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January, once every four years, involves a formality that we mark today.  Inaugurate has a strange derivation, you figure it out.  With this post, I’m in no way intending to divine futures.  Really it’s just sets of photos taken four years apart. 

Ice and lightship yacht Nantucket floated in the harbor in mid January 2009. Do you remember what else was literally in the harbor?

Weeks tugs stood by ready to move a barge underneath the airplane when Weeks 533 lifted the Airbus 320 from harbor waters that had cushioned its fall . . . twelve years ago. 

Next inauguration day, 2013, I watched fishermen drag clams from the bottom of Gravesend Bay.

Rebel, destined not to run much longer, pushed a barge across the Upper Bay with an incomplete WTC beyond.  Many more details had not yet sprouted on the Manhattan skyline.

Mid January 2017 . . . CMA CGM Nerval headed for the port with Thomas J. Brown off its starboard.  Here‘s what I wrote about this photo and others exactly four years ago.

Nerval still needed to make its way under the yet-to-be completed raising of the Bayonne Bridge, assisted by JRT Moran.  This view was quite different in mid January 2017.   As of today, this container ship in on the Mediterranean on a voyage between Turkey and Morocco.

All photos, WVD, taken in mid January at four-year intervals.  Nothing should be read into the choice of photos.  Sorry I have no photos from January 20, 2005, because back then I didn’t take as many photos, and four years before that, I was still using a film camera, took fewer photos in a year than now I do on certain days, and that skyline above was very different.

My inaugural event . . .  cleaning my desk, my office, and my kitchen.   If you’re looking for an activity, something might need cleaning. Laundry?   Yup, work after work.  All inaugurations call for clean ups.

And if you want to buy that lightship yacht above, here‘s the info.

 

This series I use to feature others’ photos that are different from what I typically shoot, different in either location or perspective or subject.  I am very grateful to you, readers,  when you send these photos in.

David Silver sent this in just yesterday, taken in Norfolk.

Down in Norfolk, Mike Vinik and Rhino had just finished a tow there, and stopped by David’s workplace. I visited Vinik No. 6, Mike, and Rhino earlier this year, although it seems several years ago now. In case you’re wondering, Rhino weighs in at a trim 140 pounds.

Xlime promenaded along the East River  in Brooklyn the other day and saw some sights.   She writes:  “I happened upon three Brown tugs this morning – Thomas, who’s always so picturesque and the mighty James and Joyce (a literary pairing) who I’ve seen together twice now bringing reinforcements to the piers project in Brooklyn Bridge Park. I happened to be on Pier 3 this morning when they pulled up. Okay, maybe I doubled back when I realized where they were going. “

I’d never thought about the literary ring of these names. 

 

A few (2013!!) years ago Brad Ickes sent me photos of Cable Queen.   Recently she was hauled out and here are the photos he sent.  Brad writes:  “Queen was just cleaned up, repainted and made pretty again.”

 

Pretty she is, and I still hope some day catching her at work.

 

 

One more here . . . although I found this on youtube . . .  a streaming music/light show on Bannerman’s Island, coming up in a few days.  Tickets are available now. 

And a last one, survey vessel Shearwater was working at the Narrows the other day.  Her track on AIS illustrates what she was doing.

Many thanks to David, xlime, and Brad for use of these photos.

It’s the season.

I wonder if the Kimberly crew has marked other holidays and I missed it.  I did catch the red-clad guy almost a year ago.

Mary H and her barge Patriot is likely headed for Newtown Creek.  The 1981 build, such a clean looking tug, has been working in the sixth boro for 33 years.

We’ve had a spate of foggy days.  Beyond Franklin here, notice the bright lights at Bayonne Shipyard where work proceeds on Mendonca even at night.

The mechanical dredge J. P. Boisseau here gets moved to a new worksite by Sarah Ann, with Brian Nicholas standing by.

A Maersk ship came in recently with a gaggle of assist boats:  l to r, Ava, Ellen, and Matthew. Not visible is Charles D. McAllister, and the visible Thomas J. Brown is not assisting.Yes, Matthew Tibbetts is doing a fair amount of ship assist work these days, and why not. 

Here are two more photos of Matthew Tibbetts doing ship assist.

Helen Laraway passed through with a load of scrap.

Poling & Cutler’s Crystal and Evelyn pass in opposite directions.

HMS Justice has eluded my eyes for quite a while, but here she is, with the Centerline Logistics feline on the superstructure.

All photos, WVD.

Behold an entire fleet, and the current boats of a family business operating boats in New York since 1927.

The Brown family boats are distinguished by their color and meticulous condition. 

 

Maybe you can’t tell by their condition, but one of these boats dates from 2015, one from 2002, and one from 1962.  Styling may give it away, if you don’t just already know.

With all this foggy weather fading out the background, the green livery and polychromatic trim really pops out.

 

 

 

Off to work.  In case you don’t know, Thomas is from 1962, and James . . . from 2015.

All photos, WVD.

There’s this below from ancient Roman vineyards in Gaul, near this  monolith church . . .  Also, about 30 miles away in Bordeaux is the repurposed WW2 submarine base . . . repurposed for art. But I started out beyond left field here and have digressed in an even more oblique direction.

Saint Emilion is this tugboat with angles . . . and three rectangular windows, wheelhouse and upper wheelhouse . . .  Note the difference in lines with Joyce D. Brown.

She’s angular indeed, a bit reminiscent of a Nighthawk.  The livery of white with yellow trim accentuates these angles.

To see the time of her transformation from Barbara C to Arabian Sea, click here and scroll a bit.  To see her in many jobs as Arabian Sea, click here.

Anyone know why Apex chose this name?

Compare many points of her random partner on the KVK, above and below.

 

All photos, WVD.

