You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Canada’ category.

Guess the usage?

Avalon Sea is an AHTS vessel of the sort I’ve not seen call in the sixth boro.  Any guesses on usage, age, and dimensions of the unit?

 

If it reminds you of the various semi-submersible vessels that’ve called here, great, because that’s what Boabarge 37 is.  It measures 499′ x 125′  with a draft of 30′.  She’s on long-term lease to the Irving Shipyard in Halifax.  Avalon Sea is one of seven vessels operating for Secunda Canada, self-described as “a harsh weather fleet vessels serving Canada’s offshore gas and oil projects.”   Avalon Sea measures in at 300’x 66′ and propelled by 15,500 hp.  To see how Irving Shipyard uses Boabarge 37, check this out.

Point Chebucto is based in the Strait of Canso, but out behind her are two transients:

Behind her are Bylgia, a Heerema tug measuring 236′ x 59′ with 202 tons bollard pull, and Maersk Mobiliser, launched in late fall 2018 and 311′ x 82′ and currently tending craneship Thialf out by Sable island.

 

Here Bylgia is hooking up to 400′ x 125′ cargo barge H-407.  For specifics on Heerema equipment, click here.

All photos thanks to Jack Ronalds.  As I’ve said before, if you want to see some of them right now, click here  for his Marine Traffic snaps and here for his general photos, not limited to maritime shots.  The connection between the Strait of Canso and NYC’s sixth boro was highlighted in this post from a few days ago.

 

 

You saw a different version of this photo last week, NS Leader being assisted into Bayway.  This begs the question . . .  from where did NS Leader come?  Where did it take on the cargo discharged at Bayway?

The answer for NS Leader and lots more crude tankers is Point Tupper NS, where there’s a NuStar Terminal.  Maybe you’ve seen that on AIS.

Sailing a tanker from there looks a lot like here, although the Strait of Canso is quite a bit deeper than the Kills.  That’s Eagle Varna, a VLCC,  at the dock.  Smaller Eagle tankers (AET) used to call in the sixth boro, as in here and here, although I don’t recall seeing them recently.

Here Point Chebucto and Point Valiant assist Suezmax tanker Eagle San Antonio.

Here London Spirit departs the dock

with Point Chebucto and Svitzer Montreal to port and Svitzer Bedford to starboard.  NYK “Spirit” tankers used to call regularly in the sixth boro as in herehere and here, and maybe they still do.

Stena Weco tankers call in the sixth boro frequently as well:  Stena Concert, Stena Contest . . .  come to mind.

Here Switzer Bedford and Point Chebucto assist Stena Conquest

out to sea via the Strait.  Svitzer Canada is a towing branch of Maersk with a network of hundreds of boats.

Many thanks to Jack Ronalds for these photos.  More of Jack’s photos soon.  If you want to see some of them right now, click here  for his Marine Traffic snaps and here for his general photos, not limited to maritime shots.

Once US citizens are again welcome in Canada, I hope to make many trips, including one up his way.

Where was Doornekamp’s Sheri Lynn S heading?

Downstream on the St. Lawrence to assist USS St. Louis, LCS-19, as she was making a port stop in Ogdensburg NY.

Also assisting was Océan Serge Genois.

 

If this USN press release is current and accurate, other LCSs expected to exit the Great Lakes this year include USS Minneapolis-St. Paul (LCS-21), USS Kansas City (LCS-22), USS Oakland (LCS-24) and USS Mobile (LCS -6).

Now as seen from the US side of the River, standard procedure boom was deployed  around the LCS by a workboat provided by Seaway Marine Group.  More of this scene is captured in this article/photo from the Watertown Daily Times NNY360.

Once the LCS was boomed, the Seaway Marine boat patroled the exclusion zone.

 

 

Fifteen or so miles downstream from Ogdensburg, the Océan tug guides the LCS into the Iroquois locks.

 

All these photos from the Canadian side are compliments of Pat English, who posted a video on FB Seaway News Voie Maritime Info of the Ocean tug rocking back and forth to keep the LCS centered in the lock chamber.  All photos from the US side are compliments of Jake Van Reenen.

Again, many thanks to Pat and Jake for use of these photos.

Previous tugster posts with LCS vessels can be found here.  Previous posts at Iroquois lock are here.

 

I was doing maintenance in the  photo archives yesterday and took a second look at some photos from Damen and from Picton Terminals.  Since I know that Sheri Lynn S (SLS) arrived in Canada in Montreal in late fall, this has to be a photo of it being loaded onto the ship in Shanghai after traveling via the Yangtze from the shipyard in Changde, Hunan in China.  Given that, the tugs in the background could now be scattered all over the world.

This photo shows the boat being secured to the deck,again in Shanghai.

After the ocean voyage between the photo above, SLS arrives in a port at the end of her voyage, and that port has to be

Montreal, given the blue tugboat here, Ocean Georgie Bain.

