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Whenever I’ve seen this vessel, I had associations with a huge river in a big country.

These blue-white designs, though, didn’t conjure up that tropical river, yet they were strangely familiar.

The “upside-down V” didn’t initially strike me a Greek letter lambda either.

Later I started looking differently to try to figure out why that Greek frieze design looked familiar.  I’ve only been in Greece once and that was almost half a lifetime ago. Now it strikes me as strange that I didn’t think of the huge multinational e-commerce and tech company, the one who created a zillionaire.

Amazon Beauty was once Greek-flagged, but it’s not any more.  Now it appears to be shuttling some product between Point Tupper NS and Linden NJ.

Have you figured out the blue/white pattern and why it might be familiar?

Click here for the New York coffee cup, the ubiquitous vessel for coffee at one time, and now eclipsed by DD and Starbucks.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who send greetings to the photographer up in Point Tupper, who will get photos when she arrives.

 

An unusual profile sailed into the Narrows recently, and what I read says she’s powered by Niigata engines.  Anyone know much about these engines?  The company also builds railroad equipment.

I assumed she’d be in under cover of darkness, but towing a 400′ x 100′ deck barge, she made slow time along the south side of Long Island.

I’m not sure I understand the impact of cold on my camera, but I got these photos from more than half a mile off.

After towing barge Tobias in on the wire, she rounded up in Stapleton and made up alongside.  Eventually, she got assistance and brought the barge into the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

 

For more info on Lois M, check here out here and here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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I’ll start with a photo I took in Toronto in September.  I could read that it was called Coastal Titan, but I thought it was a floating dry dock confined to Toronto.  Then in October I saw a photo Marc had taken in July downstream of Montreal, showing

… the same Coastal Titan, pushed by what seemed an intriguingly-named but undersized Salvage Monarch.  And it’s not until today that I search the history of this unusual vessel.  Never in my wildest dreams did I imagine it was once a US-flagged heavy lift vessel named John Henry.   Click here for more of the history of this 1978 heavy lift ship and sister–Paul Bunyan–built by Peterson Builders in Sturgeon Bay WI. Coastal Titan is the survivor story here.

I believe Paul Bunyan, then James McHenry,  was scrapped in 2015; for a photo, see page 8 here.

Marc  also caught Eda (ex-Cedarglen) on her way to be scrapped at Aliaga, with Ocean Echo II on stern and

VB Hispania (2011 and Mangalia, Romania) on the bow.

Click here for previous photos by Marc, to whom I’m grateful for these photos that led me to the intriguing story of Coastal Titan.

 

 

Daylight hours are getting very short, reiterating summer 2019 is no more, but I’ve still got photos left from gallivants of warmer and brighter days this year, like this one of a

downbound Thunder Bay passing Rock Island Light, once legitimately tended by an erstwhile pirate William Johnston.

 

Later as we continued towards Lake Onrario, we followed Atlantic Huron, an ore boat we seem to have encountered frequently this season, here leaving Carleton Island to port and

Wolfe to starboard.

Soon after passing Tibbetts Point Light, we entered the NE corner of

Ontario.  By the way, the hostel beds previously available at Tibbetts Light will soon be no more.

And as Atlantic Huron disappeared in the distance, we passed John D. Leitch,

passing the light at Charity Shoal, a light over an impact crater.

I love that steering pole.

 

Then Leitch entered the funnel, leaving Wolfe Island to port and downbound waters become the Saint Lawrence.

All photos from a few warmer months back by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

 

. .  . starting with Canadian government boats, Coast Guard vessels and CCGS-to-be.  Tor Viking is the Davie Shipyard near Quebec City in Lévis, where she’ll be transformed into CCGS Vincent Massey,  a medium class icebreaker, following the wakes of sister ships into CCGS Molly Kool and CCGS Jean Goodwill.  Another CCGS, Sir Wilfred Grenfell, recently left Labrador for the long trip to British Columbia.

CCGS Sipu Muin has appeared here before with photos from her first pass.  Two days later she flew by even closer, determined to be seen.  That gull off her starboard looks spooked….

 

 

In the distance with the large green dome, that’s Canada’s largest church.

How about a US vessel–USS Indianapolis LCS-17–commissioned in Indiana less than a month ago, here transiting Quebec near the downstream end of the Saint Lawrence Seaway?  Here are my previous photos of LCS models  . . . and others’ photos are here.

And let’s conclude with local sixth boro NYPD marine crew monitoring something

on a red channel marker in the lower portion of the Upper Bay yesterday.

The USS Indianapolis photo comes with permission from Marc Piché, whose photos have appeared here previously.

