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Jake Van Reenen captured this procession yesterday on the upstream end of the Thousand Islands.  The photos are not bright, but that’s appropriate for a trip of this sort.

The you see a ship with towlines fore and aft and new paint splotches that appear to be covering something . . .

it means only one thing . . . “…Le Marc…”

towed here by Jarrett M and Lois M  (1945 and 1991)

used to be Quebec ferry Camille-Marcoux . . .

bound for Marine Recycling Corp in  Port Colborne, ON.  Maybe I’ll see parts of it there this summer when I pass the yard there.

And if you’re up at the south or upstream end of the Thousand Islands, say hi to Jake. 

More old steel today and all from Jan van der Doe.  I posted a stern view of the vessel below a few days ago . . . here’s more of the story, as much as I understand.  Between 1944 and 1990, it had German, Belgian, and Dutch owners, both governmental and private.  Since 1990, it’s been owned by Americans who keep it in Rotterdam.

The rest of these photos Jan took in Hamilton ON, and some of the boats

might be in greater jeopardy.  Florence M, Tony MacKay, and James A. Hannah have all been on this blog before, and with some of the same company.  One of these days, they may no longer be there, and they may no longer BE.

I gather these are Carrol C 1 and Bonnie B. from that same 2015 post.

Molly M I works for Nadro Marine and was built in 1962.

William is the name and Bermingham is the company here, and she’s almost 80 years old.   Unrelated:  What material is stored in the domes?

Many thanks to Jan for his updates from Rotterdam and Hamilton.

 

I’ve mentioned before that this is my miscellaneous category, although “everything” you pull out of your line locker or junk drawer is important for something, “miscellany” sounds dismissive.

Here’s how this post  works:  I’ll put in no comment until the second time through.  Starting with the one below, see the man face mostly down in the small craft sculling with right hand.  See the “cannon” forward, recoil preventer in place?

 

Someone’s altar?

I’d meant to include this a few weeks ago, but forgot.

And here . . . notice a splash of color where often you’d just read a phrase like “safety first” or “no smoking”?  Ice waters below and

lock walls here.

“Yes!!   I beat the ship,” thought he.   But why’s he blowing the horn so much, a**hole!!@#, thought he.

And finally . . . ever stop into a Wawa for coffee?  I’ll get back to that.

Reprise time.  See the gun there?  I paced it out at about nine feet long.  It’s a punt gun, formerly used by “market hunters” in a host of flyways, including locally along Long Island.  I finally visited the New York State Museum in Albany recently, and this is one of the displays.  Much more about punt guns and sneak boxes here.

Nearby in the Museum, here’s a sixth boro diorama.  Meseck boats came up in the previous line locker post also. And here’s the Carroll Towing post I’d wanted to include that 1946 clipping in.

And the painting on the forward side of the superstructure, here’s more on that CSL project to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the creation of an independent Canadian confederation.  And if you ever wonder what the francophone Canadians call the “Canada goose,” it’s a bernache du Canada.

And that SUP racing to cross the river in front  of a ship!  It’s that season, and soon conditions like those that created a near-fatal incident last summer will present themselves again.  Don’t be a statistic!  Here’s James Berman’s article from Workboat magazine with the “wheelhouse perspective.”

And Wawa, I’d read this and let it slip through my fingers.  They are having an ATB unit built.  Nah . . . not to transport coffee, which is sold at their midAtlantic convenience store gas stations. I’m wondering what they’ll call it . . . Wawa One?  Wawa Wanna cuppa?  Watuppa?

 

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who wishes you a happy and peaceful day..

When I first spotted this, I didn’t quite know what was happening.

 

Cold as it was, I’d put on enough layers to wait.

I’d call it path creating, not path finding,

Ocean Yvan Desgagnes opening the ice for Le Phil D,  a 1961 Russel Brothers Ltd. vessel.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

This is looking down an 18% grade at L’Isle-aux-Coudres.  Note the two ships–Algoma Mariner and an orange-hulled bunker called Federal Tyne–in the narrow channel.  The river is much wider on the far side, but shallower.   A photo of Federal Tyne appears at the end of this post. Tide is out.

Tidal fluctuation here is about nine feet.

See the stack markings on that tug?

It’s Felicia, built 1923 in Sorel, and hasn’t been McAllister since 1965.

I couldn’t get into the shipyard here, but I recognized these two boats . . .

Lampsilis (research) and Theodore (relaxation) from

June 2015 in Trois Rivieres and

Montreal.

 

Meanwhile, farther along the riverbanks but clearly for reflection, these shanties

accommodate folks who fish through holes.

Federal Tyne . . . I caught up with her here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And L’Isle-aux-Coudres, I have to get back there in summer.

