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Let’s have another look at photos in the sixth boro during the first month of 2012.  It was a snowy day that I caught Cheyenne

and Franklin Reinauer. Cheyenne is now in Wisconsin, for sale, and Franklin is still in this boro.

Thomas Dann had a crane barge over alongside New Century.  Thomas Dann had a serious fire off Florida and was scrapped in 2015.  New Century is now Lucky Century, NE  bound near Mauritius and Reunion.

Bohemia assisted Quantico Creek with a bunker barge. Bohemia is on the Delaware River, and Quantico Creek . . . in Tampa.

This scene was so busy I might come back to it in another post.  What I can identify here (l to r) is this:  Maersk Murotsu, Quantico Creek, of course Greenland Sea, Dubai Express, and a Reinauer barge. Dubai Express is currently on its way from the Med to the sixth boro.

Seaboats had already been scooped up by K-Sea in January 2012, which had itself been scooped up by Kirby.  Notice the stacks of the two boats:  the red/black initials have been painted over and a K-Sea oval placed but not painted with the K-Sea logo nor had the stack itself been painted K-Sea “yellow.”  Mediterranean Sea and

Weddell Sea still carried their mostly-green livery, and when painted, we clearly Kirby boats.  Mediterranean Sea has just recently changed hands again and is now Douglas J., a Donjon boat.  

Beaufort Sea was still fully K-Sea, as evidenced by the yellow stack and the K-Sea oval.   She was scrapped around 2016.

Left to right here, it’s Pearl River I and Morton S. Bouchard Jr.  The ship is now Zim Vancouver–just left Norfolk for Spain–and the tug is now Stasinos Boys. 

Ellen McAllister passed the 7 buoy. 

And finally, Penn Maritime began the year as its own company before been acquired by Kirby, and

Penn No. 6 carried that name forward until 2018 when she began what we now know as Vinik No. 6.

All January 2012 photos, WVD, who hopes you enjoy this photographic account of some of the changes in the sixth boro in the past decade.  I have lots of photos of that month, so I could do an installment “C” of that retrospective.   Besides, although there are things I want to see in the boro today, I might have to acclimate to the cold first.  Yesterday after it was 57 degrees here, and this morning . . .  a dramatic 31.

And unrelated, here‘s how the new year was feted in around the world . . .

Also unrelated, this 1953 “tugboat tug” (sic) is still for sale.

 

 

I’ll devote a whole post once again to the 2012 races, since I have a  lot of photos.  What I did was look for the most dramatic or interesting photos and, in some cases, re-edited them.  What I didn’t do is go back through the 2012 posts, but you can here if you want.

Again, you can identify these, or I’ll help you if you can’t.  I call this the pre-race cluster, with some even pointing upstream, as if Yonkers would be the finish line.

The cluster continues as more boats arrive.

And then there’s the burn-out, or in this case . . .  froth-out as two Cat D-399s crank out over 2200 hp.

The pack spreads out quickly.  This was almost 60 seconds into the race.  If this were a terrestrial drag race, the contest would already be over and the smoke clearer.

I’m not sure I’d want to be in a kayak, particularly a double, as all this wake translates into wave motion.

A full five minutes into the race, Quantico Creek‘s two Cat 3512 3000 hp power plants take her past the finish line with sturm und drang . . .

Seven minutes into the race . . . they’re still coming.

At the 19-minute mark, the race is over, but the bulls appear to have scores to settle . . .

and next thing you know . . . it’s tugboat rugby!

Tomorrow . . .  how about returning to 2013.

All photos, WVD.

 

The sixth boro, like any location, offers infinite perspectives, compounded by equally countless nuance of season, hour, weather, and activity variation.  This view of Kimberly in the stalls at Caddells the other day differs considerably from the dynamic ones of the past 18 months.

Just a few days different but quite different location and atmospherics . . .  Weddell Sea came into the Narrows the other day as we began feeling the effects of Fay.   She had Penn No. 90 on a wire.

Further to the west in another spot, Discovery Coast was on the outside, mostly blocking Brooklyn, who’s been in here for a few months already.

In clear weather, land would be visible beyond the tug, but Fay changed that for a while.

Dace Reinauer was high and dry in Dry Dock No. 7.

 

And finally, just west of Dry Dock No. 7, stacked up were at least seven Bouchard boats, sadly waiting.

All photos, WVD, who’s starting to think about random tugs three hundred.  If you have a photo of a tug never depicted on this blog, send it along. The big three hundred COULD be all never-here-before tugboats.

You’ve seen this boat right in this location two years ago here.

And yet to see her pirouette around, waiting for “sail time,” was a treat.  She’s fairly new boat, 2007, 105′ x 38′ and twin CAT 3516Bs generating 4800hp.

Someone may have been learning the drift, the current.

Finally, show time came and she was on her way, Penn No. 2, quite light.  Since the barge is designed for black oil/asphalt, I’m guessing the boilers are shut off.  Maybe not, since that would allow a film of residue to cake on.  Maybe someone can help me out here.

She heads out alongside, but

the wire is already rigged for a quick evolution.