 

 

We’re past the big 300 and on our way to the 400, maybe.   Nine tugboats appear in this post.  Can you arrange them greatest to least in horsepower?  Longest to shortest?  To make it easier, you can rank them in top group of three to bottom group.

Ruby M eastbound one early morning,

 

Sarah D entering,

Sarah Ann with a flotilla of crane barges,

James E Brown going to work,

Larry J Hebert and the the dredging operation near MOTBY,

Mister Jim departing the Kills by the Back Channel,

John Joseph entering the Kills,

William Brewster heading for the fuel dock,

and finally, East Coast entering the Kills.

She’s generally moving the sugar barge.  Has anyone seen Sea Robin recently?

Ranked in three groups by horsepower, it’s Larry J Hebert (3600), John Joseph (3400), and Sarah Ann (2700).  Next group are Mr Jim, East Coast, and Sarah D. Third group is Ruby M, William Brewster, and James E. Brown (1000).

Ranked in length . . . East Coast (120′), John Joseph, Ruby M.  Sarah D, Larry J Hebert, Sarah Ann.   Mister Jim, James E. , William Brewster (65′)

Info comes from Birk Thomas’s fantastic database.

All photos, WVD.

 

On we go . . .  Alexandra does not appear frequently here. If my count is correct, this is only the third time since and including 2008 that this 120′ x 34′ 4000hp boat’s been posted here.  She’s currently working on a dredging project near Sandy Hook.

An action shot here of Mister T doing what the 82′ x 24′ 2400hp Mister T does.

Pegasus has to be among the cleanest looking boats, a fact accentuated here by the rusty stains on the hull of the tanker beyond her.  Dimensions . . . 75′ x 26′ x 1900hp.

The Browns . . . James  and Joyce, move this car float across between Owls Head and Greenville.  The absence of leaves on the trees shows how long ago I took this and most of these photos.  They are 74′ x 30′ x 1000 and 78′ x 26′ 2400, respectively.

Patrice, 105′ x 34′ 4500, has been here almost 10 years.

Nathan G, 73 x 24′ 1200′, moves a scow  westbound on the KVK.  I’d have guessed her larger than that.

Paul Andrew does the paper barge.  She’s 64′ x 23′ and 1200hp.

And finally, JRT sees one ship out and positions herself for the next job.

Here was my first photo of the 6000hp 89′ x 38′ tugboat back in late 2015.  The photo reminds me I should use the fisheye more often.

All photos, WVD.

Stephen Reinauer westbound as the sun heads in the same direction.

Mary Turecamo assists an MOL ship into port.

Ava M pushes toward the pilot’s door on the side of another container ship.

James D heads to the next job amid two container ships in the approaches.

Margaret throttles up alongside.

James William travels toward Howland Hook.

James E. heads, no doubt, for the car float with rail cars awaiting it.

Stephen Dann heads in to get some fuel.

Emily Ann travels light toward the Upper Bay.

All photos from a socially-distanced, physically-isolated, seasonally-adjusted, pent-up energized, freely-masked, and emotionally-stale  WVD.

 

Followingup from yesterday and “…maybe it’s time for new permutations of truckster, teamster, bikester, autoster, planester, hutster, hikester, storyster, . . . ” let me say you’ve sent in some great ideas which I’ll follow up on in the next few days.

For now, let’s glance back 10 years to April 2010.  Any idea what this is all about?

Indeed, it was the arrival of 343Here‘s the post I did on that event.

A perennial harbor towing star is the Thomas J. BrownHere‘s the post with these now reposted photos.  What’s amazing to me here is the fact that two scows are being towed on a single hawser attached front starboard side of the lead barge.

Maybe there’s a term for this, other than brilliant?

Currently a tug operates through the harbor with the name Curtis Reinauer. Actually it’s the third boat with that name.  The one depicted below, 1979, the second iteration, is now in West African waters.  The original Curtis was reefed, although I haven’t located where.

APL Japan, with its port of registry as Oakland CA, was built in 1995;  since she appears not to have moved in some months from its anchorage in Gulf of Khambhat, I’m guessing she’s scrapped, although I can’t find evidence of that.

I count 15 containers across on the stern.

And finally, Steve Irwin, the Sea Shepherd boat, was in town in April 2010.  It has since been retired, was slated to be scrapped, but then saved as a museumship and is currently in Williamstown, Victoria in Australia.

The post I did on Irwin back then did not include the photo below, and

although I included the photo below, I did not comment on the ports of registry given, Rotterdam AND Kahnawake.  Now that I recognize what that is, I’m wondering about that relationship.  how many other vessels are Kahnawake registered?  Here‘s part of the story.

All photos here, WVD, taken in April 2010.

Stay healthy.

Following on yesterday’s comparison . . . two more tugboats, both active but with entirely different missions . . . I offer for your perusal, key word . . . perusal.

Thomas J. Brown, built 1962 and 60’x 19′ with hull depth of 8′, has a single CAT generating 1000 hp.

Ava M McAllister, christened in 2019 and 100′ x 40′ with a hull depth of 22′, has twin CAT mains generating 6770 hp.

The comparison is ludicrous from a performance perspective;  as I said before, they have entirely different missions.  Some comparisons here would make as little sense as pitting a pro stock race car against a top fuel machine . . .  but those are both drag strip cars.  Here’s another . . . compare a Grand National hydroplane with a Jersey Speed Skiff; they’re both race boats and not landing craft, both well-maintained and precision built for speed within defined parameters.  Likewise, above you’re looking at two tugboats, both of which are working boats in the sixth boro.

All photos, WVD, who’s learned the joys of hand washing.

Here’s another interesting comparison and why I said perusal:  Peru, South America with Peru, Indiana, North America with all the other Perus in the US.

 

 

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