 

Algoma Mariner (2011) heads upriver with a load of ore.  This time of year and until the St. Lawrence Seaway opens, Montreal is the head of navigation, so that’s where the ore will be discharged and sent further by rail.

Pilot exchange at Quebec City is facilitated by Ocean Ross Gaudreault (ORG).

 

 

Minutes after the exchange, ORG (94′ x 37′) cuts a swath back to the base

using its 5000 hp through the freshwater ice that’s come down from

Lake Saint Pierre.

Back in September, I got these photos of the pilots’ exchange.

 

For some info on the Canadian Pilots, Laurentian Region, click here.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Lomer-Gouin and

Alfonse Desjardins are twin 1971 ferries, or traversiers operating between Quebec City and Levis, but the organization has ferries between many other points on the St. Lawrence as well.

The word traversiers is easy to trace and associate, but the derivation of ferry is from Norse. 

These are no double ended ferries like those big orange ones in the sixth boro.

And the bow seems designed to ride up on and crush the ice.

Now I don’t know if there are still openings, but the sixth boro will soon have a more inclusive set of ferry stops as well.  I believe you can find the notices here.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who was too late for the ice canoe races this year, but next year, I’ll be there.   You have to see the photos in that link.

Thanks for all the guesses, and here are some photos from the past week.  This was taken at the outset of a steep grade descending into St. Joseph de la Rive and the Isle aux Coudres ferry.

See the ship in the ice between the mainland and the island above;  farther upstream here’s a closer up of Algoma Mariner, and here

an even closer look at what constant ice against the bow does to the paint.

And here’s the winter version of yesterday’s post, looking back at Quebec City.  Some of you were right even down to the street address of the pier.

And traversiers aka ferries between Quebec City and Levis. 

Yes, I love winter.  And this is southern Quebec.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.   For more previous Saint Lawrence photos on tugster, click here.   For photos from Jean Hémond, a Quebecois whose expertise is this environment, click here.

I had something different planned for today’s post, but when long-time reader and contributor Michele McMorrow sent along this photo, I was intrigued.  It’s cable layer Ile de Sein, which I’d noticed on AIS off Belmar NJ for some time, but  . .. as they say, I had other fish to fry, or roast.

It turns out Ile de Sein was involved in an interesting if sad project back in 2011.  So a question for the day . . . what’s it doing off New Jersey these days?

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Click on the photo below and you’ll see it and lots more on Alain Quevillon’s interesting Flickr page.  I put up the next photos because of a response I got to the posting about CCGS Tracy being for sale.  Ken Deeley wrote that so is CCGS Alexander Henry, and for a price lower than you’d pay for Tracy.  It seems the maritime museum in Kingston, ON included it for a time in their collection but then the museum, in financial distress, thinking to reef it in the deeps of Lake Ontario, learned that it would cost at least $420,000 to do that.    As an alternative, the big red boat will be towed to the Lake Superior port of Thunder Bay ON, near where it was built, to be part of a maritime museum there.  Current, the boat is docked in Picton ON–near Kingston on Lake Ontario–as its fate becomes clear.

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Ken also sends along the photos below, taken from the defunct museum’s website, he says.

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This outdoor telegraph looks in fine condition when this photo was taken.

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Many thanks to Michele, Alain, and Ken for these photos.

The tale is here . . . transporting fuel to northern Quebec by a very long flexible hose.  Go to Leo Ryan’s story on p. 74.  I’ve recently added Maritime Magazine to my blogroll.

Here’s the previous post by this title.

Let me start with the oldest ones not yet published.  There’s something timely about Tracy, the vessel below.  I took the photo from mid river between Ogdensburg NY and Prescott ON.  Are you hankering for a project?  Details below.

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The next day I got this photo as we entered Oswego.  RV Kaho was christened in this post I did a little over two years before.  Its mission is research on habitat and fish in Lake Ontario.  Here’s an article on that christening that mentions the meaning of the name in Ojibwe.

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I shot this last week as it was tied up at the dry dock in Bayonne, and wish I could have gotten closer.  Ferdinand R. Hassler was christened in 2012.  Its namesake is this gentleman, distinguished in two countries.

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Line has had light work this season in its role as a 65′ ice breaker.  Here’s an article I did on this 54-year-old vessel a few years back.

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I’m not sure where 343 is these days;  Feehan seems to be covering the North River these days.  Click here for photos of Feehan as she transited from Lake Ontario to the sixth boro.

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Fire Fighter II passes the hose rack–not water hoses–on the KVK.

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And here’s a twofer… a Staten Island ferry and a small USACE survey boat, I believe.

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So here’s why the top photo of Tracy is timely;  it’s for sale.    The minimum bid is $250,000 Canadian, which is a mere $189,880 US, given today’s exchange rate.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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