You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Fort McHenry’ tag.

Megalopolis roadways see dense traffic, and so do waterways in these areas.  I hope these photos convey a sense of that.  All but two of the seven vessels are underway.  Underway vessels, l to r, are Frederick E. Bouchard, MSC Athens, Jonathan C. Moran, C. F. Campbell, and Fort McHenry.

Dense means tight quarters, Brian Nicholas looking barely larger than the bulbous bow.

Here everything is in motion.

Again, everything here is in motion.  I’m not sure what the Reinauer units there are.

All are moving here too . .   Frederick E., Pegasus, Meaghan Marie, one of the Moran 6000s, Mister T, a bit of the bow of Mary Turecamo, and CMA CGM Nabucco.

 

Sometimes a confluence of schedules make the KVK resemble rush hour.  Photos, WVD.

Having seen the forecast for December 25, I did my watch on Christmas eve.    These are the latest sunrises of the entire cycle . . . photo taken around 0745, and the sky was still reddish and offering very little light.   Fort McHenry and survey boat Christina cross. Yes, Christina . . . namesake you know who. 

Diane B was pushing John Blanche deep in the water with heating fuel.

Fort McHenry passes my station.

Ocean Endeavour was heading in ahead of the strong winds . . . or maybe just to be at the dock for Christmas.   Note the Staten Island ferry off her starboard and a tip of Twin Tube off port stern.

 

By now, it’s a little after 0800.

Twin Tube is the ultimate sixth boro Christmas boat;  there’s no Santa or reindeer, just a competent captain and enough horsepower to get alongside ships.

The reindeer . . . they’re atop the tarped salt pile.   Santa may have abandoned the sleigh, however.

All the above photos were taken before 0900.  The photo below. . .  it’s W. O. Decker, currently getting work done upriver, but ensconced between Wavertree and  work barge Progress a few years ago . .  .

All photos, WVD, who wishes you all Merry Christmas and gifts of life, health, and happiness however you find it.  And one more . .  . bravo to the Normandy crew for the decorations.

Quick . . . name those units?

Type Vane Brothers into the search window, presuming you know these are Vane Brothers boats, and you’d get all the previous instances of this title, going back to 2009.

Now you can see the names . . . Potomac above and Fort McHenry below.

Philadelphia is legible here, as is

Kings Point.

On a related note, I’ve been doing some blog maintenance;  I finally added tags to the first three and a half years of this blog.  Tags?  You can find them in the “fine print” just below the title.  When I started the blog back in November 2006, I had enough to do just remembering the process of getting images and text on the page.  So until April 2010, I just skipped tags.  Their addition matters because now–if you want–you can efficiently trace all instances of a certain vessel appearing here.  For example, the first time I saw any Vane Brothers boat in the sixth boro was at the 2007 tugboat race;  it was Patapsco.  If you want to locate all the photos I’ve posted–and now tagged–type Patapsco into the search window, find it in the tags, click that tag, and voila . . . you can go all the way back to the first one.

The system is not fool proof because Patapsco, the word, might refer to the river and watershed also. It refers to any other vessel by that name as well. For example, if you type in Pegasus, you get both the 1907 tug and the 2006 boat.  However, with tags undated, you get more of the older images than previously.  Similarly, Philadelphia may refer to the boat above or the city; type that in the search window, and you’d get both.

And if I neglected to tag something in posts more recent than April 2010, it’ll be harder to find. If I made a mistake, you’d be given my mistaken info . . . GIGO.  Those caveats given, searching is now a bit easier than it was.

All photos, WVD.

 

I sometimes refer to a golden hour, but recently I heard someone talk about the “blue” hour, when the sun is still or already below the horizon.  The light is dramatic in both, or through that whole continuum, as seen here.

Fort McHenry heads east . . .

as does Amy Moran, who technically is moving later than the blue to gold but still enjoys the subdued light.

RTC 80 is pushed westbound by

Dace Reinauer.

