You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘USACE’ category.

If you’ve forgotten why I call these exotic, it comes from a bird book I have on the shelf.  Read about it here.

RV Ridley Scott Thomas came into the sixth boro yesterday, arriving here between Driftmaster, 1949–exotic in a different way–and the light, West Bank.

Here’s my question:  where and when was Ridley Thomas built?  Answer follows.  When I saw it, I wondered whether it had just left a shipyard for the first time.

Arriving yesterday after a nine-day trip from Curaçao, she had lots of folks on deck enjoying the beautiful Saturday morning.

Click here for more info on EGS, now a Hong Kong based company, and click here for info on her fleetmates. It turns out that one of her fleetmates is RV Bold Explorer, which some years ago you saw here as an EPA vessel named Bold. How her change of ownership came to be can be extrapolated here.

 

Sloop Puffin squeezes between Driftmaster and the research vessel.  Note the flag on the ridge?  It’s flag day today, and if you’re wondering how that started, click here.  I’m a fan of #6.  There are two US flags in this photo, one at the official site Fort Wadsworth, and another as courtesy flag flying from the mast of Thomas.

As of this writing, she’s still in over in Elizabethport.

 

All photos, WVD.   I’ve no idea why she’s in town, but for more on RV Ridley Thomas, click here.

And the answer to the questions . . . she was built in Singapore in 1981, first carrying the name Western Inlet.

At 0900 and a few minutes, USNS Comfort arrived at the Narrows.  Ava M was one of six McAllister units meeting her there to assist.

USACE, NYPD, and other agencies saw her in as well.

She passed the USCG station and

 

and the old hospital complex.

Another USNS vessel in the port was Watkins.

From this point off Bayonne, we’ll pick up the story tomorrow.

All photos, WVD.

I re-learned an acronym  . . . LCTC, or large car and truck carrier.  These included the Wallenius Wilhelmsen orange ROROs with names beginning with T, like Topeka, Tortugas . . .  and so on.  The green ones are HERO type, smaller and more efficient.

She’s 755′ x 106′ and by tomorrow she could be squeezing through the original Panama Canal locks.

 

I wonder if these bow ports see water in rough seas.

 

 

All photos, WVD.

Here’s another LCTC, Torino.

And as to continuing impact of Covid-19 on jobs, here‘s info on an announcement from a few days ago of temporary layoffs of WW employees.  I’m wondering if that includes those ILA folks in port who drive the cars and trucks off these ships.

George sends me lots of photos of ports I’ve not yet visited, and they’re convincing me to expand my horizons and see some new places. More on that later.

Let’s start in San Diego with Bernardine C, aka Bernie, a unique push boat that Curtin Marine built at their own facility in Long Beach, and her certificates show her as “Hull #1”.  She was completed in 2015.  Note her winch protected under her wheelhouse.  She’s registered at 45′ x 22′ x 5′, and powered by two John Deere Tier-3 engines, rated at 1000 HP.  Full information on her and other Curtin vessels can be found here.

Next tug along is Contender, belonging to Pacific Tug Boat.  She’s a 62′ x 28′ x 8′, built in 1964 (or 69 ?) at some yard in Long Beach, possibly Jones Tug & Barge, and is rated at 1200 HP.  George writes:  “In her previous life, as Rebel II, she and a similar boat, Tuffy II (now Tommy?), took deck barges to resupply Catalina Island on a twice-daily basis. I never knew them to miss a trip due to rough weather.  When another operator took over that franchise in 2016, both tugs were picked up by Pacific Tug Boat.”

Now for some boats George reported on from the Bay area, let’s start with Raccoon, a USACE debris collector that shows a slight resemblance to her origins as a Navy Seaplane Wrecking Derrick.  George:  “Where there were zones for seaplanes to take off and land, there was a need to get the wreckage of one out of the way quickly if one crashed, so those in the air could land before they ran out of fuel. These vessels, called YSDs, or “Mary Anne’s”,  were self-propelled crane vessels to fulfill that need.  To see an example of a YSD with an aircraft on its foredeck, click here.”

Of interest, Raccoon has an updated crane and burns a quite innovative fuel made of soybeans.

Here an image of YSD-64 in the Caroline Islands taken on 5 March 1945.  On her deck is an Avenger.  Click here for another Avenger.

Let’s end with Phyllis T, one of three 50-foot steel push boats built by Inland Boat Co. of Orange Texas in 2001 commissioned by Tudor-Saliba Construction Company for the retrofitting of the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge.  She is operated by Dutra Dredging and still in use.

Many thanks to George for use of these photos from California.

 

Apologies for sitting on these photos fo so long, but today’s the day to put them up.  The previous 72 can be found here.

From Mage, long-time reader and commenter . . ..  the sailing vessel below is proclaimed as the “world’s oldest active sailing ship.”  I’d go along with that, since I can’t name one older and although I suspect someone might quibble with some of those adjectives.  Can anyone identify it based on this statement and photo?  Mage posts as frequently as I do, work that you can find here.

I haven’t posted this in a half year because I couldn’t identify the tugs.  Maybe someone can help with that.  Once you get other pieces of info, you will know the location.

