You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Canada’ category.

Here’s an index for the previous in the series.

I got this photo in July 2003 in Oswego, the 1943 Bushey tug  WYTM-71 Apalachee.  I haven’t seen it since, although it was at one time in Cleveland.  Anyone know if it’s still there?

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Here’s another Great Lakes tug, for now.  This photo of James A. Hannah was taken by Jan van der Doe in Hamilton harbor in late May 2015.  I posted it here then in this larger context.  And here in February 2012, thanks to Isaac Pennock.  Now I knew that James (LT-820, launched July 1945) was a sister to Bloxom (LT-653) and that the Hannah fleet had been sold off in 2009 in a US Marshal’s sale, but I hadn’t known until yesterday that the CEO of the Hannah fleet–Donald C. Hannah–was Daryl C. Hannah’s father!!  That Daryl Hannah!  But it gets even better, there once was a towboat named Daryl C. Hannah!  Anyone know what became of it?  Last I could find, it was on the bank of the Calumet River used as an office.  Updates?

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As you can tell, this photo was taken in the East River.  It was July 2009 that Marjorie B. McAllister escorts Atlantic Superior as it heads for sea.  Any ideas where Atlantic Superior is today?   Actually, I know this one . . . after a long and eventful life, she powered herself over to China this year to be scrapped.

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I haven’t seen Bismarck Sea here in quite a while, but last I knew, she was operating in the Pacific Northwest.

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King Philip . . . went to Ecuador around 2012; Patriot Service is still working in the Gulf of Mexico, I believe.

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And to round out this glance back, here’s a list of WW2 vessels still operating at the time of its compilation.  Many thanks to aka Fairlane for putting it together.

Thanks to Jan van der Doe for the Hannah photo;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

By the way, it was rewatching The Pope of Greenwich Village that got me to wonder about Daryl Hannah.

I’ve never been to St. John, but Justin Zizes has recently on a voyage from the sixth boro, and he sent along these photos, ones that give a snapshot of one moment on a track into port.  The pilot boat meeting the ship was Capt. A. G. Soppitt

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Atlantic Spruce is Canadian built.

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Some other Atlantic Towing Limited (hardly limited!!) vessels at the base:  From right to left:  Atlantic Bear, Spitfire III, Atlantic Beaver, and Atlantic Hemlock.

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Again, thanks to Justin for these photos.  And let me reiterate that I’m really happy about the collaboration on tugster these days, especially these days that I’m busy like crazy with an endeavor I don’t want to talk about yet.  It’s good.  I’d be interested in a series of ports to which vessels sail from the sixth boro, as is the case with St. John.

 

A jolly tar sent me some photos that could be a continuation of Other Watersheds 17.  He was there recently, and these photos add to my desire to get back up there, since it’s been 25 years since I last saw this place.

Note the pilot boat.  Now I’ll use his words:  “MAERSK PALERMO northbound on St. Lawrence possibly bound for Nova Scotia or proceeding to sea.
Bridge in background connects mainland to Ile D’Orleans.  River SMOKES when it ebbs – 5+KTS.”

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To see Ocean Charlie (1973) in exactly the same location in February, click here. Quebec City has an average January temperature of 9 F, compared with 30 for the sixth boro. If you want cold, go up to Quebec’s north country to Inukjuak, where the average January temperature is -12 F.

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Ocean Tundra (2013) was built at Ocean’s own shipyard.   To her stern is Ocean K. Rusby (2005).  And the grain silos have also served as a projection screen.

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Ocean Echo II (1969)  is a pin boat.

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Ocean Guide returns from a call, fighting a current.

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From a month ago, here are some other Ocean tugs, these in Hamilton.

For the entire Ocean tugboat fleet, click here.

Again, many thanks to the jolly tar.

For some stats on Canadian ports, click here.  Montreal–upriver from Quebec City– is one the the big four Canadian container ports; for info on the four, click here.

As an example of how large this watershed is, the photo below was taken on June 2; at that point Vikingbank was inbound from Sweden upbound near the intersection of the St. Lawrence and Lake Ontario and headed for Duluth.  It arrived in Duluth to load grain only June 15!!   Click here for a site that demonstrates just how huge this watershed is.

