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Just for ships and figgles . . . have a glance at 155 and at 55 in this series. While we’re reconnoitering the past, here’s 5.

And here’s springtime 2019.  Might this be the last view I get of tug Viking?  Scuttlebutt’s bumped into me saying so. Her first (I believe) appearance on this blog was over 11 years ago here. She had some near twins, but none evolved quite as she did.

FB has this group I really enjoy called Freighters in the Night;  I could submit this one. Jonathan C escorts an MSC box ship out.

Liz Vinik is a former fleet mate of Viking;  I caught her yesterday entering the kills with a Cashman barge carrying barges. Click here for some photos of previous iterations of this boat.

A dark, slow-to-wake morning like yesterday provides lots of points of light.  Here Joyce D. heads out, likely for her railroad work.

Enjoy these contrasts, Linda L. Miller and Hayward, two specialized boats.

Let’s end with a transient, sporadically seen in the sixth boro, a formerly Pacific Ocean Crowley tug . . .  Morgan,  out of New Bedford.

All photos e-watermarked with invisible metadata as taken by Will Van Dorp in the past month.

 

This significant piece of floating dock was westbound in the Kills Sunday morning.   It was called in on VHF and via 911.

Even the ducks were distressed.

 

No rudder, no power, not even a captain.

It was a job for Driftmaster,

and she hauled it away.  This reminds me of junk in the harbor waters . . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

It’s the first full day of spring, which means that soon many more small craft will operate on the sixth boro, yet all winter long, many small boats never leave.

If this is a Class A 25′ SAFE Defender boat, it may have entered service in 2002.   I’ll be back with this.

Here are a team of the newer 29′ USCG vessels.

Line and boom boats, patrol boats . . . these small craft operate in the sixth boro all year round.

Ditto survey boats like this one.

Over alongside Rhea‘s stern, that’s certainly a launch from Miller’s.

I’m guessing these are 31′ SAFE boats operated by NYPD, but they’ve been running in threes of late.  They also have larger Vigor (ex-Kvichak)-built boats.

NJ State Police has a few small boats that patrol/train all year round.

NYPD has had a few of these for almost five years now.  When they first arrived, I was astonished by the speed they could make.

USACE Moritz first launched in 2001.

 

So let’s go back to that 25′ Defender in the first photo, but at closer inspection . . . see the logo on the door . . . it’s a DonJon RIB.

USCG checking me out with a long lens? . . . Nah, that’s Bjoern of New York Media Boat.  Check out their blog here, and book a tour here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s again reminded that you’ll see something new each time you go down to the water and look closely.  And in the next few months, in all waters recently ice-bound, be ready to see an influx of recreational boats coming north for the summer.

 

Long before Marvel comics and their several versions of rebirth, a crop of folk heroes existed, with stories that originated in the oral tradition, at least so it seems to me.  And was the Paul Bunyan legend based on Saginaw Joe Fournier?

No matter.  Here’s the first workboat I can recall aptly named for one.  The paint may be scuffed,

the name boards in need of rehab, but

she looks ready to break out of the ice and lift some gates.  By Great Lakes standards, she’s not even that old, it seems, launched in Muskegon in 1944.  Has she been repowered?  She’s a barge, so the power would be only for the derrick machinery.

With the Soo Locks closed now and drained, it’s possible she’s hard at work lifting gates as needed.  Click here for another another and photos about the January 2019 closure of the locks.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are previous posts in this series.  Other titles with the word hulls can be found here.

I’ve taken all these photos since the start of 2019.  The one below is a leap forward:  that’s my first view of the 1912 hull of the oft-mentioned tug I know as Grouper.  This might be the year of destiny for this 107-year-old boat, although I’ve thought that many times before. If plans are to emerge from the foundry of all possibilities, this is the time to forge them.

A decade and a half younger at 90 years young, Kentucky illustrates the draft on these tugs.

Tender #1 will also be 90 years in service this year.

