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Tinkering with the digital file, I’ve made SSV Corwith Cramer clearer here than she was to the naked eye as she came through the foggy Narrows yesterday morning.

Maintaining this blog over many years and springtimes  has taught me how much fog is a spring phenomenon.  Here on a clearer day, Corwith Cramer (1987) raced into the Narrows ahead of a near-summer rainstorm.

USNS Pomeroy is always gray, but she’s even grayer in the fogs of spring.

Had the fog not been here, you’d see the cliffs of Manhattan out beyond this car float,

and to my naked, non-corrected, non-digital eyes, Joyce was much less clear than she is here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s grateful for assistance with photo manipulation tools.

Here are all the previous installments of this series.

Glenn Raymo caught this photo up the Hudson the other day, as Joker assisted a Weeks crane.  Hays tugs do come up here occasionally, but I’ve never seen them.

Back almost exactly six years ago, the same boat headed upriver as a dead ship.  And eight years ago, working for a different company and painted in a different livery, here she was . . .  2011, eastbound in the KVK.

Justin Zizes was coming down the Hudson recently and caught this spring-evoking photo of Nathan G, her gray livery and aggregate cargo set off by the hint of leaves on the tree-lined far shore.

Thanks to Justin also for this photo of Mister Jim in her homeport in Coeymans.

Jan van der Doe sent these photos along of a group of northern European tugs at work, taken in early April by Jan Oosterboer, not far from Rotterdam.

Mutratug 32 is a Carrousel Rave tug, which means she rotate her point of attachment to better brake the assisted vessel.  To see her in action, click here.

And finally, see the tugs in this photo I took on the East River the other day?  Two of them?

Thomas J. Brown is obvious and always a delight to see.  But then there’s Bosco on the barge.  I believe she was heading for a job on the Hutchinson River.

Thanks to Glenn, Justin, Jan, and Jan for photos here.

 

Just for ships and figgles . . . have a glance at 155 and at 55 in this series. While we’re reconnoitering the past, here’s 5.

And here’s springtime 2019.  Might this be the last view I get of tug Viking?  Scuttlebutt’s bumped into me saying so. Her first (I believe) appearance on this blog was over 11 years ago here. She had some near twins, but none evolved quite as she did.

FB has this group I really enjoy called Freighters in the Night;  I could submit this one. Jonathan C escorts an MSC box ship out.

Liz Vinik is a former fleet mate of Viking;  I caught her yesterday entering the kills with a Cashman barge carrying barges. Click here for some photos of previous iterations of this boat.

A dark, slow-to-wake morning like yesterday provides lots of points of light.  Here Joyce D. heads out, likely for her railroad work.

Enjoy these contrasts, Linda L. Miller and Hayward, two specialized boats.

Let’s end with a transient, sporadically seen in the sixth boro, a formerly Pacific Ocean Crowley tug . . .  Morgan,  out of New Bedford.

All photos e-watermarked with invisible metadata as taken by Will Van Dorp in the past month.

 

A confusing pic?

This is more clearly Capt. Brian A. and Eric, the two newest McAllisters in the boro, bringing up the stern of Gerd Maersk.

Much less similar, Ellen and Patrice here work the bow of an outbound tanker.

That top photo may be confusing as the ninth photo here is.  So let me conclude by showing the photos taken seconds before and seconds after it.

For all I know, the smaller Brown tug may have been doing some training.  I snapped that top photo when they were neck-and-neck from my vantage point.  Eventually Thomas J. overtook Joyce.  

The phots in between allow one to see how meticulous the paint scheme is on these boats.  I’d love to see the engine room and other interior spaces.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

The Browns tugs do a lot of different jobs, and who knows where James E. was headed this morning a few days ago, but

one of their regular runs is with the car float moving rail cars for the operation now down as the NYNJRR, the last application of what used to be very common across the sixth boro. 

There are no bridge rail crossings of the Hudson south of the Selkirk hurdle, about 140 miles north of Manhattan. So this is how it happens, and I know lots of you reading this know much more about this operation than I do.  For a photo of a train crossing that bridge known as the Alfred H. Smith Memorial Bridge, see the end of this post.

One or several crossings are done this way daily between Greenville NJ  and Brooklyn NY.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who got the photo below of a train headed east across the Alfred H. Smith Bridge a rainy day in October 2016.

 

I’d say a “dance of cranes,” but then you’d think of the plumed type.  So plethora will have to stand in.  If you look at any links in this post, check out this one from November 2007, where the gantry cranes appear to tango . . . or duel with booms as blades maybe . .  .