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Click here, here, and here for some posts I did between Lake Ontario and Montreal, location of the retired LaChine Canal, where the retired Daniel McAllister is on display.  To the right in the photo are the elevators that dominate the old city waterside.

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South of the elevators these vessels were docked.  I know . . . it’s a poor quality photo, but I’m hoping someone can identify the sailing vessel to the left.

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Looking downbound from Parc de la Cité du Havre, there’s a very Dutch-looking tug yacht Theodore and Turkey-built Algonova.

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Also, this container assemblage in the park is the jumping off point for some

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beefy looking “get wet” boats.  “Saute moutons” literally means “jump sheep.”

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Farther downriver in Trois-Rivieres, Chaulk Determination appears to be in limbo after a serious incident half a year ago.

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And in the interest of time, let’s leave the St. Lawrence here for now.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Back to the jaunt in the St Lawrence watershed, specifically my itinerary was from Clayton mainland to Grindstone Island, then return to the mainland, then southwest to Cape Vincent, and then to Kingston, Ontario.  To get to Kingston from Cape Vincent involves two ferries:  one from Cape Vincent to Wolfe Island in Canada and then after a 20-minute drive across Wolfe, another ferry from Marysville to Kingston.  Here’s a map.

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In an archipelago like the Thousand Islands (actually I read there are over 1800 islands fitting the parameters that an “island” remains above the water all year round AND has at least one tree), boats are ubiquitous and landing craft like these two are invaluable.  Summer populations swell the numbers of residents.  Historically, a lot of the wealthy from centers like NYC came up here and built big.  The island out beyond the two LCM-8s here is Calumet Island, and that tower is the only significant remnant of Calumet Castle, built by Charles Emery, a tobacco entrepreneur from Brooklyn. Click here and here for more info about Emery, just one of the players here during the Gilded Age.

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photo taken from Grindstone Island, looking toward Calumet Island and Clayton

In this watershed, pilotage is provided by a total of five providers.  The pilot boat below is at the Cape Vincent station of the St Lawrence Seaway Pilot Association. Notice how clear the water is.

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M/V William Darrell has operated as ferry between Cape Vincent and Wolfe Island since 1952!  Its dimensions are 60′ x 28,’ and later in this post you’ll understand why I’m telling you that.   Scroll through here and you’ll learn that the H on the stack stands for Horne;  the Horne family has been operating the ferry since the 1820s, . . . almost 200 years.  Click here and scroll to see this ferry with a Winnebago on it a few years ago.

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M/V William Darrell entered service as a 12-car ferry.

The Wolfe Island wind farm has operated since 2009.

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Wolfe Island  as seen from the ferry Frontenac II to Kingston

 

Frontenac II, 1962 built, has dimensions of 180′ x 45′.

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as seen from onboard

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as seen from the Kingston land’s edge

Island Queen and other vessels take passengers through parts of the archipelago.

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Of course I found one, although there was no name.

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On leg 1 of my return to Cape Vincent aboard Frontenac II, I saw four vessels like this with . . . lunker? rig.

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When I got back to M/V William Darrell, there was just me,  until this bus pulled up.  But the ferry crew took in stride what would have me worried.

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We crossed, and all went without incident.

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The only downside was that the bus drove off first, straight to the immigration both, and I spent a good 20 minutes as the passengers’ documents were checked.  Had the immigration waved me through first, I could have been halfway to Watertown before the bus cleared.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who might not post for a few days because the gallivant work trip downstream goes on.

Here, here,  and here are north country posts from a few years back.

Here’s the index.

Since I grew up in western New York and my grandparents lived 30 or so miles off to the right of this photo, crossing this bridge happened several times a year.  It was by far the biggest bridge in my world.   That’s Canada to the right.

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Baie Comeau (2013) upbound under the Thousand Islands Bridge

The bridge was completed in 1937, weeks ahead of schedule.  Canada, which appears to have no equivalent of the US-Jones Act, uses China-built vessels like Baie Comeau.  I saw a one-year-older sister here last October.

