You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Linda Lee Bouchard’ tag.

Now that I’m at installment 291 of this series, I’m rethinking the adjective random.  Check out these meanings old and new here. But “random” it is until I come up with a better word.  I’d rejected the descriptor “miscellaneous” when I first started.  How about one from this list:  some, select, chance, serendipitous, entropic, stochastic . . ..

Enjoy this novel juxtaposition, Coney Island Light and Denise A., with her barge.  Denise A. is from 2014, a 4000hp tug with dimensions of 112′ x 35′ x 17′.

Marjorie B McAllister waits in the offing.  You might not guess that she’s worked since 1974 with her 4000hp and 112′ x 30′ hull.

Franklin Reinauer pirouettes her 81′ x 28′ hull right in front of me, the 1984 tug propelled by 2600 hp.

Capt. Brian A heads out for yet another job.

Meanwhile, Linda Lee Bouchard and two of her sisters, Ellen and Evening Star, bide their time at old Home Port. Linda Lee is from 2006, her 125′ x 38′ hull powered by 6140hp.  The sisters are 1982 104′ x 35′ and 3900hp and 2012 112′ x 35′ and 4000hp, respectively.

B. Franklin has been hard at work since 2012, measuring in at 112′ x 33′ and powered by 4000hp.

Robert IV came off the ways in 1975, and sometimes her  56′ x 22′ and  1050hp is just right.

More shots of Linda Lee

and Capt. Brian A.

and Evening Star.

And to conclude, hat tip to Stephen Reinauer, from 1970 and 101′ x 31′ and 3000 hp.

All photos, WVD, who thanks all who watched the Erie Canal presentation yesterday.  Here‘s more Erie Canal on Saturday.

 

 

It’s hard to believe that this title has come up 286 times before today, but here they all are.  And yet, I’m starting out with a photo of Ellen McAllister, who herself has appeared here hundreds of times, but never quite like this, heading into the  dawn and about to pass an unidentifiable Vane tugboat.

Ditto Pegasus, passing between a Bouchard tug to the left and some Centerline boats to the right, and below that ONE container on the bridge and the Fedex plane in the sky.

Double Skin 57 and Long Island, previously Peter F. Gellatly,  moves a barge past IMTT, where some Reinauer boats–RTC 103 and Morgan— are taking on product.

Potomac gets an assist from Fort Schuyler.

Ava M. McAllister passes UACC Ibn Al Haitham, where Genesis Victory is lightering and Liz Vinik assisting.

On another morning, Fort Schuyler heads for the Upper Bay, and that looks like Kristin Poling in the distance to the left.

And where Meredith C. Reinauer is lightering Marvin Faith, Bouchard’s Linda Lee, Ellen S., and Evening Breeze look on.

All photos recently by WVD,who had to look up the namesake of the UACC crude carrier.   He turns out to be a Basra-born scientist from a millenium (!!) ago.  That link is worth a read.

 

What does a 70+ degree temperature day in February in the sixth boro look like?  Well . . . see for yourself.  Cornell light and likely back from a TOAR training, rafts up to Mary Whalen in Atlantic Basin.

Along the Brooklyn shore, there was Genesis Glory with GM11105.

Brooklyn–ex-Labrador Sea–light was headed for the Kills.

An anchored Crystal Cutler stood by with Patricia E. Poling.  Over in the distance is Malik al Ashtar, another 13,000+ teu container ship.  See Crystal light, high and dry here.

Over near the foot of Atlantic Avenue, Linda Lee Bouchard stands by alongside B. No. 205.

And finally, along the BQE and Brooklyn Heights, C. Angelo with EMA  1152, the EMA standing for Express Marine, the outfit that used to deliver fuel to the sixth boro’s coal-fired plants.  Express Marine tugs Consort and Escort used to be regulars in the port.  I believe they are currently “laid up.”

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are all the previous “pairs” post, a direction I glanced at after seeing Bouchard Boys and Linda Lee Bouchard rafted up last weekend . . .  I’m not sure why the formation, but it certainly showed their relative size.

And once I see a pattern in one place, I start to notice it in others.  Here Otter and Pike almost appear to be in the right lane for Exit 10.   I’m eager to see Muskie and Gar.

Over in Hudson Yards below “the vessel” a pair of Schenectady’s finest EMDs hold a place in the rotation out east.

Between Montreal and Trois-Rivieres lies Lac St. Pierre, where I saw this pair.  To the right, I’ve already commented that Espada used to call in the sixth boro as Stena Poseidon.  Now I look up Laurentia–to the left–and discover she used to call in our watery boro as Palva!   If it’s about the witness protection program, the effort would be foolproof.  I’d never have seen Palva in her new color, suggesting to me that paint and color trump lines.

A report that continues to fascinate me about Lac St. Pierre is that it spawns “ice rocks,” which are rocks that become embedded in the winter ice in the shallow portions of the lake that freeze solid all the way to the lakebed, until these rocks are carried downstream encased in floating ice and become lethal targets for fast spinning propellers.  Ice rocks, what a concept!

Pairs of dug canal banks, as seen in midSeptember west of Rome, show how surveyor straight some parts of the waterway are.

Guard gates are essential canal infrastructure.

And I’ll conclude with a pair of liberty statues, one pointed east and the other west.  A few of you will know immediately where a pair of these “crowns” a building, and I’ll just wait for someone to make the identification.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who asks as treat that you share your favorite tugster post or obsession or vessel  . . . today with some friends.  Be safe.

Oh, and one of my favorites is this post I did about a Halloween-escape trip seven (!!) years ago.

 

And then it was a sunny but cold day, the coldest so far in the sixth boro.  ut the light was great.

B.Franklin Reinauer headed for the fuel stop,

srt1

followed by a group that included

srt2

Zachery Reinauer,

srt3

Arabian Sea,

srt4

and Doubleskin 40 pushed by a mostly self-effacing Fort McHenry.  

srt5

 

srt6

Later Tarpon raced past, as

srt7

did Mister T and

srt8

Chesapeake moved her barge eastward.

srt9

Out in Gravesend Bay, Ruth M. Reinauer and Linda Lee Bouchard swung on the hook.

srt10

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Tugs operating in the harbor can be divided into smaller and larger fleets. Bouchard, one of the larger fuel barge fleets, uses distinctive colors of cherry jelly and peanut butter set off by white. Bouchard Transportation has a family business tradition that goes back to another terror attack, the infamous Black Tom explosion in Jersey City. Like any business, they’ve faced choppy waters such as the sinking of Morton S. Bouchard.

 

llb.jpg

Oh, the first two words on the stern above though evoke a flood, albethey private recollections of Linda Lee Bouchard, more feelings even than Alice can, if truth be told. Bouchard really has great non-family names; my favorites have to include the one below.

 

et.jpg

Notice the helicopter below at the apex of a triangle formed by Frederick‘s stern and Lady Bartholdi’s right arm below.

 

p1010043.jpg

So here’s a mystery. I love this crew boat, called Evening Light, similar name and paint scheme to Evening Tide. Is this a Bouchard boat?

 

elgh2.jpg

Surely someone knows. All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

 

elgh.jpg

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,369 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

June 2020
M T W T F S S
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930