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I’m posting from Montreal, the M in the series title MB.  So I’ve  some catching-up to do.

Let’s start in a waterway where deckhands have an additional task, one involving hand signals.

I commend the deckhands for their polite signals given the crowding.

All proceeds with minimal horn blasts and absence of injury.

 

Some hand signaling has to be repeated though. Have you guessed the town, the waterway?

It’s Cleveland of course with its much-loved Cuyahoga.

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

To repeat what I said yesterday, this was supposed to be a visit to get photos of tugs and ships in ice.  The Cuyahoga may be quite cold, but no ice . . . .

This shot is taken from the Carter Road Bridge looking toward Collision Bend and the bug venues.

Under the Rte 2 Bridge, Alpena awaits her 76th season!  She makes me feel young!

In resplendent light last summer late, I caught her heading northbound mid-Lake Huron.

Again, I imagined ice;  two weeks earlier and I likely would have seen it.

The yellow of the water makes more vivid the yellow of her hull.

Some crew is maintaining boiler pressure.

And when the season begins, Alpena will back out of this dock on the old river, turn to port and head back to work for her 76th season.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who looks forward to seeing her steaming on the Lakes again this summer.

Previous Cleveland posts on tugster include this and this with laker Buffalo,  and this with–among other things–Iowa towing Sea Eagle II up the Cuyahoga.   There are others also if you just use the search window.

 

I’m back near the sixth boro now and have photos for at least through early October, at which time I leave on another gallivant.

So here’s step one in catching up.  Up the meandering Cuyahoga, here are Iowa (1915) and Oklahoma (1913);  these boats were built to work and last.

 

The vintage GL tugs may just be replaced for the next century by this design:  Cleveland, launched less than six months ago . . . 2017.

Click here for a recent article on Cleveland.

Cleveland in this series was doing assist for 610′ x 78′ sand barge Ashtabula powered by 142′ tug Defiance

Here’s Elizabeth Anna in the Lake Erie port on Erie PA.

Elizabeth Anna (ex-Bear) last appeared on this blog here.

In the entrance to the old Buffalo River, here’s Daniel Joncaire II, a NYPA tug

launched in late 2015 by Great Lakes Shipyard in Cleveland. NYPA uses the tug for ice boom installations near its hydropower units on the Niagara River. I’m curious now about Niagara Queen II and William H. Latham

I’ve always had misgivings about my series title “freshwater tugs” and here’s a good illustration why:  Calusa Coast–here with Kirby barge Delaware–was until a few years ago a regular in the saltwater and brackish , in and out of the sixth boro.   Here she is in the Niagara River headed for Black Rock.

Beyond her stern here is the combination Buffalo Intake Crib Lighthouse. 

And to close out today’s post, it’s Sarah Andrie, another tug that’s made the transition from saltwater to fresh . . . the former Caribe Service.

She’s making her way here upstream into Lake Erie from the Welland Canal.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Click here for previous posts in this series.  I add these now in response to a reader who says  . . .”but we have ship assist and harbor tugs in the Great Lakes as well.”  And the most iconic of those are the GL tugs, an old fleet that has been not only maintained but also updated.

Here are ones I’ve photographed this month.  Vermont dates from 1914 and Washington from 1925, and they are still on the duty roster.

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These first two photos were taken in Buffalo, said to once have been the 3rd busiest port in the world.

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In the port of Cleveland, much remediated from when the river burned most conspicuously,

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Iowa, dating from 1915, towed Sea Eagle II up river.

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Nebraska, 1929, was coming through a very busy railroad bridge here on the Maumee in Toledo.

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Mississippi dates from 1916.

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Idaho, 1931 and  the last of this series to be built, was behind this fence in Detroit on the Rouge River.

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In previous years, I’ve posted many times about a GL tug stranded in the Erie Canal.

Not all the GL tugs have this profile.  For example there are some converted YTBs like Erie and Huron.  And recently, tugs that were previously only in saltwater have made their ways to the Inland Seas.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s the reference map;  leg 9 took us into Cleveland, where Federal Maas is in port.

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William C. Gaynor was anchored on the west side of the Cuyahoga.

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Eagle pushed a deck barge outbound.

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A small boat analyzed the river, and

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Iowa went by light.

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A visit to William G. Mather was compulsory, of course.

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I noticed where her anchor was cast.

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And finally, Iowa towed in Alberta-registered Sea Eagle II moving St. Mary’s Cement II.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has since moved on to leg 10.

 

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