All other photos by Will Van Dorp, who posted about NYPD boats previously here.

A few days ago I posted this twilight view of Service Boat No. 1.

So, I hope she ‘s more defined by these shots from a bit later in the port of Montreal, as she passes Toronto Express.

 

Ocean Macareux (translates as “Ocean Puffin”) follows the grain elevators on her way to –maybe–

attach some rendering. . . .

Farther along, a spud barge moved by GFFM‘s

Vent Polaire (tr. Polar Wind) seems standing by, assisted by this very

shallow draft prime mover.

Over by the Beauharnois Dam, Deschenaux (tr. Channels) stands by.

Click here for more info on the Beauharnois generating station.

Anyone know where and when Deschenaux was built?

Farther upstream yet, in Salaberry-de-Valleyfield, it’s Circle Polaire (tr. Polar Circle)

And closing out this post, Ocean A. Gauthier here heads downstream to assist Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin return to a floating condition. I believe she’s still undergoing repairs in the port of Johnstown ON.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here was “7” and 1 through 6.

This post will run photos from twilight to twilight…

Above and below, prosaically Service Boat No. 1 is doing pilot exchange duty.  She’s not large or particularly powerful or new, but in twilight before dawn she looked and sounded formidable.

Ocean Basques, here approaching the Laviolette Bridge, is a solid 200 miles upstream of the islands with the same namesake.

Ocean Basques was built in Collingwood ON, as was Ocean Sept-Isles.

Quite unique and speedy, Ocean Catatug 1 raced downstream.

As afternoon falls, Ocean Bertrand Jeansonne follows Ocean Henry Bain out of the homeport basin.

That’s the marine traffic control tower on the other side in Levis QC.

Returning to another twilight shot, here’s Ocean Henry Bain pushing a deep barge down bound.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

As mid-autumn displays her beauty at the approach to the Beauharnois Canal in the Seaway, my excitement spiked upon seeing MV Sinaa.

Sister ship to Nunalik, Sinaa was certain to be carrying specialized cargo delivery gear.  Here’s the rest of the NEAS fleet.  NEAS expands to Nunavut Eastern Arctic Shipping. For the difference between Nunavut and Nunavik, click here.  My first post with an NEAS vessel was here.

As we passed I saw I would not be disappointed.

The barges like Kangirsuk I and  II and the small tugs–I can’t quite make out the names. Anyone help?–are lowered into the waters near the Arctic destination so that they can shuttle cargo ashore.

Pangnirtung I and II make up the rest of the discharging equipment.

I’m hoping someone can help with the names of the small tugs and any additional info about them.  These NEAS tugs appeared previously on tugster here.   For a post I did on Inuit language, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who might be in a wifi dead zone the next few days.

 

I’ll get back to pretty wooden boats, but first . . . what’s this?  I missed its first pass, but the sound led me to check AIS, where I saw it was doing 33 kts . . .

Does Sipu Muin mean anything to you?

But here she is . . .CCGS Sipu Muin, an icebreaker/search&rescue hovercraft.

On her return she was doing 35 kts.

Her dimensions .  .  93′ x 40, roughly.   Click here for more info.

Click here for previous hovercraft on tugster.  Here’s more on this 70-ton vessel.

All otitis by Will Van Dorp.

This Stella Polaris . . . a very common vessel name for obvious navigation reasons, is less than 400′ and about 20 years old.  The curious building off the bow is the Boldt Castle Power House and Clock Tower . . .  or BCPHCT.

Algoma Conveyor, SLSWmax, was still under construction a year ago in Jiangsu, China.

Narie is another recent Chinese built cargo ship

in the Great Lakes, I’ve read, for the first season, although other Polsteam boats have worked there for some years.

The oldest Great Lakes port in the US is Oswego, and it sees lakers like the Japan-built cement ship NACC Argonaut fairly frequently.

With the right vessel, one can travel from the Great Lakes directly to NYC, of course, and when we did, we ran into Disney Magic, Italian built, Bahamian flagged, and Spain overhauled.

Making this likely the most diverse “random ships” post ever, here’s P61, an Irish patrol vessel named for Samuel Beckett. Unless I’m mistaken, this “writers” class comprises the largest vessels in the Irish Naval Service. Here’s a photo of Beckett leaving town yesterday taken by frequent commenter Phil Gilson.

Cembay is another Japan built cement carrier, 1997, shuttling between the US and Port Daniel QC. 

And finally . . .  YM World is, as of this posting, steaming toward Savannah, after shifting boxes here in Bayonne.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp within the past 30 days.

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