Treasure Coast waits with its barge amidst the industrial landscape of IMTT.

Viking (sometimes pronounced “vikin“) moves toward the AK with DBL 134.

Buchanan 12 heads for the fuel dock.

Ruth M. Reinauer  takes her barge to the AK as well.

Evelyn Cutler moves her barge to the west, and

fleet mate Kimberly Poling crosses the strait to tie up at Caddells.

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Sheesh . . . someone forgot to sweep all the leftover letters from the garage floor after work.

 

All photos and lack of sweeping by Will Van Dorp.

 

I think of ROROs like Dignity Ace as being fairly large, but this juxtaposition made me re-evaluate.

So let’s let the tape tell its tale:  three vessels here are (l to r) Anthem of the Seas, YM Utmost, and Dignity Ace with respect to their length and breadth; and I realize that the photo does nothing to show loa.  It comes out as 1141′ x 162′  v.  1099′ x 140′ v.  656′ x 106.’

The two Vane tugs are 90′ x 32,’  although I know it’s Fort McHenry alongside Anthem and cannot identify the tug alongside Dignity.

I’m guessing the fishing boat anchored here is about 20′ and

Franklin Reinauer is 81′ x 27.9 . . . .

And since we’re doing numbers . . . from the “globe” atop the “sky arm” to the water . . . that’s 300.’

That puts some perspective on scale of some sixth boro traffic.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And then it was a sunny but cold day, the coldest so far in the sixth boro.  ut the light was great.

B.Franklin Reinauer headed for the fuel stop,

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followed by a group that included

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Zachery Reinauer,

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Arabian Sea,

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and Doubleskin 40 pushed by a mostly self-effacing Fort McHenry.  

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Later Tarpon raced past, as

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did Mister T and

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Chesapeake moved her barge eastward.

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Out in Gravesend Bay, Ruth M. Reinauer and Linda Lee Bouchard swung on the hook.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Margot nears Troy with the Lockwood Bros barge from back in October. Watch the variety of backgrounds in this post, too.

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Jay Michael a few days ago passes by Con Hook.

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Amy C McAllister rounds the southern tip of Manhattan towing a capacious cargo barge Columbia Baltimore, capable of carrying 690 tees..

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Betty D light crosses the Upper Bay.   I didn’t say “Betty Delight,”  but the possibility for misunderstanding is there.

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Brendan Turecamo escorts Tammo inbound from the island of Jamaica.

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Fort McHenry waits over by IMTT.

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Sarah D pushes in some upstate rock.

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Fells Point crosses the Upper Bay bound for the Kills.

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And to finish with a photo from September, it’s Rae, standing by for the move of Wavertree.

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All photos by will Van Dorp.

 

 

You’d have thought I use this title more often, but it’s been almost three years since it last appeared. I’m starting with this photo of the lightship WLV-612, because this is where I’ll be this evening for a FREE and open-to-the-public 6 pm showing of our documentary Graves of Arthur Kill.  Seats for those who arrive first.

Over the years I’ve done many posts about the WLV-612, but my favorite is this one.

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Here’s a very recent arrival in the sixth boro’s pool of workboats . . . Fort McHenry, just off the ways, although just yesterday an even-more recent arrival.  more on that one soon, I hope.  I don’t know how new Double Skin 315 is.

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Ships in the anchorage and waterways must think they are in a tropical clime, given the temperatures of August 2016.

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NS Parade, Iron Point, MTM St Jean …  have all been here recently.

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Robert E. McAllister returned from a job, possibly having assisted Robert E. Peary.

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MSC Lucy headed out past

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Larry J. Hebert, standing by at a maintenance dredging job.

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MOL Bellwether, all 1105′ loa of her, leave into the humid haze, existing here along with

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some wind to propel this sloop.

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Finally, just the name, sir;  No need for the entire genealogy. This photo comes compliments of Bob Dahringer.

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Thanks to Bob for the photo above;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

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