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When I first spotted this, I didn’t quite know what was happening.

 

Cold as it was, I’d put on enough layers to wait.

I’d call it path creating, not path finding,

Ocean Yvan Desgagnes opening the ice for Le Phil D,  a 1961 Russel Brothers Ltd. vessel.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

This is looking down an 18% grade at L’Isle-aux-Coudres.  Note the two ships–Algoma Mariner and an orange-hulled bunker called Federal Tyne–in the narrow channel.  The river is much wider on the far side, but shallower.   A photo of Federal Tyne appears at the end of this post. Tide is out.

Tidal fluctuation here is about nine feet.

See the stack markings on that tug?

It’s Felicia, built 1923 in Sorel, and hasn’t been McAllister since 1965.

I couldn’t get into the shipyard here, but I recognized these two boats . . .

Lampsilis (research) and Theodore (relaxation) from

June 2015 in Trois Rivieres and

Montreal.

 

Meanwhile, farther along the riverbanks but clearly for reflection, these shanties

accommodate folks who fish through holes.

Federal Tyne . . . I caught up with her here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And L’Isle-aux-Coudres, I have to get back there in summer.

 

Algoma Mariner (2011) heads upriver with a load of ore.  This time of year and until the St. Lawrence Seaway opens, Montreal is the head of navigation, so that’s where the ore will be discharged and sent further by rail.

Pilot exchange at Quebec City is facilitated by Ocean Ross Gaudreault (ORG).

 

 

Minutes after the exchange, ORG (94′ x 37′) cuts a swath back to the base

using its 5000 hp through the freshwater ice that’s come down from

Lake Saint Pierre.

Back in September, I got these photos of the pilots’ exchange.

 

For some info on the Canadian Pilots, Laurentian Region, click here.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Lomer-Gouin and

Alfonse Desjardins are twin 1971 ferries, or traversiers operating between Quebec City and Levis, but the organization has ferries between many other points on the St. Lawrence as well.

The word traversiers is easy to trace and associate, but the derivation of ferry is from Norse. 

These are no double ended ferries like those big orange ones in the sixth boro.

And the bow seems designed to ride up on and crush the ice.

Now I don’t know if there are still openings, but the sixth boro will soon have a more inclusive set of ferry stops as well.  I believe you can find the notices here.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who was too late for the ice canoe races this year, but next year, I’ll be there.   You have to see the photos in that link.

Thanks for all the guesses, and here are some photos from the past week.  This was taken at the outset of a steep grade descending into St. Joseph de la Rive and the Isle aux Coudres ferry.

See the ship in the ice between the mainland and the island above;  farther upstream here’s a closer up of Algoma Mariner, and here

an even closer look at what constant ice against the bow does to the paint.

And here’s the winter version of yesterday’s post, looking back at Quebec City.  Some of you were right even down to the street address of the pier.

And traversiers aka ferries between Quebec City and Levis. 

Yes, I love winter.  And this is southern Quebec.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.   For more previous Saint Lawrence photos on tugster, click here.   For photos from Jean Hémond, a Quebecois whose expertise is this environment, click here.

I had something different planned for today’s post, but when long-time reader and contributor Michele McMorrow sent along this photo, I was intrigued.  It’s cable layer Ile de Sein, which I’d noticed on AIS off Belmar NJ for some time, but  . .. as they say, I had other fish to fry, or roast.

It turns out Ile de Sein was involved in an interesting if sad project back in 2011.  So a question for the day . . . what’s it doing off New Jersey these days?

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Click on the photo below and you’ll see it and lots more on Alain Quevillon’s interesting Flickr page.  I put up the next photos because of a response I got to the posting about CCGS Tracy being for sale.  Ken Deeley wrote that so is CCGS Alexander Henry, and for a price lower than you’d pay for Tracy.  It seems the maritime museum in Kingston, ON included it for a time in their collection but then the museum, in financial distress, thinking to reef it in the deeps of Lake Ontario, learned that it would cost at least $420,000 to do that.    As an alternative, the big red boat will be towed to the Lake Superior port of Thunder Bay ON, near where it was built, to be part of a maritime museum there.  Current, the boat is docked in Picton ON–near Kingston on Lake Ontario–as its fate becomes clear.

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Ken also sends along the photos below, taken from the defunct museum’s website, he says.

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This outdoor telegraph looks in fine condition when this photo was taken.

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Many thanks to Michele, Alain, and Ken for these photos.

The tale is here . . . transporting fuel to northern Quebec by a very long flexible hose.  Go to Leo Ryan’s story on p. 74.  I’ve recently added Maritime Magazine to my blogroll.

Here’s the previous post by this title.

Let me start with the oldest ones not yet published.  There’s something timely about Tracy, the vessel below.  I took the photo from mid river between Ogdensburg NY and Prescott ON.  Are you hankering for a project?  Details below.