Fairchild is the youngster in this set . . . launched in 1953 at Roamer Boat in Holland. MI

And finally, I don’t believe this is the 1938 Kam.  But what boat is this?  And why are those square openings in the hull just above the waterline?  And is this the Purvis scrapyard?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, in Lyons NY and the Soo.

 

Let’s take a step back now and look at the rest of the L & D at Dubuque, aka the General Zebulon Pike Lock & Dam No. 11.

I gather this red unit on the end can raise and lower the tainter gates, named for the inventor.

Posted at the lock is this set of statistics on the infrastructure.

 

Tied up at the lock is USACE tug Bettendorf.  Just over two years ago and thanks to Barrel, I posted photos of many USACE tugs and other equipment here.

Across the way in Illinois was what appeared to be a house barge.

Caretakers or friends of (or both) L & D No. 11 have made the best bird houses!!

 

 

Public service signage was impressive also.

The mosey was not leisurely, but it whetted my appetite to get back for a trip along the Mississippi.  All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who will soon go into planning mode.

 

Who even knew such a vessel as Integrity existed?  I can imagine all manner of things they dive for.  Here’s more info on requirements and job description.

Unrelated, the East River gets shut down sometimes if high profile traffic travels through the heliport.  One such event happened about a week ago.   Here besides two (of five) Gladding Hearn NYPD boats in the distance is FDNY’s Feehan, all asset in the sixth boro for under 10 years years now. Here and here are photos of Feehan— a FireStorm 70— before she ever arrived in the sixth boro.

I can’t tell you anything about State Trooper URT-7  (underwater recovery team??), but it looks legit.

USACE locally has a set of these small boats boats, which I believe do bathymetric surveys. It’s instructive to see this list of USACE missions.  In the distance, one of NYPD’s 55′ patrol boats can be seen.

The blue/yellow logo marks the NJ State Police . . .

here traveling in twos.

Sentinel II was hauled out when I last traversed the Troy lock in October,

but in summer 2016 I caught her just south of Albany serving as a push boat. 

And in closing, here’s a photo I took summer 2016, but so far as I can tell, I’ve never posted it, until now.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’m always happy to put up others’ photos. Cell phone shots, though, don’t display well on a larger screen.  If you’ve sent a photo that I’ve not yet used, I’m working on it.

First, from Phil Gilson .  .  Driftmaster is retrieving a car that plunged off the fishing pier in Bay Ridge earlier last week.   Driftmaster‘s fleet mate Hayward sometimes gets drawn into such recoveries also, as is shown here.  And from tugster, here’s more fishing of this sort.

These are the folks who locate and investigate below the surface,

although it might be possible to use tools on Hocking as well.

Here’s a repost of a hypothetical map of my neighborhood assuming a sea level rise of 100′.  Here are additional hypothetical, less extreme maps.

And finally, from Glenn Raymo, enjoy these photos of the Science Barge The Judy being moved upriver for winter.

 

Moving the barge is Fred Johannsen, previously appearing on this blog among other times here, when it had, in my opinion, a less attractive paint scheme.

Thanks to  Phil, Jeffrey, and Glenn for use of these photos.

 

Contining here, I am, from Detroit to Cleveland.

Demolen at the USACE dock near the Rouge,

Stormont pushing the ferry barge

in the direction of RenCen,

Victory moving James L. Kuber

past Fighting Island, and

Leonard M remakes the tow

that’s heaped up with coal,

and I get to watch it all.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

The wheel should be a giveaway for location.  More on that later in the post.

I’ve not found much info on the delightfully-blue ST called “The Commissioner,” other than a photo of it breaking ice in Burnham Harbor.

Kenosha, nearby, launched in 1954 in Missouri.

 

Kenosha pushes the crane barge out to a breakwater.

Now standing with my back to the wheel and looking north, it’s 1981 built Valerie B, 

a 1981 tug owned by Kokosing.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders why US entities get their ferris wheels from foreign companies.  The Centennial Wheel is Dutch Wheels Model DW60.

Here’s more on Ferris,  his wheel, and a large power wheel used in an iron ore operation along the Hudson River.  Yes, that Hudson.

 

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