You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Normandy’ tag.

Lightning is here and has been for at least four years, and Thunder is on its way.

From 2014 and therefore two years newer than Lightning, Adeline Marie, previously Denise A. Bouchard, was heading over to the Industry Day on Wednesday. I caught a few photos of her as Rubia in between her original and her latest livery. 

The 2006 Kristin Poling first came to the sixth boro as the 5000 hp 111′ x 36′ Chesapeake.   Here was my first good view of her as a Poling/Cutler tugboat.

Atlantic Enterprise has been keeping busy with runs with dredge spoils from the North River passenger terminal out to the dump site aka HARS.   For a day’s worth of reading, click here for a July 2022 report on HARS. 

The 1981 Susan Miller pushes a small deck barge through congested waters here. She’s been working in the boro for as long as I’ve been doing this blog. 

The 1968 Marie J. Turecamo has worked in the Moran livery for over 20 years. 

Scale is clear from this side-by-side photo of the 2007 Saint Emilion (105′ x 38′ and 4800 hp) and the 1982 McCormack Boys ( 74′ x 26′ and 1200 hp), both hauled out over at Bayonne Dry Dock. 

The 2007 Normandy (79′ x 27′ and 1900 hp) has been in the boro since 2015. 

The 1981 Navigator (64′ x 24′ and 1200 hp)  has to be one among the busiest boats in the harbor and the region.

The 1975 Mary Emma (100′ x 31′ and 3900 hp) has worked under this livery since 2021.  I caught her transformation here about a year ago. 

All photos and any errors, WVD, who thanks you for continuing to read this blog. 

In part 1, Treasure Coast slowly made her way to mid KVK, and I thought it was to get fuel, but it was soon apparent that she was there for an assist, to help ATB Galveston and Petrochem Producer to get off the dock.

The scale of Galveston is apparent from the workboat;  the tug is 144′ x 46′.

She’s slightly larger than Lynne M. Rose, and works with a total of 12,000 hp.

My vantage point has not changed here, so the movement here derives from the ATB powering astern.

Notice just to the left to the mooring line spools . . .

Normandy is the second assist tug.

Once the ATB is pointed east, the assist tugs back off.

 

 

 

Treasure Coast follows the ATB toward the Upper Bay.

As of posting, ATB Galveston/Petrochem Producer are off Palm Beach on their way to western Louisiana.

All photos, WVD, who has just confirmed a return to the bayous of western LA myself next week.

Unrelated:  If you’ve always dreamed of owning a tugboat yacht, here‘s one that popped into my feed just before post time.  Below are two photos I took of the same tugboat, Shenandoah, in Waterford on September 13, 2009.

Tug44 was a friend of the Buffalo-based owners at that time, Baltimore registry notwithstanding.

 

Gray day, gray water, gray sky, gray bridge, grayish black barge, gray upper wheelhouse . . . .  I just had to saturate that patch of bluish cloud.

I’d seen Susan Rose on AIS with Normandy as escort, and I figured that meant she was pushing a barge, a loaded barge.

You can see where the old identification has been painted out.   RCM must be Rose Cay Marine . . . ?

 

The yellow patch “under” the ladder really pops.

 

And she’s headed upriver. 

All photos, WVD, who has a busy week ahead.

By the way, my first photos of this boat appeared here in 2019.

 

A quick post today, since I’ll spend most of the day without computer, signal, or free time.  The varied and unsettled weather of the recent weeks is evident here as well, the diverse days of summer.

Here are some of the usual workhorses or work oxen of the port.

Brendan Turecamo, 

Normandy, and

Evening Breeze and a couple Bouchard barges.  There must be a shortage of locations to stack the idle Bouchard fleet, still in limbo no matter what engrossing negotiation is happening behind closed doors in advance of July 23, according to this article. 

Continuing with this threat, there’s Normandy and Pelham,

Fells Point, 

Justine McAllister,

Marjorie McAllister with Bulkmaster

Sea Lion and a sailboat under sail, 

Brendan Turecamo

Kirby Moran and Miriam Moran, 

Miriam and a fishing skiff, 

and Kirby, James D., and Miriam, all Moran, and all following an incoming ship. 

More soon . . . WVD.

 

Because the name and focus of this blog is tugster, you’d expect to see a lot of tugboats, both within the confines of New York harbor, aka the REAL sixth boro, and I hope you are satisfied that you find a plethora of tugboats in installments of this blog.  So here’s Random Tugs #337, post 4877, and the tugboat is Foxy 3 moving an aggregate scow.

In the foreground, it’s Crystal Cutler;  off in the distance it’s Normandy.

Diane B here heads east with a cargo in John Blanche.  I did an article on this unit some years back.

Joyce D. Brown pushes an empty scow east.  Notice anything on the scow that identifies it?  See the end of this post.

James E. Brown passed sister Joyce D. that morning in the Kills.

Franklin Reinauer that morning may or may not have been under control of the author of a tugboat captain who shared his tales a few years back.  I will stay mum. Off to the left, that’s Capt. Brian A. McAllister.

HMS Liberty muscled a barge full of bunkers to deliver to a thirsty ship over in New Jersey.

Centerline operates both Liberty above and HMS Justice below.

Susan Miller moves some material and equipment over to the project just west of the St. George ferry terminal.

Brendan Turecamo heads over to the next and the next and the next job.

Bruce A. McAllister assists a container ship into port.

Bergen Point came off the ways at Blount Shipbuilding way back in 1958.

So that scow Joyce was pushing above is called Maria and

this logo says it was once in the Disch fleet, now sold off in many directions.

All photos, WVD.

Solo and over along the Connecticut shore last week, it’s Joker, with her distinctive lines and livery.

