel is a forerunner of the WYTLs that will soon start to work the Hudson River ice chokepoints.  Click here for an unpublished magazine article I posted less than a year ago on the “extended cabin” sixth-boro WYTLs.

Steve, thanks much for writing.

I supposed you’ve read about the latest Bath Iron Works(BIW) vessel, but if not, check out the Zumwalt here.  Click here for previous mentions of BIW vessels on this blog.

 

 

John van der Doe has contributed many photos from Hamilton over the years, like here and here.

The bunkering boat Sterling Energy after delivering fuel to the Dutch tanker Stella Polaris.  Wow . . . Sterling Energy is Turkish built in 2002.

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Pusher-tug Victorious with her asphalt tanker-barge John J. Carrick.  Victorious was built in China in 2009.

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Again, John, thanks for these photos and a glimpse of Hamilton and the vessels that work there.

 

American Narrows is not a political statement;  it’s a geographical location in the St. Lawrence River between mainland Jefferson county and Wellesley Island, which is divided between the US and Canada. The River is narrow but deep, with fast currents and hard rock.   The Thousand Islands Bridge,  in most of these shots, spans the Narrows.

Check out Nordana Emma‘s port history, headed here from Ontario to Tunisia.

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The international boundary goes through here just to the right of that boat house in photo center, Flat Huckleberry Island (US) to the left and Gig Island (Canada) to the right.

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To digress, we are a few miles from the Narrows, but the islands are so beautiful, although some of the names seem intended to terrify.  Below is Deathdealer Island.  Other nearby islands with inhospitable names include Bloodletter and Axeman.  In spite of the name, over 1000 of the islands are inhabited, and two with stunning construction are Dark Island and  Heart Island.  But I’ll just stop the digression here.

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For an itinerary as ambitious as Nordana Emma‘s, check Federal Danube‘s port history.

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Note Rock Island Light on the horizon lower left.

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Below, Federal Danube crosses Nordana Sarah right off Clayton NY.  Again, notice the port history of Nordana Sarah.

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Unlike the vessels above, Algoma Guardian is now confirmed to the Great Lakes watershed ports, although she was built in Croatia.

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Tug Wilf Seymour and barge Alouette Spirit have appeared on this blog before, always together.  Wilf Seymour was launched in 1961 as M. Moran in Port Arthur, TX.

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All photos taken last week by Will Van Dorp, who’s grateful to Jake Van Reenen of Seaway Marine Group for conveyance.

The 94′ Red Star tug Ocean Queen, Bushey-built in 1941, towing the barge Bouchard No. 110 with 20,000 barrels of petroleum, was going up the East River on 12 March. The 572′  tanker Four Lakes, (likely not the ESSO tanker shown here) was going south when she rammed the Ocean Queen just below Hell Gate. The captain of Ocean Queen was lost; four other crew were rescued, and the barge did not sink.  Click here to find the “findings of fact and conclusions of law” by Judge Motley, September 1974.  Unrelated, Four Lakes was lost in February 1972 when it exploded during tank cleaning 60 miles off Galveston.

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Click here (and scroll) for a photo of this tug–Lac Manitoba–taken in May go this year.  In June, Lac Manitoba was one of two tugs that capsized in Cornwall, ON, sucked under while working upstream of a spudded barge.

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I also took a photo of Lac Manitoba here seven years ago in Ogdensburg, NY.

Many thanks to Harry Thompson for the top photo and to Jan van der Doe for the bottom one.

Here was “springtime.”  All the following photos taken by Jake Van Reenen this past summer show the variety of cargoes moved.

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Many thanks to Jake for use of these photos.

 

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