You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Pioneer’ tag.

Here was the first time I used this title.

America II looked resplendent bathed in a last burst of late afternoon sun yesterday.

am1

She was one of several sail vessels out;  here Pioneer seems headed over to a new loading point.

os1

On a meteorologically different afternoon a few weeks ago, I caught Lettie G. Howard out headed for the Kills. Here was another spring when I caught Lettie under very bare poles.

ov1

 

am2

 

0s2

I saw Topaz briefly only once, so far away she was only a tall mast, but Claude Scales caught this from his daily vantage point.  Click here for a close-up of Nantucket WLV-612 from three years ago.

0v2

No words . . . no gilding the lily!

am3

Pioneer heads back to the dock.

os3

Anyone know where Mary E is sailing from these days?

ov3

Thanks to Claude Scales for use of his Topaz photo.  All other photos by Will Van Dorp, who has used the title “autumn sail” much more frequently.  And if you have not yet read my article about sailing to Cuba last winter, you can read it here.

For context, let’s look back here. And last year among some of the great photos shared by Harry Thompson, here (scroll) was a crowded harbor photo I really liked.

Last Saturday saw threatening weather; even so, lots of small boats and crowds braved the possibility of rain to see the races.

pb

Vigilance prevailed and I heard of no incidents.

pb1

And yes, I paid a lot of attention to the Bath Maine-built 1906 Mary E, but that’s because I haven’t seen her in 9 years . . . obviously I was looking in the wrong places.  Click here and scroll for a photo of Mary E in Greenport almost 9 years ago.

pb1b

Harvey was there.  Scroll here for one of my favorite photos of the 1931 Harvey, cutting through the pack at the 2013 tugboat race.

pb1c

The 1885 Pioneer was there. Click here for a sail I did on Pioneer a few years back.

pb1d

A raft of small boats clustered yet kept orderly.

pb2

The 1935 Enticer  . . . well, enticed, spectators as a platform.

pb3

as did a range of people movers. 

pb4

including the 1983 Arabella.

pb5

The captain of the heavyweight out there, the 2014 Eric McAllister, treaded lightly through the crowd.

pb6

Of course, out in the mist along the Jersey side there are more heavyweights, a Moran tug and its huge NCL gem.

hww

And as for my ride, Monday morning it was earning money going for a load of scrap.

mmm

Another tall old ship that might have been present–the 1928 Bivalve NJ-based A. J. Meerwald had other missions to perform.

All photos by will Van Dorp.  And for photos of some of the people on the boro who were working during the race, check out NYMediaBoat’s blog post.

 

 

Here was part 1.  Thanks much for the comments.  My conclusion is that most but not all were taken at the 1986 centennial celebration of our lady of the harbor.    I am still seeking a photo of the canal tug Grand Erie, ex-USACE Chartiers, launched in 1951, at the event.

Barque Simón Bolívar it would be good to see her back in the sixth boro again.  At this point, she was less than a decade old.   This past summer, she called in various ports in the Caribbean.

0aaaaht8

Any help here anyone?

0aaaaht9

USS Iowa BB-61 served as the reviewing stand for the event.  Click here for scans of the day and here for video.  Can anyone identify the tug alongside the battleship starting at about 2:10?

0aaiowa

Barque Eagle of course.  Can anyone identify the tugs in this photo?

0aaaaht11

It’s schooner Pioneer in the background.

0aaaaht12

The red-hulled vessel at the foot of the tower .  . is that stick lighter Ollie, now rotting away in VerPlanck?  See the end of this post.   Anyone know the USCG tug?

0aaaaht13

These look like the morning-after spent fireworks shells.  What did it say in front of “industry” here?  And here ends the photos supplied by Harry Thompson.

0aaaaht14

And here, as a note that I should do a post soon about Ollie . . . is one of the photos I took of her in 2010.  I saw her earlier in 2015, and it’ was even sadder by five years than this one.  Anyone have good pics of Ollie in her day?

Thanks very much, Harry, for getting this show going.

There’s winter sail, spring sail, and autumn sail.  And today I’m just staying inside culling photos.   Since moving by wind has been around for millennia, Pioneer is a relatively modern vessel.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Pioneer, 1885

This vessel below can be “insanely fast.” I took this photos and ones that follow back on May 11, 2015 in Morris Canal.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Lending Club 2, 2015

Here’s another sixth boro regular, the largest NYC-based schooner.  See her here in winter maintenance.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Check out these special sails on Clipper City.

