You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Fort Schuyler’ tag.

By numbers of boats, Vane Brothers has the largest fleet operating in the sixth boro, or maybe it just seems that way because the boats appear uniform, but there are subtle differences in size, power, vintage, and some of you know what else.  It helps to think of this fleet as several classes, not all of which are shown in this post.  The classes here are Elizabeth Anne, since 2015; Patapsco, since 2004;  and Sassafras, since 2008;  here I’ll abbreviate these classes as  EA, PTS, and SAS

Elizabeth Anne is now part of the Vane NW fleet working on the Salish Sea aka Puget Sound.  Both Patapsco and Sassafras, now Steven Wayne and George Holland, respectively have been sold out of the Vane fleet.  

Nanticoke was launched in 2004, 4200 hp,  and 95′ x 43.’  These are common to all/most PTS class.  Assisting here is Fort McHenry, 2016, 3000 hp, and 90′ x 32,’ standard for SAS class. 

Philadelphia dates from 2017, 4200 hp, 95′ x 34,’ standard for the EA class. 

Wye River is a 2008 PTS-class boat, 4200 and 96′ x 34.’  I’m not sure of that 96′ loa number. 

Choptank is a 2006 PTS boat. 

Elk River is a 2009 SAS boat. 

New York is a 2017 EA boat.  I took this photo in the Black Rock Canal, in Buffalo. This is the only non-sixth boro image in this post.

Cape Fear is 2018 SAS boat.  Fort McHenry in the distance has been mentioned above. 

Charleston is 2018 EA.

Pocomoke is a 2008 PTS.

Fells Point is a 2014 SAS boat. 

Kings Point is SAS, 2014.   Jacksonville is a 2018 EA boat. 

And to close for now, Fort Schuyler is a 2015 SAS boat. 

All photos, any errors, WVD.  Transiting the sixth boro now and then and some stick around, Vane Brothers has at least three other classes of boats in their fleet.

A previous all-Vane post can be found here

 

Almost exactly a year ago, I had a glimpse of sea smoke in the sixth boro here.   Basically, it can be seen when “cold” air comes into contact with warmer water;  as soon as the air is warmed by the rising sun, the mist dissipates.   Photos taken during the window it’s visible, in combination with the twilight colors, have rich colors.

Above and below, that’s Sea Lion transiting the swirling wisps of smoke.

Fort Schuyler appeared next, passing

through the warm exhalations of the warm water of flooding tide, backlit by the rising sun.

A bit later, the golden hour of dawn was no more, but

the smoke was visible,

as Genesis Vigilant glided past. 

Once it was alongside my location, with the sun to the right of the photo, no smoke could be seen.

All photos, any errors, WVD.

More sea smoke can be seen here and here.   Ice, on the other hand, looks like this

Quick post today with sights around the boro . . . like Morgan Reinauer

and James William

and Alex McAllister

and Ava M.McAllister and 

Janet D and 

Fort Schuyler and 

Brinn Courtney and 

Ivory Coast.  Note these last two mark the October awareness

All photos, my hat tip, WVD.

 

She powered herself away from the Fort Schuyler dock for most likely the final time.  Click here for all the previous posts I’ve done on this soon-to-be-replaced training ship. Her replacement is already in the water in Philly for fitting out, sea trials . . . .

This morning Ellen and Marjorie pulled her away from the dock as a number of cadets waited

in the rain.   Cadets and alums traded stories.

 

On many departures, she’d be rotated and pointed westbound on the East River, but today

she ducked under Throngs Neck Bridge, past Fort Totten, and 

made for the western Long Island

lighthouses.

All photos, shortly ago, WVD.

 

Let’s start with a routine KVK scene:  l to r, an orange tanker with a neon green stack, a Poling unit, and escort tug Ava M.

Compare Fort Schuyler‘s  green and Kimberly Poling‘s green. 

But then the frame contains only Kimberly and Kristin.

It’s possible that Kimberly was going to do an assist for her fleet sister. 

But it made for an fleet shot.

 

All photos, WVD.

What follows is photos of eleven Vane Brothers tugboats.  Can you identify the four that are 3000 hp;  the others are all 4200 hp.  The difference lies with the height of theupper wheelhouse.

You choices are Susquehanna,

Magothy and Fort McHenry,

 

Cape Fear,

Fells Point,

Choptank,

Fort McHenry again,

Pokomoke,

Hunting Creek,

and again . . .

Patuxent, and

Elizabeth Anne.