Suddenly I had cranes on my brains, like these shoreside ones around the slight bend from Matthew Tibbetts.

Or these over by USNS Pomeroy, which last had a rehab in February 2014.

Busy discharging salt with clamshells are the shipboard cranes on Sinop, and then

there have recently passed lots of cranes on barges like this one moved by Emily Ann and

whose logo I don’t recognize,

this one pushed westbound by Joyce D. Brown and whose logo I’ve

not noticed before either,

and this Weeks 524 around sunrise moved

by Susan Miller.

And to close this post out, this endangered crane, ice-encased and non-functional on a 6-above days.

All photos taken in 2019 by Will Van Dorp.

More cranes from 2010 here,   and from 2009 here  and here  and here.

That’s enough for now.

 

 

 

 

Thomas J. Brown and Sons Inc. has been a marine towing enterprise in the sixth boro since 1927.  Their boats are busy and always very attractive. More than a decade ago I first used this title.

Thomas J. Brown, the oldest current boat, is a classic.

Joyce D. Brown, the most powerful current boat, is headed past Shooters Island here.  That color . . .  I just love it, especially in winter like this.

The newest boat–James E–arrived from the shipyard just a few years ago and regularly moves the rail cars across the boro.   I wonder if this cross-harbor rail tunnel will ever happen.

A few weeks ago James E. was moving this jackup platform.

Paul Strubeck caught the same job here.

As he did catching Thomas assisting James moving rail cars.

And finally, a real treat from Paul, a photo of Cecilia J. Brown, ex- DPC 42, Skipper (1948), Viatic (1952/54), Dalzellance (1957), Cecilia J. Brown, reefed some years ago, although I know not where.

Thanks to Paul for his photos;  all others by will Van Dorp.

 

I love the morning, and I’ve never gotten a better photo of Tasman Sea.  She’s a product of Main Iron Works, class of 1976.

Kirby Moran heads out on a job.   There’s no angle from which these Washburn & Doughty 6000s look anything but stunning.

Ernest Campbell, from Southern Shipbuilding’s class of 1969, comes by to pick up a barge.

James E. Brown, a recent product of Rodriguez Shipbuilding, leaves the dock and heads to the railroad, rail float that is. Daisy Mae came out of the same yard two years later.

As Robert Burton makes her run with a less than loaded barge, I hope commuters appreciate that this stuff is not traveling by road.

Lucy Reinauer is a powerful local 1973 product;  she came out of Jakobson Shipyard in Oyster Bay.

I’m planning a post on nothing but Brown boats, but I put Thomas J. in here because she’s bathed in that same rich morning light.   She’s a 1962 product of Gladding Hearn and is rated at 1000 hp, same as James E.

Elizabeth McAllister has a dramatic and rich history, which you can read here.  To summarize, in May 1988 as Elizabeth Moran, she was t-boned in the fog in Lower New York Bay.

And finally, two of Brewster Marine‘s workhorses . . .  Helen Parker (2005) and Ava Jude (2013).  In the distance is Neptune, built 1992 and sailing for Dann Ocean since 1996.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s a good view of the props on a z-drive boat.  The 8.5′ props are part of the Schottel SRP 1515 FP drive system.  Note the port-a-potty between the stacks, a dry-dock worker convenience?

The scale of the cranes at Howland Hook belies the fact that Jay Michael and Bosco, passing Shooters Island, are still at least a mile closer to the lens than HH port.

In different light, here’s a Bosco closeup.

James E. Brown before dawn;  the structure like a lighthouse beyond JEB‘s stern is the control tower at Newark Airport, which celebrates its 90th anniversary this coming October.

The Statue salutes Little C.  I’ve often tried for a photo that suggests the Statue’s eyes are fixed on something in the foreground, and I’d say here Little C has helped me make that happen.

Barge John Blanche is returned homeward through Hell Gate by Diane B.

OK . . .  Is it Joan or Doris?

I’ll stop here.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

On a day in the sixth boro, you’ll see a lot of working boats that’ve been around a while.  These are randomly chosen.  Lynx dates from 1967.

Stephen Dann from 1999.

Weddell Sea from 2007 and Lincoln Sea, 2000.

Joyce D. Brown, 2002.

Buchanan 1 . . .  is she aka Buchanan 10?  If so, 1967.

Marty C, 1981.

Little C, 1988.  She looks somewhat similar to Lil Rip. 

Pearl Coast, looking huge out of the notch, 1978.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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