Here LC2‘s just finished the 635 nm run in less than 24 hours.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

From Seth Tane on the Columbia River, it’s HMCS Oriole, US-built in 1921.

0aaaass3

I’d love to see the interior of Lending Club 2, but my guess is . . . spartan.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Also from back in May . . . it’s Wavertree in the last feet of its transit for a major makeover, Thomas J. Brown sliding her over.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here’s another shot of L’Hermione entering the Upper Bay for the first time.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And what do you make of this?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Maybe more on that last photo tomorrow.

Except for the photo by Seth Tane, all photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

“Really random” posts tend to be far-flung, so let’s start out with this photo by Jed, who has contributed many photos recently.   Then there’s JED, who has contributed photos starting from 2008.   The boat dates from 1975.

photo date 27 APRIL 2015

From Jan Oosterboer via Fred Trooster, here’s the 1955 tug Argus along with

0aaaarrt2ARGUS, Calandkanaal-0941

Orion (1961), and

0aaaarrt3ORION, Calandkanaal-0947

0aaaarrt3aORION, Calandkanaal-010

Sirius (1966).  It appears that Sirius–like Orion and Brendan Turecamo–also has a wheelhouse that can be raised.

0aaaarrt4SIRIUS, Calandkanaal-0971

For the scale of the “tow” here, scroll down and

0aaaarrt3bSIRIUS, Calandkanaal-0989

behold–Thialf, with a combined lifting capacity of over 14,000 tons!!  Click here to see the view down from Thialf’s deck AND be sure to read the comments that follow.   Here are a few other heavy-lifters including Saipem 7000.

0aaaarrt5THIALF, Calandkanaal-060

Heading back to NYC but as  the South Street Seaport Museum area of the sixth boro of NYC  looked in 1985, from a secret salt, it’s the 1939 USCGC WYT-93, Raritan!  The two vessels around her are, of course 1885 schooner Pioneer and 1908 lightship Ambrose.  Click here for a list of specifics and missions on Raritan, but one of her operations was against M/V Sarah of Radio NewYork International.  M/V Sarah was eventually blown up for a movie stunt.

0aaaarrtrar

And rounding this post out . . . from Elizabeth, in Alameda, it’s  the 1943 YT-181 Mazapeta.

0aaaarrt9a

In the distance is T-AKR-1001 GTS Admiral W. M. Callaghan, an MSC RORO named for a significant USN officer.

0aaaarrt9b

Credit for each of these photos is as attributed.  Thanks to you all.

First, if you’re free today and within travel distance of Lower Manhattan, do yourself a favor and attend this event, 4 p. m., a book signing by Dr. James M. Lindgren.  His new book is a much needed complement to Peter Stanford’s A Dream of Tall Ships, reviewed here a few months ago.   Details in Preserving South Street Seaport cover almost a half century and will enthrall anyone who’s ever volunteered at, donated to, been employed by, or attended any events of South Street Seaport Museum.  Lindgren laments SSSM’s absence of institutional memory saying, “Discontinuity instead defined the Seaport’s administration.”  Amen . .  as a volunteer I wanted to know the historical context for what seemed to me to be museum administrations’ repeated squandering of  hope despite herculean efforts on the part of volunteers and staff I knew.

As my contribution to creation of memory, I offer these photos and I’d ask again for some pooling of photos about the myriad efforts of this museum over the years.

Pier 17.  April 17, 2014.  According to Lindgren, this mall opened on Sept 11, 1985 with a fireworks show.  Its demise may by this week’s end be complete.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

April 12, 2014.  Photo by Justin Zizes.

0aaaap412

Feb 23, 2014.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Jan 21, 2014 . . . Lettie G. Howard returns.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Sept 20, 2013.  This is the last photo I ever took FROM the upper balcony of Pier 17.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Sept 12, 2013.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

July 2012.  A fire had broken out on the pier, and Shark was the first on scene responder.   Damage was minimal, despite appearances here.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Now for some photos of vessels that have docked in the South Street area in the past half century.

July 2012 . . . Helen McAllister departs, assisted by W. O. Decker and McAllister Responder.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

June 2012.  Departure of Marion M as seen from house of W. O. Decker.  Photo by Jonathan Boulware.  The last I knew, Marion M is being restored on the Chesapeake by a former SSSM volunteer.

0aaaaaaaapjun12

Lettie G. Howard hauled out in 2009.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

2009. The Floating Hospital . .  . was never part of the SSSM collection.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

2009.  Maj. Gen. Hart aka John A. Lynch aka Harlem.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Helen McAllister with Peking and Wavertree.   Portion of bow of Marion M along Helen‘s starboard.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Mathilda posing with W. O. Decker in Kingston.  2009.