All photos, WVD.

The 3000s are Fort McHenry, Fort Schuyler, Fells Point,  Hunting Creek.  The key is the shorter upper wheelhouse stalk.

 

This title goes back more than 10 years.  But I got some congested photos recently, so I dredge up an old title.  Count the boats of all sizes here.  Of course, foreshortening makes them seem much closer to each other than they really are.  I count at least 12 vessels on the photo below, including some I had not noticed when I took it.

There are five here, and maybe two miles of separation between the two container ships.

Three operations were happening simultaneously in this stretch of the channel, and all were either stemming or moving very slowly.

Again, there’s lots of foreshortening here.

It may be exhilarating to get this close to a large ship, but if your engine stalls . . .  stuff’ll happen really fast.

Here’s a different sort of “traffic” photo from august 31, 2008 . . . exactly 12 years ago.  And it gives me an idea for a post.  By the way, left to right, can you name at least half of the 12 boats at least partly visible here?

All photos, WVD.

x

This ship came into the harbor recently.  Guess the company?  A USACE boat and a small fishing boat came in ahead of the ship, as did

(l to r) Brendan Turecamo, Fort Schuyler, Alex McAllister, and NS Leader.

You may be surprised when I tell you which company runs the small container ship . . .

 

Maersk Bahamas, launched in Guanzhou in 2016.  According to Baltic Shipping, she’s already operated under the following names, if I understand this correctlyGuangzhou Wenchong 4, Nobsepena, Oor, Nor Serena 8, and Nord Serena.

Now some of those are so close that I’m thinking there’s more to the story I’m not getting.  The stack, even in the first photo is Maersk blue, but the flat gray hull and bright red cranes and trim, that I’ve never seen on a Maersk vessel.

In this photo of a busy west end of the KVK and taken 10 minutes after the photo above, the Maersk blue stack is clear.

While I work away my backlog of photos, here’s one I barely caught with an intriguing name:  Mr Tigris.  I’m thinking there should be a sister vessel . . .  Ms Euphrates.  And how about cousin or half sister Ms Karun.

If the Karun is new to you and if you’re looking to explore via your computer, take a slow (actually relatively fast and comfortable) trip up the Karun from its “mouth” in Khorramshahr up to Ahvaz.  Notice all the hulks in shipyards along the lower parts of the river. All this fits into my mindset these days as I’m revisiting and revising My Babylonian Captivity, which was unfolding exactly 30 years ago.

All photos and text, WVD.

Yesterday the KVK was a crowded place.    Notice anything else unusual about this photo?  Fort Schuyler is disappearing off to the left, and Brendan Turecamo is assisting the vessel off to the right.

In the distance tanker NS Leader was escorted in by a McAllister tug to port and a Reinauer tug to starboard.  Reinauer?  Assisting tankers?

Go, Jill!

The 1967 2200 hp 91′ x 27′ tug pushes barges, assists barges,

and this was my first time to see her assisting a tanker.  As I said, at that hour yesterday, lots of assisting was needed.

As to the tanker, the 2007 Korea-built 817′ x 144′ tanker specializes in crude. She came here came from Point Tupper.

To port, Alex was assisting with its 4300 hp and 87′ x 35′ dimensions.

And crowded it was.

All photos yesterday by WVD.

It’s hard to believe that this title has come up 286 times before today, but here they all are.  And yet, I’m starting out with a photo of Ellen McAllister, who herself has appeared here hundreds of times, but never quite like this, heading into the  dawn and about to pass an unidentifiable Vane tugboat.

Ditto Pegasus, passing between a Bouchard tug to the left and some Centerline boats to the right, and below that ONE container on the bridge and the Fedex plane in the sky.

Double Skin 57 and Long Island, previously Peter F. Gellatly,  moves a barge past IMTT, where some Reinauer boats–RTC 103 and Morgan— are taking on product.

Potomac gets an assist from Fort Schuyler.

Ava M. McAllister passes UACC Ibn Al Haitham, where Genesis Victory is lightering and Liz Vinik assisting.

On another morning, Fort Schuyler heads for the Upper Bay, and that looks like Kristin Poling in the distance to the left.

And where Meredith C. Reinauer is lightering Marvin Faith, Bouchard’s Linda Lee, Ellen S., and Evening Breeze look on.

All photos recently by WVD,who had to look up the namesake of the UACC crude carrier.   He turns out to be a Basra-born scientist from a millenium (!!) ago.  That link is worth a read.

 

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