You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Fort Schuyler’ tag.

This title goes back more than 10 years.  But I got some congested photos recently, so I dredge up an old title.  Count the boats of all sizes here.  Of course, foreshortening makes them seem much closer to each other than they really are.  I count at least 12 vessels on the photo below, including some I had not noticed when I took it.

There are five here, and maybe two miles of separation between the two container ships.

Three operations were happening simultaneously in this stretch of the channel, and all were either stemming or moving very slowly.

Again, there’s lots of foreshortening here.

It may be exhilarating to get this close to a large ship, but if your engine stalls . . .  stuff’ll happen really fast.

Here’s a different sort of “traffic” photo from august 31, 2008 . . . exactly 12 years ago.  And it gives me an idea for a post.  By the way, left to right, can you name at least half of the 12 boats at least partly visible here?

All photos, WVD.

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This ship came into the harbor recently.  Guess the company?  A USACE boat and a small fishing boat came in ahead of the ship, as did

(l to r) Brendan Turecamo, Fort Schuyler, Alex McAllister, and NS Leader.

You may be surprised when I tell you which company runs the small container ship . . .

 

Maersk Bahamas, launched in Guanzhou in 2016.  According to Baltic Shipping, she’s already operated under the following names, if I understand this correctlyGuangzhou Wenchong 4, Nobsepena, Oor, Nor Serena 8, and Nord Serena.

Now some of those are so close that I’m thinking there’s more to the story I’m not getting.  The stack, even in the first photo is Maersk blue, but the flat gray hull and bright red cranes and trim, that I’ve never seen on a Maersk vessel.

In this photo of a busy west end of the KVK and taken 10 minutes after the photo above, the Maersk blue stack is clear.

While I work away my backlog of photos, here’s one I barely caught with an intriguing name:  Mr Tigris.  I’m thinking there should be a sister vessel . . .  Ms Euphrates.  And how about cousin or half sister Ms Karun.

If the Karun is new to you and if you’re looking to explore via your computer, take a slow (actually relatively fast and comfortable) trip up the Karun from its “mouth” in Khorramshahr up to Ahvaz.  Notice all the hulks in shipyards along the lower parts of the river. All this fits into my mindset these days as I’m revisiting and revising My Babylonian Captivity, which was unfolding exactly 30 years ago.

All photos and text, WVD.

Yesterday the KVK was a crowded place.    Notice anything else unusual about this photo?  Fort Schuyler is disappearing off to the left, and Brendan Turecamo is assisting the vessel off to the right.

In the distance tanker NS Leader was escorted in by a McAllister tug to port and a Reinauer tug to starboard.  Reinauer?  Assisting tankers?

Go, Jill!

The 1967 2200 hp 91′ x 27′ tug pushes barges, assists barges,

and this was my first time to see her assisting a tanker.  As I said, at that hour yesterday, lots of assisting was needed.

As to the tanker, the 2007 Korea-built 817′ x 144′ tanker specializes in crude. She came here came from Point Tupper.

To port, Alex was assisting with its 4300 hp and 87′ x 35′ dimensions.

And crowded it was.

All photos yesterday by WVD.

It’s hard to believe that this title has come up 286 times before today, but here they all are.  And yet, I’m starting out with a photo of Ellen McAllister, who herself has appeared here hundreds of times, but never quite like this, heading into the  dawn and about to pass an unidentifiable Vane tugboat.

Ditto Pegasus, passing between a Bouchard tug to the left and some Centerline boats to the right, and below that ONE container on the bridge and the Fedex plane in the sky.

Double Skin 57 and Long Island, previously Peter F. Gellatly,  moves a barge past IMTT, where some Reinauer boats–RTC 103 and Morgan— are taking on product.

Potomac gets an assist from Fort Schuyler.

Ava M. McAllister passes UACC Ibn Al Haitham, where Genesis Victory is lightering and Liz Vinik assisting.

On another morning, Fort Schuyler heads for the Upper Bay, and that looks like Kristin Poling in the distance to the left.

And where Meredith C. Reinauer is lightering Marvin Faith, Bouchard’s Linda Lee, Ellen S., and Evening Breeze look on.

All photos recently by WVD,who had to look up the namesake of the UACC crude carrier.   He turns out to be a Basra-born scientist from a millenium (!!) ago.  That link is worth a read.

 

I’m always on the look out for new tugboats in the harbor, and Camie mostly fits that bill.  A bit of research, though, finds she’s been on the blog a few times already, however.