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Over in Kingston, I learned this vintage but functional crane today had been mounted on a barge and used in the Thousand Island Bridge construction back in the 1930s. There are several cranes of this design along the Erie Canal, some also still functional.  For one, check out the sixth photo here.

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In an archipelago called “thousand islands,” there’s need for lots of boats for commuting and transport.  Check out the lines of the white-hulled 25′ boat to the right.  Now check photos seven and eight in this post.  Spirit of Freeport is also a 25′ and it crossed the Atlantic!  A few more perspectives of Spirit of Freeport can be seen here, scroll through. To hear builder Al Grover, click here.

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Click here for info on Jolly Island.

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The proximity of Antique Boat Museum may draw classics here, wherever they might have been built.  Anyone identify the make?

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Vikingbank has an interesting bow.

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Clayton waterside with St. Mary’s steeple to the right.

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Check out the etymology of “delfzijl

R/V Seth Green is a fisheries research vessel based in Cape Vincent.  Last year I caught the christening of another Lake Ontario research vessel here.

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Wilf Seymour used to be M. Moran.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will add more photos from this watershed later.

Many thanks to Seaway Marine Group for conveyance.

 

All these photos come compliments of frequent commenter Jan van der Doe.  And all were taken in Hamilton Harbour, the southwest corner of the lake where I learned to swim.

Hamilton is headquarters for McKeil Marine, whose vessels have been posted on this blog herehere and here.

Click here for the specs on Leonard M.

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Click here for info on Tony MacKay.

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Florence M needs TLC and paint.

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Here’s another shot of Tony and Florence.

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From left here, more McKeil Marine vessels:  Carrol C 1, Bonnie B, and James A. Hannah.  This latter (rightmost) tugboat has appeared on tugster before, and in fact is a sibling of Captain Bob (in the Columbia) and Bloxom, the faded red tugboat on the cover of our 30-minute documentary film Graves of Arthur Kill.  If you want to read about the dispersion of the entire Hannah fleet by the U. S. Marshal’s auction, click here.

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Here’s a side view of the same three boats.

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Click here for the specs on Kingfish 1.  

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Believe it or not, this blue-hulled vessel below dates from 1959 and used to be known as Helen M. McAllister.   Here’s her story as told from a different perspective.

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Jerry G. is one year younger.  Click here for more info.

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This looks like two old but active boats,  Lac Manitoba and Vigilant I, both of Nadro Marine.

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And finally, Jan didn’t pass along info on the black hulled vessel to the left. Pacific Standard . . . ex-Irishman (?) is my guess.

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I visited Hamilton twice 50 or more years ago to visit a relative there.  I recall not liking the city.  But what does a kid know?  Jan’s photos in this post and tugboathunter’s here inspire me to consider a return there.

Jan . . . many thanks.

Somewhat related, for a great database of Owen Sound-built boats, click here.

tug Bayridge Service & barge in L3barge Houston with tug Eileen Mbarge Houston on delivery voyage with tug Eileen MTenacious light tug headed for L2tug Barbara Andrie dbnd abvoe L7 with barge A-390barge Innovation and tug Samuel de Champlain at guard gate upbnd (3)HHMisner light tug upbnd to L2tug Commodore StraitsTechno St

Many thanks for use of these photos, all taken about seven years ago, to Barry Petersen.  Vessels are:  Bayridge Service, Eileen Roehrig and barge Houston on delivery, Tenacious, Barbara Andrie, Samuel de Champlain, H. H. Misner, Commodore Straits, and Techno St. Laurent.

 

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Twenty four hours does include more darkness now than light, so here were:  Algoma Transport at the dock in Port Colborne, Algoma Hansa, Algoeast, Cedarglen, Petite Forte, Peter B. Cresswell, Fortunagracht, and  . . . now northbound, Algoma Transport.  And there’s no better place to watch all night long than from the Inn at Lock 7.

 

Here were the first and second in this series.   And I could renumber and make this #4, since I posted a screen grab of tug in  Carlito’s Way here . . . last shot there . . . which turned out to be Dorothy Elizabeth.   Anyhow, the “grab” is somewhat blurry, but any guesses about the name of the movie or info on the boat?

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The figure near the stern here is actually Robert DeNiro . . .

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And the movie is  . . .  here.

 

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