You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Normandy’ tag.

I’m guessing Eric R Thornton is off in search of some scrap waiting in

the Bronx maybe?

It’s been a long while since I’ve seen Penn No. 6, and here she and Normandy are made up to Penn No. 121.  See those four shore cranes against the sky?  Here’s a post I did on them almost a decade ago.

 

Here’s B. No. 250 eastbound for the Sound, with

Evening Star in the notch.

Some people would be pleased with this juxtaposition: MTA’s Highbridge Yard, with Harbor II, MetroNorth, and the 44th Precinct Police Station!

Barbara Ann holds station at the University Heights Bridge, with the unmistakeable Hall of Fame for Great Americans dome over the treeline.  That’s a place I’ve yet to visit, one of many places in the five boros.

Ditto . . . Ireland on the north side of that bridge.

 

And to conclude for another day . . . it’s Penn No. 91 with

Skipjack in the notch.

Oops!  All photos by Will Van Dorp . . . from aboard Manhattan II.

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I see this tug light so infrequently that I didn’t recognize her at first.  A clue . . . some years ago she was painted red.

That’s Bouchard Boys distancing, but can you name the approaching vessel?

This one may almost be close enough to read.

And this one has the biggest give-away colors . . . .

Evelyn Cutler used to be Melvin E. Lemmerhirt, which I remember as a noisy boat.

Ross Sea I first saw in NYC’s sixth boro as Normandy, not

the current Normandy.

McKinley Sea first appeared here as Annabelle V.

And to round this out, Foxy 3 used to be a fleet mate of Lemmerhirt, mentioned above.

All photos on a windy day last week by Will Van Dorp.

 

Barges “1” was years ago.  And here are previous posts that in some way focus on some sort of barge.  But the two photos below, which I took in May, prompt this post.  I can’t identify this Bouchard barge, but look at the size of the yard worker in comparison.

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It’s quite likely this is not one of their largest barges, but it is indeed sizable.

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The B. No. 260 is 350′ loa and slightly different design although a similar deep notch.

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The B. No. 220 is 404′ –here along with Normandy and Bouchard Boys–and

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B. No. 280 is 399′.  I’m not sure which tug is driving it.

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Frederick Bouchard here is powering B. No. 264–350′–

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Evening Tide with B. No. 262--350′– and

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the 317′ loa B. No. 250, pushed by Evening Star.  My point was how large and capacious these barges are . . . ,

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and that is measured in barrels of capacity, not feet.  For these barges then, here’s that info:

B. No. 250                    = 59,000 brls

B. No. 260, 262, 264  =  60,000

B. No. 280                    =  80,000

B. No. 220                     = 110,000 brl

 

In many situations, fuel is measured in metric tons, as covered here.

And this tangent started out with photos taken by Will Van Dorp.

This collage of orange and blue indicates that something unusual approaches . . .

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0846 hr . . .

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0904

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Atlantic Salvor might have been headed out on a long range mission, but

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at this point, I realized this mission would begin in the Lower Bay of the sixth boro along with

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lots of other vessels, although

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something new this year was the escort of four commercial tugs:  Sassafras, Miriam Moran, 

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Atlantic Salvor, and Normandy.   1150.    I was happy to find someone to talk to.

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It’s fleet week NYC.  Welcome all.

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It’s USS DDG 96,

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HMCS D 282,

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WMEC 911,

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HMCS MM 700,

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HMCS MM 708,

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LHD 5,

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DDG 99,

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and LSD 43.

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At 1216, Eric McAllister joins the welcome party . . .

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WLM 552.

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An E-2 flew by too.

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The message on the port wheel well ((?) amused me.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was last year’s arrival.

 

November, port month on tugster, ends here, making this GHP&W 30.  Here’s how the month began.  One thing I learned putting together this post is that Port Richmond and Mariner’s Harbor appear not to share a border, at least according to the wikipedia map.  Between the western edge of Port Richmond and the eastern edge of Mariner’s (the west side of the Bayonne Bridge) is a neighborhood called Elm Park.  I’d never heard of it.  Also, look at the northeast tip of Port Richmond . . . it’s in the water only and includes the Caddell yard.  Furthermore, Port Richmond never seems like much of a port if you see it by road only.  Click here for photos of the land portion of Port Richmond.  Click on the map to make it interactive.

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A google satellite view shows the northernmost margin of land is port-intensive.  Click here for many vintage photos of Port Richmond, pre-Bayonne Bridge, back when Port Richmond was a major ferry/rail link.

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Although the late fall midday sun backlit these shots, let’s cruise the waterside of Port Richmond, starting at its northeastern point, where the Wavertree (1885) project is ongoing.

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Delaware River & Bay Authority’s Delaware is undergoing some major repowering work. 

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Frying Pan . . . light of the night vessel from up at Pier 66 is having some work done.

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In the belly of Frying Pan, where the engine and machinery used to be, a night club sometimes comes to life.    Click here for some renderings of the vessel by the elusive bowsprite.

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Miss Liberty, built 1954, is nearly finished with this dry-docking.  Notice here she is high and dry?  Well, just 45 minutes later, she had been

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splashed and was being towed to a wharf by Caddell’s own L. W. Caddell (1990).

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Continuing to the west, it’s the yards of Reinauer and Moran. From l to r, here, it seems to be Meredith C. Reinauer (2003), Laurie Ann Reinauer (2009), Reinauer Twins (2011), and Dace Reinauer (1968 but JUST repowered). . . and Joan Turecamo with (?) Brendan Turecamo.  The McAllister tug between the Reinauer ATBs . . . I’ll guess is Bruce A. Marjorie B. McAllister.

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This photo, taken a half hour earlier and before Joan Turecamo (1980) tied up, shows Kimberly Turecamo (1980), the very new and beamy  J. R. T. Moran (2015), and Brendan (1975).

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On the west side of the Moran yard, it’s Cable Queen (1952).  Click here for photos of this cable-layer at work through the years.

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And for the last shot of Port Richmond–although this may be straying westward into Elm Park waters, it’s Metropolitan Marine Transportation’s newest Normandy.

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All the photos today by Will Van Dorp.

So as I said at the beginning of this post, so ends the “gunk holes, harbors, ports, and wharves” series.  However, precedent on this blog makes it really easy to do a Port Richmond 2, 3, 4 . . . . etc. post.  also, if any of you feel like contributing a set of photos from a port of gunk hole, no matter how large or obscure, I welcome it.  Besides, there’s always then possibility of doing an “upland” version of any port, focusing on land-based businesses serving the work vessels.

And as for December, let me reprint this idea for a December theme:

How about  antique/classic workboats, functioning or wrecked.  Of course, a definition for that category is impossible.  For example, NewYorkBoater says this:  ‘The definition of an antique boat according to Antique and Classic Boating Society is a boat built between 1919 and 1942.  A classic was built between 1943 and 1975 and the term contemporary, are boats built from 1976 and on.’  Hmm . . . what do you call an old vessel built before 1919 . . . a restoration project?  antediluvian?

If you take another transportation sector–automobiles, you get another definition:  25 years old or more.    And for the great race, here were the rules for this year:  “Vehicle entries must have been manufactured in 1972 or before.”  Next year’s cut-off will likely be 1973.

So my flexible definition is  . . . photo should have been taken in 1999 or before, by you or of you or a family member, and in the case of a wreck, probably identifiable.  Exception . . .  it could be a boat built before  . . . say  . . . 1965.”

Many thanks to all of you who sent along photos, contributed ideas, and commented in November.

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