You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Frederick E. Bouchard’ tag.

July 2009 she looked like this . . .

June 2016 like this . . .

And in August 2021 . . .  she looks like this.  Welcome Mary Emma.  Congratulations to the new owners, recognizable by the tan/green colors.

And transformation I missed was Evening Mist, who recently got a new logo on her stacks and traveled

to Belfast, Maine.  No doubt more Bouchard boats will be transforming soon.

More paint-overs of this fleet to follow.  Others I missed have been Capt. Fred, now registered in California and Linda Lee, operating for a Texas concern.

And speaking of transformations, the first cruise ship since February 2020 came into port this morning . . .  with more to come.

Here are previous installments.  What’s different here is that in this case I’m inside  the Narrows and shooting to the east and north.

Yankee passes in light before sunrise.

I rotate the lens 90 degrees to the right and Margaret stands by

along with James D to support Maersk Chicago, anchored in Stapleton.  As I write this,  24 hours later, the container ship is leaving port, although her destination shows NYC as both “from” and “to”….

Meanwhile Mary Turecamo comes out of its base in the KVK

just as the sun rises above the horizon and its cloudbank and gets reflected.

All photos, WVD, who thinks this set perfectly illustrates why I take photos at dawn whenever I can.  It’s worth getting up and out.

Megalopolis roadways see dense traffic, and so do waterways in these areas.  I hope these photos convey a sense of that.  All but two of the seven vessels are underway.  Underway vessels, l to r, are Frederick E. Bouchard, MSC Athens, Jonathan C. Moran, C. F. Campbell, and Fort McHenry.

Dense means tight quarters, Brian Nicholas looking barely larger than the bulbous bow.

Here everything is in motion.

Again, everything here is in motion.  I’m not sure what the Reinauer units there are.

All are moving here too . .   Frederick E., Pegasus, Meaghan Marie, one of the Moran 6000s, Mister T, a bit of the bow of Mary Turecamo, and CMA CGM Nabucco.

 

Sometimes a confluence of schedules make the KVK resemble rush hour.  Photos, WVD.

I’m always on the lookout for “first-timers” in the harbor, but I’m equally thrilled to see the “seldom-seen.”  I realize that some people might see these boats everyday. The “seldom-seen” relates to me.

This is true of Pelham.  The 1960 built is on her sixth name, if I count right.  She started out as Esso Pelham.  You’ll have to scroll, but here are a number of times I’ve posted photos of her, in and out of the water.

Evelyn Cutler, a 1973 build,  is a frequenter on this site.  When I first saw her, she was a Great Lakes Dock and Dredge boat called Melvin E. Lemmerhirt.

In the few months that this boat has been know as Mackenzie Rose, she appears to stay quite busy.  That’s a good thing.

Rae also fits into the rarely seen list, although maybe she was laid up and is now busy again.  Meeting her here is Normandy. Rae and Normandy were built in 1952  and 2007, respectively.

Philadelphia and

Jacksonville are both recent 4200 hp Vane boats.  Jacksonville, 2018, is one year newer than Philadelphia.

I first saw the 1981 Genesis Victory as Huron Service.  Periodically, some of the Genesis boats do make their way into Lake Huron and beyond.

As i said earlier, Mackenzie Rose is quite busy.  Does anyone know her namesake?  I don’t.

Frederick E. Bouchard is the second boat to carry that name.  She was built in 2016 and operates with 6140 hp, but

these days she looks quite light and her exposed waterline somewhat rusty.

Barney Turecamo, the fourth (?) boat to carry that name, brings 5100 hp to the job.  When she was built in 1995, she had a different upper wheelhouse.

All photos, WVD, and taken in the past month.

 

Enjoy the photos.  Can you guess which of these tugboats is oldest?

Greetings Rae and hello to the crewman at the railing. It’s been awhile since I’ve seen Rae.  The first time I saw her I was with Bonnie and the tug was then called Miss Bonnie.

Several people have said Matthew Tibbetts is the best looking tug in the harbor.  Who am I to argue with them about that?

Pathfinder cuts a sharp image as it leans into its empty trash containers . . . . and the barge CVA-601.

Some mornings the dawn light enhances everything.  Because I was a NASA fan a long time ago, a tug named Cape Canaveral will always get my attention.  I’m guessing she may be the newest boat among these.

Above, along the left side of the photo, see the barge with GL 54 on it?  Ocean Tower was moving it along,as below.

This light perfectly complements Sarah D‘s lines and colors.

The sun is already rising well after 0600;  I took this photo of Ruby M before 0600.

A very light Frederick E. Bouchard passed me by the other day.

Normandy has the throatiest sound of the boats I know best.

And finally,  well before 0600, Emily Ann was moving a scrap (?) barge westbound.  I believe she was last on this blog back in June.

All photos, WVD.

Oh . . . the oldest?  That would be Rae, launched 1952, same as me.

Barges “1” was years ago.  And here are previous posts that in some way focus on some sort of barge.  But the two photos below, which I took in May, prompt this post.  I can’t identify this Bouchard barge, but look at the size of the yard worker in comparison.

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It’s quite likely this is not one of their largest barges, but it is indeed sizable.

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The B. No. 260 is 350′ loa and slightly different design although a similar deep notch.

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The B. No. 220 is 404′ –here along with Normandy and Bouchard Boys–and

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B. No. 280 is 399′.  I’m not sure which tug is driving it.