Once clear of the Kills, she went on the wire and out to sea.

All photos, WVD.

 

J. George Betz and Morton Bouchard Jr. raft up on the floating dock.

Helen Laraway pushes toward the east.

JRT passes Weddell Sea on the way home after completion of another job.

Daisy Mae moves a deeply loaded scow westbound.  I’m not certain but believe the product is road salt.

Discovery Coast heads over toward the Kills.

A light Elk River makes for the next job.

Emily Ann tows  astern passing the collection of boxes in the Global Terminal.

And Majorie B. passes Pacific Sky while she steams back to the McAllister yard.

And one more, Ellen S, Pearl Coast, and Evening Light .  .  round out this installment.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose sense of this decade’s end is growing more palpable, offers this photo of Michigan Service and a whole lotta dredgin’ from the last two weeks of 2009.

Margaret shines “brightly” over by Fort Wadsworth.

Scott Turecamo transfers commodity over at the east end of Bayonne.

I think it is Miss Julia, but I still know nothing about her.

Of the Seaboats fleet absorbed into Kirby, Weddell Sea is the only one I see these days, and here she

gets assistance to the dock from Normandy.

Gracie M. was the newest Reinauer boat at least three boats ago.

With the ongoing renewal in the Reinauer fleet, Morgan must be among the oldest boats they operate.

And I’ll never forget an tempestuous morning when first I heard Evelyn‘s sound, when she was working as Melvin E. Lemmerhirt.

And that returns us to Margaret.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

On a day in the sixth boro, you’ll see a lot of working boats that’ve been around a while.  These are randomly chosen.  Lynx dates from 1967.

Stephen Dann from 1999.

Weddell Sea from 2007 and Lincoln Sea, 2000.

Joyce D. Brown, 2002.

Buchanan 1 . . .  is she aka Buchanan 10?  If so, 1967.

Marty C, 1981.

Little C, 1988.  She looks somewhat similar to Lil Rip. 

Pearl Coast, looking huge out of the notch, 1978.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Different day . . . different character . . .  the Hudson can have thick patches of fog, which

allow Dorothy J to slip past structures on a mysterious shore.

Farther along, Miss Gill guards some incongruous piles of

coal that surely did not arrive through the Delaware and Hudson Canal, which I visited recently but didn’t dip my foot into.

Wendell Sea waits alongside a fuel barge, and

Christiana–not a frequent visitor in the sixth boro–does in her own way

up by the GW Bridge.

 

Helen Laraway stands by scows of different sized crushed stone.

And this gets us down to the sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Well well well . . . the paint confused me here, until

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I gt the name board . . . Mister Jim working while transforming.  Click here for a winter photo of Mister Jim.

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Weddell Sea I’ve not seen in a while. And her barge looks to be undergoing a paint change as well.

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Here’s my first glance close up of the stack of

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Barry Silverton.

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Silverton appears to belong to a different fleet than the Harley tugs that’ve been here for almost 10 years, like HMS St. Andrews.

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Brendan Turecamo here is rushing past CMA CGM Corneille to assist from starboard.  Here’s a Brendan Turecamo photo from almost 10 years ago.   Here’s more on CMA CGM Corneille, and if you want a refresher on who Pierre Corneille was, click here.  Recently the sixth boro has seen other c-ships named for writers like Herman Hesse and Ernest Hemingway.

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Closing this post out . . .it’s Jonathan C Moran, moving a tanker out.  More on this tanker soon.  But

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my photo below shows Jonathan C Moran on her christening day, less than two months ago.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

I should rename this post “Time Warp.”  I started it in May 2008 and this morning–in response to some Facebook exchanges–resurrected it.  Maybe I will begin a series called “Time Warp,” though, and any photos no more than 20 years old–to pick an arbitrary boundary and to keep the series from becoming ancient time warp which could be its own thing– . . . any photos you wish to contribute no more than two decades old would be welcome.   Maybe I gave up on this post six years back because I had too many unanswered questions.

Anyhow, to plunge back in . . . Robert Silva and Harold Tartell provided foto of Manhasset from way back, when it sported a flying horse on its stack . . . .  I assumed this vessel was long ago scrapped.  I’m also assuming the location of this shot can be pegged by the two LNG tanks in the background.

 

Here’s another shot of the vessel (1958) (or 1952) in transition, I presume, sent along by Robert Silva.

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Here’s a photo I took in 2008:  a different small tankship Mostank (1950) maneuvers close to a tanker.  I don’t know if Galahad is still in service, and

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Here in Arthur Kill to resupply, I suppose,  Mostank . . . M O S being Marine Oil Service.  Mostank shows up as registered until at least a year ago.  Emma Miller now serves the sixth boro.

Here’s where the time warp impinges on this post.  Great Gull was around still six or seven or eight years ago.  Time flies.  The Gull has flown south.

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Back then, John B. Caddell was still working.  Is she still intact?

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Nathan E. Stewart was still in town and here moving Mary A. Whalen to the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

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The unique Odin still worked here, and

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Weddell Sea was still known as Scott C.

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All photos here by will Van Dorp unless otherwise attributed.

 

 

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