And now for a few photos from her current habitat on the NE corner of Lake Ontario, SLS breaks ice, sometimes . . .

enabling the cement ship to dock.

In fact, this time of year, ice breaking is her main activity.

Many thanks to Damen and Picton Terminals for these photos.

A picture is worth a thousand words, even if the picture is a video still and grainy.  This picture launched a 1000  (actually about 1300) words, which you can read in the embedded link at the end of this post.

So, just the basics will be in this post, since the story is in the link.

It was cold and dark in early December when Sheri Lynn S cracked some new ice in departing from the dock in Picton ON,

heading into Picton Bay

to meet this ship . . . delivering steel from Korea.

Communications describe how the ship intends to dock, and

Sheri Lynn S accommodates the plan, crew on the tug here prepare to send a line up to the crew on the ship.

 

Once the ship Lake Erie is secure, the tug heads into the frozen area of the Bay

to tie up until the next job.

Here are some shots on Picton Terminals last summer.

Click here for the article I did on the boat, crew, and operation.

Many thanks to Picton Terminals for assistance.  All photos except the video still at the beginning by Will Van Dorp, who will have additional news from Picton soon.

A friend who works on the Great Lakes sent me these next two photos recently.  When I saw Anglian Lady in the foreground, my first thought was that I’d seen her myself but she looked somehow different.  More on that later.

Anglian Lady was Thornycraft built and launched in Southampton UK as Hamtun, a 132′ x 31′ steam tug that operated for the company now known as Red Funnel. From there, it was sold to interests in Belgium and then back in England before being purchased by Purvis Marine of Sault Ste. Marie.

But the tugboat I recalled was not Anglian Lady.  It was another distinctive tug by Purvis Marine below.

I was thrilled back in September 2017 when I got out in front of it here.  Location?  Some clues are the structures beyond the bow and the stern of this tug.

Avenger IV is the tug I recalled.  She’s from Cochrane 1962, a former steam tug, 120′ x 30′.

The location?  This is a dozen miles east of the Mackinac Bridge.

The PML website can be found here.

Many thanks to the Great Lakes mariner for the first two photos and for getting me to have a second look at Purvis Marine.

And the G-tugs in the background of the top photo likely include Minnesota and North Dakota.

 

If my post-entitling were consistent, this would be the twelfth post with pics from Mike.  Of course, if it were differently consistent, this would be Lois M 4.   Yes, 4 because of this post which would be Thanks to Jake . . . and a number. OK, I’ll stop with all the meta-commentary.

Nevertheless, Lois M is still in town, hibernating  . . .  you might say,  waiting not so much for spring as for completion of the work on her barge.

To highlight her size . . .  she ‘s 108′ x 35′ x 18’ and propelled by 4800 hp.

To quote the GLtugs site, she’s a “z-drive tug was built in 1991 by Matsuura Tekko Zosen of Higashino, Japan as the Lambert for Cleveland Cliffs-Robe River Iron in Australia.”

Note the WTC 1 beyond the stern deck and

the Empire State Building and Williamsburg Bridge beyond her here.

Many thanks, Mike.

 

 

Guess the vessel cut off to the right?

The tug is Lois M, on hold in Brooklyn for about a month already.

It turns out she came to GMD with barge Tobias for a haircut and a shave, and maybe some new paint.

After the shipyard work, Lois M and Tobias might be headed across the pond ….

Given the size of the graving dock, Tobias is a huge barge.

Many thanks to Mike Abegg for these photos.

And that bowsprit . . . it belongs to Clipper City.

Whenever I’ve seen this vessel, I had associations with a huge river in a big country.

These blue-white designs, though, didn’t conjure up that tropical river, yet they were strangely familiar.

The “upside-down V” didn’t initially strike me a Greek letter lambda either.

Later I started looking differently to try to figure out why that Greek frieze design looked familiar.  I’ve only been in Greece once and that was almost half a lifetime ago. Now it strikes me as strange that I didn’t think of the huge multinational e-commerce and tech company, the one who created a zillionaire.

Amazon Beauty was once Greek-flagged, but it’s not any more.  Now it appears to be shuttling some product between Point Tupper NS and Linden NJ.

Have you figured out the blue/white pattern and why it might be familiar?

Click here for the New York coffee cup, the ubiquitous vessel for coffee at one time, and now eclipsed by DD and Starbucks.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who send greetings to the photographer up in Point Tupper, who will get photos when she arrives.

 

An unusual profile sailed into the Narrows recently, and what I read says she’s powered by Niigata engines.  Anyone know much about these engines?  The company also builds railroad equipment.

I assumed she’d be in under cover of darkness, but towing a 400′ x 100′ deck barge, she made slow time along the south side of Long Island.

I’m not sure I understand the impact of cold on my camera, but I got these photos from more than half a mile off.

After towing barge Tobias in on the wire, she rounded up in Stapleton and made up alongside.  Eventually, she got assistance and brought the barge into the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

 

For more info on Lois M, check here out here and here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,408 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

October 2020
M T W T F S S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031