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Frederick Bouchard here is powering B. No. 264–350′–

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Evening Tide with B. No. 262--350′– and

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the 317′ loa B. No. 250, pushed by Evening Star.  My point was how large and capacious these barges are . . . ,

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and that is measured in barrels of capacity, not feet.  For these barges then, here’s that info:

B. No. 250                    = 59,000 brls

B. No. 260, 262, 264  =  60,000

B. No. 280                    =  80,000

B. No. 220                     = 110,000 brl

 

In many situations, fuel is measured in metric tons, as covered here.

And this tangent started out with photos taken by Will Van Dorp.

I will be back tomorrow with close-ups of L’Hermione and more, but Bjoern of New York Media Boat sent me the very intriguing photo below.  Recognize it?  Answer follows.  Clue:  Elizabeth Anna.

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Well, L’Hermione  (pronounced LAIR me un) will find her way into more of these photos.  Here’s the venerable W. O. Decker.  Click and scroll to see her at work a few decades back.

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It’s Pelham, power unit for Wavertree not long ago.

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And it’s James Turecamo, preparing to escort in the French frigate currently at South Street.

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And Frederick E. Bouchard, in the process of switching B. No. 264 from on the hawser to alongside.

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And my first shot of James E. Brown, brand spanking new.  I’ll devote a whole post to James E. soon, I hope.

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Laura K. Moran watches the French lion pass . . .

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as does Frances out in Gravesend Bay.

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And the answer to the question about Elizabeth Anna . . . the top photo . . . I believe it’s the erstwhile Bear, the Disch tug acquired by DonJon at an auction back in December 2014.  I wonder where she’s headed.  Anyone help out?

Except the top photo by Bjoern Kils, all photos in the past few days by Will Van Dorp.

And if I haven’t said this explicitly enough, New York Media Boat is the faster, most versatile, shallowest draft means to see whatever you want in the sixth boro.  Need waterborne support for a project or  . . .want to see or show someone the sixth boro and its borders with the other boros, check them out.

Here was post #1 of what could become a series from over five years ago.

Dusk rarely finds me at my places along Richmond Terrace, but last night I was here with elizabeth, and she took a pic much like this one, and when she sent it to FB with the question “Guess who my dinner date is?” one friend wrote back . . .  “the great Gatsby?”  So call this  . . . what the great Gatsby sees as tugster on a short day’s journey into night, apologies to Mr O’neill.

Barney Turecamo passes Gatsby’s place, as do

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Frederick E. Bouchard and B. No. 210,

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Ellen McAllister,

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Fidelio,

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Dorothy J,

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Blue Fin,

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and Weddell Sea.  

Gatsby’s for the night . . . was actually Blue–formerly known as R. H. Tugs.  From Blue, it was a short walk to Sailors Snug Harbor for the 25th annual John A. Noble Art Auction.   And I’m very pleased to say that

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a print of my foto below brought $500 into the museum’s funds for restoration of Robbins Reef Light, and the framed foto went home with a very happy friend.  To see the other 49 items in the auction catalog, click here.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

I made my way to the Kills looking for the wayward Ilya, and several times a surfacing cormorant startled me, but alas.  Except for knowing that the origin is Carib, I’d make a lame joke that Ilya should be called a woman-atee rather than a man-atee.  OK, I’m sure it’s been done.  Anyhow, instead, believe it or not, I spotted a motley group of tugs, ships, and boats.  I’ll start with the tugs, both ones I saw and others I remembered.

Bismarck Sea ex-John H. Malik (who was he?) and ex-Gulf Ruler, built 1976.  Notice the oval on the stack awaiting a K-Sea logo.

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Remember the color scheme?  It’s John H. Malik, foto taken winter 2007 in the sixth boro.  Malik was a “founding Roehrig employee who helped to guide and grow the company until he passed away in 2001.”

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Here’s that Roehrig color scheme on Eileen M Roehrig, now North Sea, built 1982 and pictured a week and a half back here.

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Herbert P Brake . . . built 1992 of recycled steel by Bart Brake.  Anyone tell more about the evolution of this tug?

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Foto by Jed of Michigan Service, ex-Kevin Candies, 1981. I love those Gowanus Bay gravel piles in the distance.

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Frederick E Bouchard, 1975.

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Atlantic Coast, 2007!

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Adriatic Sea, ex-Diplomat, 1978.

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Linda Moran, 2009

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All fotos but the two Roehrig boats taken in the past week.

Michigan Service by Jed;  all others by Tugster.  Some info thanks to Harold Tartell.

Yup . . . close up of a stack;  nope . . . this isn’t only about stacks although I do think Evening Tide has a classy one.

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In the foreground here, barge Evening Breeze rides alongside Morton S Bouchard II.  Serious question:  what does Evening Breeze sometimes referred to a “vacuum vessel” transport, what services does it perform?

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Barbara E. Bouchard, long, low, and sleek.  For scale, notice the crewman alongside the house just forward of the winch.

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Jane A. Bouchard with Amy C. McAllister background left and New Jersey Responder, background right.  New Jersey Responder is MSRC equipment based in Perth Amboy.

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Bouchard Girls . . . haven’t noticed it around in a bit.

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Ralph E. Bouchard.

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Frederick E.

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And once again, different day, Evening Breeze this time escorted by Evening Mist.

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Before you check the answers here, can you guess which Bouchard tug has lowest and highest horsepower rating of those depicted?  The highest rating of the fleet goes to Danielle M. , depicted here last winter.

All fotos . . . Will Van Dorp.

For a reminder on the hazards of the trade, see this blogpost about the 2003 explosion.

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