From Sean, another long-time reader and commenter . . . these workboats.  From the photo and from names, can you identify the location?  Previous photos by Sean here.

Click here for fuller specs on R/V Palmetto.  Click here for a closer-up photo of USACE Evans.

I’ve seen Candice L as far south as North Carolina, but this photo comes from longtime reader and commenter, Tony.

Tony also sends along a photo of this vessel Irvington, which appears to be a small double-ended ferry.  Anyone know where it works/has worked?  Here are previous photos sent along by Tony.

And finally, here’s a subster photo from Tommy on the Clyde, the Scottish Clyde, not the upstate NY one.  Anyone identify the sub?  Previous photos by Tommy here.  Previous submarines on this blog . . . here.

Starting from the top, the sailing vessel is the 1863 Star of India. According to Tommy, the sub may be this one.   

Many thanks for these photos to Mage Bailey, Sean McQuilken, Tony A, and Tommy Bryceland.

 

 

This exact title–sans the number–goes way back to 2007 here.   The orange vessel doing surveys in 2007 has been replaced by the one below, which I’d not seen until very recently.

The USACE has several survey boats in the boro, as

does Rogers.

Alpine Ocean has been surveying the harbor and the bight for some time now . . . with R/V Shearwater, which I’ve seen as far south as Norfolk.

Shearwater is 110′ loa; clearly here you see how Dina Polaris shrinks her size, the latter has five times the number of berths.

She was in briefly and out this past weekend, so I devote more space to her.

 

 

 

And while we’re in this general group, I couldn’t pass up this vessel, which I’ve not seen.  She may be the one doing working on the WW2 tanker wreck Coimbra, 30 miles south of Shinnecock Inlet. Has anyone gotten photos of her?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wishes you all a happy may day . . .

 

 

Just for ships and figgles . . . have a glance at 155 and at 55 in this series. While we’re reconnoitering the past, here’s 5.

And here’s springtime 2019.  Might this be the last view I get of tug Viking?  Scuttlebutt’s bumped into me saying so. Her first (I believe) appearance on this blog was over 11 years ago here. She had some near twins, but none evolved quite as she did.

FB has this group I really enjoy called Freighters in the Night;  I could submit this one. Jonathan C escorts an MSC box ship out.

Liz Vinik is a former fleet mate of Viking;  I caught her yesterday entering the kills with a Cashman barge carrying barges. Click here for some photos of previous iterations of this boat.

A dark, slow-to-wake morning like yesterday provides lots of points of light.  Here Joyce D. heads out, likely for her railroad work.

Enjoy these contrasts, Linda L. Miller and Hayward, two specialized boats.

Let’s end with a transient, sporadically seen in the sixth boro, a formerly Pacific Ocean Crowley tug . . .  Morgan,  out of New Bedford.

All photos e-watermarked with invisible metadata as taken by Will Van Dorp in the past month.

 

This significant piece of floating dock was westbound in the Kills Sunday morning.   It was called in on VHF and via 911.

Even the ducks were distressed.

 

No rudder, no power, not even a captain.

It was a job for Driftmaster,

and she hauled it away.  This reminds me of junk in the harbor waters . . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

It’s the first full day of spring, which means that soon many more small craft will operate on the sixth boro, yet all winter long, many small boats never leave.

If this is a Class A 25′ SAFE Defender boat, it may have entered service in 2002.   I’ll be back with this.

Here are a team of the newer 29′ USCG vessels.

Line and boom boats, patrol boats . . . these small craft operate in the sixth boro all year round.

Ditto survey boats like this one.

Over alongside Rhea‘s stern, that’s certainly a launch from Miller’s.

I’m guessing these are 31′ SAFE boats operated by NYPD, but they’ve been running in threes of late.  They also have larger Vigor (ex-Kvichak)-built boats.

NJ State Police has a few small boats that patrol/train all year round.

NYPD has had a few of these for almost five years now.  When they first arrived, I was astonished by the speed they could make.

USACE Moritz first launched in 2001.

 

So let’s go back to that 25′ Defender in the first photo, but at closer inspection . . . see the logo on the door . . . it’s a DonJon RIB.

USCG checking me out with a long lens? . . . Nah, that’s Bjoern of New York Media Boat.  Check out their blog here, and book a tour here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s again reminded that you’ll see something new each time you go down to the water and look closely.  And in the next few months, in all waters recently ice-bound, be ready to see an influx of recreational boats coming north for the summer.

 

Long before Marvel comics and their several versions of rebirth, a crop of folk heroes existed, with stories that originated in the oral tradition, at least so it seems to me.  And was the Paul Bunyan legend based on Saginaw Joe Fournier?

No matter.  Here’s the first workboat I can recall aptly named for one.  The paint may be scuffed,

the name boards in need of rehab, but

she looks ready to break out of the ice and lift some gates.  By Great Lakes standards, she’s not even that old, it seems, launched in Muskegon in 1944.  Has she been repowered?  She’s a barge, so the power would be only for the derrick machinery.

With the Soo Locks closed now and drained, it’s possible she’s hard at work lifting gates as needed.  Click here for another another and photos about the January 2019 closure of the locks.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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