The other dawn, Ava M. was returning from a job.  It was sunny and clear, but with all the rain of the previous day, lots of moisture remained in the air.

Taken an hour or so later, Eastern Dawn passes those same hoses and that ship, Chem Neon.

The top photo here was of a single vessel;  the next two had two each.  Beyond Christian Reinauer are two tugs and a ship to the left, and one tug to the right.

Normandy is front and center, but I count two tugs, a tanker, and a tank barge in the background.

Ditto here:  the seldom-seen (by me)  Christine M. McAllister with lots of activity in the background.

See what all is happening here:  in the foreground l to r, Kirby Moran, Treasure Coast, Miriam Moran, Sarah Ann, and Marjorie B. McAllister.  In addition, there are two tankers and a cement barge.

All photos, WVD.

And since I’ve not seen Christine M underway in quite a while, enjoy another shot below.  I count at least four vessels beyond her.

Excuse the obscure word; it’s not one I regularly use, but concatenation, i.e., a series of interconnected things or events, random and unlikely ever to recur, came to mind as I put together this set of photos.  Follow along.  Early one morning recently, Kristin Poling made up to a loaded Eva Leigh Cutler,

and Normandy came to assist.

They eased out of the slip and turned to the west and

passed the moored crude tanker SKS Jersey.

Behind them came Bruce A. McAllister.

 

From the turn at Bergen Point, there appeared one of the Moran 6000s with Mandalay, a 2345 teu container ship launched in 2019.

Mandalay evokes much… all the way back to here.

She generally makes stops along the coast of North America and South America, hitting a port or two in the Caribbean.

As she passed between my vantage point and SKS Mersey, Morgan Reinauer heads west.

As of this posting, Mandalay, with her evocative name, is in Savannah.

All photos and perception, WVD, who has more concatenations to come.

Mornings on the KVK can be busy.

Above, Sea Fox (1971) follows Barney Turecamo (1995), and below, Kimberly Poling (1994) is followed by Mary H (1981)

Kimberly Turecamo (1980) and Marjorie A. McAllister (1974) head east to escort different incoming ships.

Chesapeake Coast (2012) assists Gulf Coast (1982) moving the cement barge out into the current.

Bruce A. (1974) and Patrice McAllister (1999) hasten out for work.

Thomas A. Witte (1961 when she was called Valoil) returns to Port Newark.

Joyce D. (2002) passes the docked Normandy (2007).

And Cape Canaveral (2019) makes for her yard.

All this and much more during a few hours one bright, mild morning recently by WVD.  Any errors, my blame.

How about a random sample, as the title says.  Afrodite, launched 2005, and dwt of 53k.  I believe that was Normandy arriving. 

Usma, not US Military Academy because that’s at West Point NY, but a 2007 tanker with a dwt of 53k.

Seameridian, 2001 and right around 50k.

Seaenvoy, same fleet as Meridian, but launched 2017 and 113k dwt.

 

In this twofer, we have Elandra Willow in the distance, a 2019 launch and 50k capacity, and MTM Santos, 2013 and 22k.

Navig8 Guard was launched in 2019 and capacity around 50k.

The “extra-large” stack houses its scrubber technology.

The oldster of the group is Bow Flora, 1998 and 37k.

She’s an Odfjell tanker. 

Lumen N, assisted by Brendan Turecamo, is 2008 and 65k.

 

And rounding out this post, with pirate-preventing guards on the rails,

it’s BW Kallang, of the huge BW fleet.

All photos, WVD.

That more tankers and fuel barges arrive in the sixth boro in the colder months is just my hunch;  maybe someone reading this can supply numbers to prove or disprove this.  It would make sense, given that there’s the need for heating.  In any case, let’s look at some vessels in town in recent months.  By the way, here was the first post of this series.   One of these is arguably misclassified here;  see if you can determine which.

Afrodite was a frequent and controversial visitor here a few years back.

 

Note the person climbing the ladder from a Millers Launch launch.  Also, can you explain the T on the bow?

Overseas Mykonos, despite its name,

is a US-flagged vessel, assisted by Mary Turecamo. However, when launched in 2010, she was registered in Majuro.  I have to admit that I need a “big picture tutorial” on shifting ship registries, aka reflagging.

In the morning light as thousands of cars make their way (upper left) along the arteries called parkways and expressways, Grand Ace9, launched in 2008,  has been here before–never on this blog though, as Eagle Miri.  I’ve not seen Eagle tankers in the harbor in years . . . possibly some of the older ones have been scrapped.

 

Maya, like Afrodite, is a TEN tanker, “TEN” expands to Tsakos Energy Navigation. See the T on the stack? Maya is of a smaller class of TEN tankers, and has switched registry from Maltese to Marshall Islands.

Orange Ocean is a regular in the port, and the only Liberian tanker in this batch.

Seapike has been here before.  For full context of this vessel, check Michael Schmidt’s site here . . . for Seabass, Seacod, Seatrout, etc. . . you get this gist. Also, note a Millers  Launch launch, maybe Emily, along the port side.

The green stripes near the bow mark this as a BW Group vessel, one of many that call in the sixth boro.

One series has names like BW Panther, BW Puma, BW Bobcat . . . you get the idea.  The founder of the company was Sir Yue-Kong Pao, who started in the family shoe business.  Although you’ve likely never heard of him, he made Newsweek’s cover in 1976.  The company is currently run by the founder’s son-in-law Peter Woo, who was on Forbes cover a few years ago. 

Rounding this post out, shown in the breadth of the Upper Bay, it’s Aegean Star.

She’s the newest of vessels in this post, launched in 2019.

All photos and research, WVD.

And if you said that Orange Ocean was misplaced here, you’d be right, since the liquid she carries is edible . . . or potable.

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