0aaaaaaaap

Moshulu now in Philadelphia.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

2005, I believe.  Spuyten Duyvil (not a SSSM vessel) and Pioneer.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Thanks to Justin and Jonathan for use of their photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp.  For many stories on these vessels, that mall, and so much more, pick up or download these books and read them asap.

 

 

Here was 9.

It seems that sailing just gets better as summer turns into fall.  Like Pioneer.   Click here for bookings via Water Taxi.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

America 2.0

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Shearwater

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Adirondack

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

There are also those sailing vessels I’d like to see under sail.  Like Angel’s Share with its twin helms, here

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

a close-up of the port helm.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Slim Gunboat 6606

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

with its Marshall Islands flag

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Heron . . . which I’ve seen as far south as Puerto Rico.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Clipper City

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I’d love to find the time and invitations to sail on all those wind vessels.  But I actually did sail on Pioneer the other day.  Come with the vessel and crew as we leave the pier,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

ride the wind in a busy harbor for a few hours, and

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

then lower sail before returning to the pier.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All fotos taken this week by Will Van Dorp.  Time’s now for me to head out and enjoy more of this autumn air.

Looks like I got lured outa town once again.    Meanwhile . . . Discovery Coast goes on hauling out dredge spoils, and

Pioneer sails toward Red Hook.  Note Mary Whalen in the distance.

And if you’re around on Thursday, make your way to Red Hook to buy stuff–art, tools, etc–to help raise funds for Mary Whalen.  Details here on Rick Old Salt’s blog.

Both fotos by Will Van Dorp, who will try to post fotos from along the course . . . .

Boro6 aka the sixth boro or New York harbor sees diverse vessels and and floats in and out staggering amounts of cargo.  I’m thrilled by the amount of collaboration this blog can muster.  Many eyes see more things.  Like Princess Danae, captured last week by John Watson.  Princess Danae has long since departed, but John pointed out a secret.  Any ideas?

The vessel is operated today by Classic International Cruises.  For scale, compare her beside Norwegian Jewel.  The secret?  Princess Danae began life in 1955 as Port Melbourne, a tanker general cargo vessel!  (Thanks for catching that, Bart!)

A first time foto from Capt. G. Justin Zizes, Jr.   . .  . it’s Maryland.  Welcome, Justin.

I’m putting the next two fotos here because I wonder if anyone can tell me what type of barge this is . . . long and narrow, towed  on a single diagonal line by

Thomas J Brown.  This is my second time to see Brown towing this barge.

A darker story awaiting enlightening here . . . the inimitable Elizabeth Wood took this foto some five or so years back.  It’s Lettie G Howard, dormant and in bondage for many months now, and for sale;  part of the sad dissolution

and crumbling happening at the museum formerly known as South Street Seaport.  Until a new plan for the ships (See these stories by  MWA, Old Salt,  and Frogma.)   even Pioneer will remained fettered.  SOS indeed, or given the age of Lettie G and Pioneer . . . should we make that CQD?   CQD!!    The MWA link has a tribute to Bernie also.

Thanks to John, Justin, and Elizabeth for these fotos and the collaboration.  The ones of Thomas J Brown and Pioneer by Will Van Dorp.   Type any of these vessel names (except Princess Danae) and you’ll get many previous appearances.  And, doubleclick enlarges most.

The previous in the series was here.  I document the conclusion of that sail here.  After the jib gets dropped, the mate secures it on the headrig.  The link in that sentence gets you to a glossary; doubleclick enlarges fotos.  At Buck’s suggestion: music by  Richard Thompson and  Bob Neuwirth.

In preparation to lower the foresail, the boom is centered and

secured.

This crewman lowers the peak halliard as

another flakes the sail.

Once the foresail is stowed, the mainsail boom is centered and secure; it too

gets flaked as it’s lowered.

Reef nettles are tucked into the flakes to maintain clearer line-of-sight for the captain.

Forward docklines are laid out.

Crew prepares to send the first stern line.

Upon command it goes toward the bitt and

get hauled in.

Ditto the first of two bow lines, and then

they get hauled in.

Once the schooner is tight and centered on the point of egress, it’s all fast.

This trip complete . . .  I’m ready for another soon.  The sixth boro awaits.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  See Bonnie’s “fishtales on fryday” here.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 944 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

June 2016
M T W T F S S
« May    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 944 other followers