Here, l to r, it’s Polar Bright, Ava, New York, and Stephen B.

Robert Burton here is tending a rock scow in front of the very busy Bayonne background.

James Brown moves some scrap barges . . . likely in the direction of the East River.

Weddell Sea stands by with Penn No. 90, demonstrating all the components of “push gear.”

Maybe someone can clarify here, but it appears No. 90 has cargo heating gear.

 

Helen Laraway moves a scow toward a morning.

And Fort Schuyler heads straight for us–I’m zoomed in–away from a marine/industrial Brooklyn background.

For the last day of November 2019, all photos by Will Van Dorp.

And finally, click here for Paul Strubeck’s Vintage Diesel Design blog post on tugboat Luna in Boston.  It expands a post I did on Luna here almost four years ago.

 

I didn’t hear any wind speeds for yesterday, but it was blowing . . . winds of November according to the date, but fortunately not a November witch.

Chem Wolverine scudded through the Bay,

Kings Point went on with her routine,

Gabby Miller returned to home base,

Joyce aimed for the Kills,

Mister T slung a scow, 

Crystal pushed Patricia E. Poling,

ONE Ibis had some containers shuffled after spending time off Long Beach,

Fort Schuyler dispatched Double Skin 30,

and Chem Wolverine, on her way to Albany, passed Dace Reinauer.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wishes a safe day to all.

Previous excessively windy days posts can be found here.

I take a lot of photos.  A few are extraordinary, IMHO.  The photo below ranks among that select set.

Above and below, it’s Jonathan C Moran.  Sharon Sea heads for sea above.

Atlantic Salvor takes yet another scow filled with dredge spoils out to the dumping grounds.

Atlantic Dawn heads out.

Emily Ann tows Chesapeake 1000 down toward Norfolk.

St Andrews moves a petro barge.

Frances has a headline to a barge in the anchorage.

Two Vane boats wait in Gowanus Bay.

And James D. has a line onto ONE Stork.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Let’s do the numbers again.  No, Pelham is NOT becoming a tugantine in the tradition of Norfolk Rebel.  Seeing Pelham out of the water really reveals a beauty I hadn’t noticed before.

OK, numbers, built in 1960 and rated at 3000 hp.

Atlantic Coast, 2007 and 3000hp.

 

Genesis Vision, 1981 and 3000hp.

Margaret Moran, 1979 and 3000hp.

(l to r) Fort Schuyler 2015 and 3000hp, Patuxent 2008 and 4200, and Kings Point 2014 and 3000.

Note the difference in “neck” length leading to the upper wheelhouse;  that hints at the difference in engines.

Resolve, 2007 and 9280hp.

Brownsville, 2008 and 12,000hp.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is playing in the Great Lakes by this time.

I don’t care that it’s February, but the number of subsequent days with temperatures over 50 degrees in the sixth bor0 tells me it is spring–or has been.

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Notice the difference between Severn and Fort Schuyler?  Here proximity highlights the difference in height of the upper wheelhouse,

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but Severn is of the 4200 hp class and fort Schuyler, the 3000.

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Ah, the line and boom boats.

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Joan is one of the Moran “giraffe” boats and see HR Otter?

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She reminds me of the long gone Odin.

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Here’s a closer-up of the HR Otter, a name that immediately conjures up Kenneth Grahame.

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Some different pairs are possible here, and they’d be the same.

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See the pair there?

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a pair of hands.  Is there a word for the painted design centered on the bow of some vessels, like figureheads but not?

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Hope they clap for mardi gras!

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Land mass area can be quantified in square miles, but I’d love to work with a mathematician to measure the area within NYC limits which is navigable, i.e., the sixth boro.  Of course, “navigable” would need defining too. Immeasurable, of course, is the number of photos  taken daily of vessels with the sixth boro.

Like this one of Crystal Cutler pushing

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Patricia E. Poling westbound at the Brooklyn Bridge.

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Taft Beach pushes BMLP 703 and 305 in the opposite direction.   Also working recently have been

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Paul Andrew with scrap,

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Sarah Ann with more scrap,

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Thomas D. Witte with crane barge Columbia,

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James E. Brown with a spud barge,

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and Fort Schuyler in various locations.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated, here’s an interesting video on the salvage of  Modern Express . . . passed along by JM.

Also, as we near the mermaid parade, here are details on a performance to get you in the mood, an adaptation of Oscar Wilde’s the “Fisherman and his Soul.”

 

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