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The next day I got this photo as we entered Oswego.  RV Kaho was christened in this post I did a little over two years before.  Its mission is research on habitat and fish in Lake Ontario.  Here’s an article on that christening that mentions the meaning of the name in Ojibwe.

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I shot this last week as it was tied up at the dry dock in Bayonne, and wish I could have gotten closer.  Ferdinand R. Hassler was christened in 2012.  Its namesake is this gentleman, distinguished in two countries.

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Line has had light work this season in its role as a 65′ ice breaker.  Here’s an article I did on this 54-year-old vessel a few years back.

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I’m not sure where 343 is these days;  Feehan seems to be covering the North River these days.  Click here for photos of Feehan as she transited from Lake Ontario to the sixth boro.

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Fire Fighter II passes the hose rack–not water hoses–on the KVK.

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And here’s a twofer… a Staten Island ferry and a small USACE survey boat, I believe.

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So here’s why the top photo of Tracy is timely;  it’s for sale.    The minimum bid is $250,000 Canadian, which is a mere $189,880 US, given today’s exchange rate.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Thanks to all of you who send me photos.  M & M McMorrow sent this photo taken at Atlantic Highlands just before Christmas.  And yes,

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Delta is the best Christmas red. I can’t seem to find a tugboat in the NMFS.NOAA registry called just “Delta.”   Someone help out?

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Richie Ryden took these photos just before New Year’s, sending them along with the note “I took these pic’s on 12/28/16 on the Hackensack River between Rt 3 east & west Bridges , It looks like they a are rebuilding the marina there !!! I saw Reliable from Coastline Marine Towing out of Belford NJ  switching barges empty for a full one with old pilings on it ! look at your blog all the time keep up the good work !!!! Happy New Year !!!!”

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Happy New Year, Richie!  And I have to admit I can find nothing about previous owners of Reliable also, although the late great John Skelson had a photo of her from a while back sans the upper house here.  Richie’s photos also helped solidify my image of what this vessel looks like compared with another Reliable that languishes up on the Oswego Canal. 

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Jed sent me this photo just after the start of 2017 with the note “Happy New Year from Maryland.  Here is your first tug of 2017, the ten-year-old Belgian Union Grizzly that I saw on the Scheldt in 2012.”   Thx Jed.  And since that time, she’s sent a half dozen more photos of European tugboats, which I’ll post soon.

photo date 6 SEPT 2012

And Tyler Jones must be losing his patience:  he sent me this photo back on November 1, and I still have not put it up.  What I love about this photo, Tyler, is the fog giving the impression that Coral Coast pushing a cement barge upriver at Poughkeepsie  is weightless, floating lazily on the clouds.  Thx much, Tyler.

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Jan van der Doe periodically sends me photos from Canadian Lake Ontario ports.  He didn’t identify this boat although I’m wondering if it’s Lac Manitoba, which capsized on the Ottawa River back in June 2015.

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In Hamilton harbor, here’s (l to r) Florence M, Tony Mackay, and James A. Hannah.   Hannah is a sister of Bloxom, the cover model for my documentary about the Arthur Kill graveyard and the most intact tugboat in the graveyard on the Arthur Kill.

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And finally, on December 12, here are more McKeil boats tied up in Hamilton.

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Thanks much M & M, Richie, Jed, Tyler, and Jan.

 

 

Back on December 4, two formerly McAllister tugboats departed the home base in Mariners Harbor (typically referred to as “Mariners”) for Muskegon Michigan.  Word is that they have now safely arrived.

A few days after they departed NYC, Nelson Brace caught this photo of the two traversing the Cape Cod Canal.

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On December 19, Michel Gosselin caught these photos of the two unbound from Lock 2 of the Welland Canal, many cold blustery, and icy days later.

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Many thanks to Nelson and Michel for use of these photos.  Hats off to the crew . . . better yet, given that ice, keep your hats on.

Below is the screenshot of the tow arriving in Muskegon late Christmas Eve.

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It would be nice to see some of the photos crew might have taken as they crossed the stormy Gulf of Saint Lawrence and fought their way across Lake Ontario with strong winds out of the NW.  And I’m looking forward to seeing them in Port City Tug colors.

 

 

I’m going to play catch up, starting back in October.  This is Quebec City.

I’ve posted figureheads here and here before, even figureheads on a non-wind vessel like here.  But here’s a sequence that suggests that figureheads can come and go.  The first photo, taken at 10:22, shows the small push boat Vezina moving a convenient sized barge to

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to the cruise ship to

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offload the garbage.  By the time, I made my way to the port side, Vezina had acquired a figurehead and

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when the barge dumpsters were filled, there appeared to be some interaction between figurehead and crew, mimicry.

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I took these photos in October in Quebec City.

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I have no info on whether this figurehead has since been released.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

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