You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Franklin Reinauer’ tag.

I’m not disparaging, but my first thought was “just another” Vane tug heading across the bow, until

we passed and I noticed it was Charleston, which I believe is Vane’s newest tug in the sixth boro.

The new “ubiquitous” vessels on the sixth boro waterways move containerized trash.  Pathfinder is one of the tugboats assigned to this duty.   Covanta first got the contract for this business in 2013, and my first knowledge of these barges was here.

Two different generations of McAllister tugboats headed out recently, Capt. Brian A. and

Ellen.   Launched a half century apart and having a difference of almost 3000 hp, they are both working daily assisting ships in the harbor.

Janet D is a mere five years old and works in marine construction, working for the aptly named Construction and Marine Equipment Co.

Franklin Reinauer was built and christened by that name in 1984.

It appears to me here that Linda L. Miller, the truckable tug, is the prime mover, pushing Catherine C. Miller.  Click to enlarge the photo and you’ll see a handsome spread of Manhattan architecture, sans the peaks.

And let’s conclude with Mister Jim, who back in 2016 did not have the gray/red livery.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who missed the return of Atlantic Enterprise this morning, back from the work in Georgia.

I took this photo after dawn, technically, and what detail of tug James D Moran is lost because of low light is somewhat compensated for by the lights of the boats and on the Brooklyn background.

Ditto . . . a few minutes later, the lights are dramatic as James D passes the illuminated IMTT facility.

Evelyn Cutler passed a bit later;  light was still low from an overcast sky.

JRT Moran heads back to base, the sky is still overcast, wind brisk, and standing around taking photos was cold.

Paula Atwell is quite common here, but usually the boat is obscured by the containerized garbage she pushes.

Navigator passed with her barge . . .  and the sun I’d wished for was still not forthcoming.

Barry Silverton . . . pushing a deeply-loaded Fight ALS toward the Sound.  Here’s a document I’d never seen in its entirety explaining the Harley “naming” project.  It turns out that Mr. Silverton was a victim of ALS.  What I thought was a one-off vessel naming is actually a fleet-wide enterprise.  For example, Dr. Milton Waner is named for a pioneer in the treating of hemangiomas.

Franklin Reinauer, passing Nave Ariadne, has operated with that name–I believe–since she first came off the ways.

Marjorie B McAllister waits alongside New Ability to assist an incoming container vessel.

which Capt Brian A. McAllister is already assisting.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who at this point had the luxury of having some indoor work to attend to while warming up.

When the temperatures drop and days are short, tug and barges units in the NE get busier than in summer.

RTC 42 here gets pushed by Franklin Reinauer, as Gracie-above–waits at the dock with RTC 109.

 

A bit later, J. George Betz moves her barge B. No. 210 toward the east.

Navigator appears from the east with her barge.

 

Barney moves Georgia toward a Bayonne dock, with assistance from Mary.

 

And Curtis comes in with RTC 81 for more product.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, currently in the state of Georgia, but a few days back when I took these, needed some of that fuel to stay warm. Here from 2007 was my first post by this name.

For folks who’ve been watching sixth boro traffic much longer than I have, Lyman must conjure up a sense of ressursction that I don’t have whenever I see the profile.  Then called Crusader, she was tripped by her barge and sank just over 30 years ago.  I’ve almost always seen her with

barge Sea Shuttle, towing sections of subs. For a spectacular view of this tow in the East River seven years ago click here.

Rockefeller University’s River Campus makes an unusual backdrop here for Foxy 3.   See the support structure for the campus being lifted from the River here.

Treasure Coast . . .  offhand, do you know the build date?

Carolina Coast,

with sugar barge Jonathan, which you’ve seen some years ago here as Falcon.

Pearl Coast with a cement barge off the Narrows remaking the tow to enter the Upper Bay.

In the rain, it’s Genesis Victory and Scott Turecamo, and their respective barges.

Franklin Reinauer heads out with RTC 28, and heading in it’s

Kimberly Poling with Noelle Cutler.

And let’s stop here with JRT assisting Cosco Faith.

All photos recently by Will Van Dorp, who’s been inland for a week now and sees Shelia Bordelon on AIS at the Stapleton pier this morning.   Anyone get photos?

 

 

 

To continue on from yesterday’s list . . . I’ve done chugster, jetster, even a gangster . . . though you have to search for it here by scrolling a bit,  but the blog is called tugster, and I’m proud of that some chuckles notwithstanding . . . .

This is a cross section for the 250th time, a random sampling of what tugboats were working in the Upper Bay of NYC aka the sixth boro on a given morning earlier this week.   By the way, the 001 version of this title dates from October 2007.

Vane Brothers boats and barges abound.

Hunting Creek stands by a set of four of them, while

Wye River travels light past the ferry racks.

Franklin Reinauer travels light past the count-defying load of containers on a ULCV over in Global.

ATB Freeport and Chemical Transporter transfer cargo over at the east end of IMTT, at

the same time

Scott Turecamo and New Hampshire do.

CF Campbell stands by with Long Island.

 

And passing an unusual but new landmark along the sixth born margins,

Patrice McAllister makes her way west.  Quick . . . name a larger global garment retailer than H & M, and what the initials H & M expand to?  Answers here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose fingers froze and cold tears flowed while having the float-about, look-about.

 

You can read  Ice 5 or 3 or 2.  But freezing temperatures in salt water look different than in fresh water, salt ice not like lake ice, which is a topic for tomorrow. The sixth boro low temperature in the first two days of January was well above 0 F, Maine and Minnesota well into the double digits negative F, and Anchorage, a balmy 46 ABOVE, warmer than places in Florida!

But I digress, cold is cold and uncomfortable.  Polar bear plunge notwithstanding, a strong swimmer won’t last a minute in this water.

 

But work goes on . . .

with extra layers

and precautions.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who really postponed admitting the new year had arrived because–dangerously– it was more comfortable thinking otherwise.

 

I think of ROROs like Dignity Ace as being fairly large, but this juxtaposition made me re-evaluate.

So let’s let the tape tell its tale:  three vessels here are (l to r) Anthem of the Seas, YM Utmost, and Dignity Ace with respect to their length and breadth; and I realize that the photo does nothing to show loa.  It comes out as 1141′ x 162′  v.  1099′ x 140′ v.  656′ x 106.’

The two Vane tugs are 90′ x 32,’  although I know it’s Fort McHenry alongside Anthem and cannot identify the tug alongside Dignity.

I’m guessing the fishing boat anchored here is about 20′ and

Franklin Reinauer is 81′ x 27.9 . . . .

And since we’re doing numbers . . . from the “globe” atop the “sky arm” to the water . . . that’s 300.’

That puts some perspective on scale of some sixth boro traffic.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Lucy Reinauer, according to Birk’s site–has an interesting history, acquired by one of her owners from lottery winnings.

She came off the ways in 1973, from Jakobson, source of many older boats in the sixth boro.

Franklin is a few years older, built in Louisiana, and formerly called Ocean Tower and Matthew Tibbett‘s, both names now used on other boats.

Meredith C. Reinauer is a 7200 hp behemoth, here pushing

RTC 150.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp

Another day I went out and lots of Reinauer boats were around, like Gracie M., which I’d not seen up close.  Launched in the second half of 2016, she’s the fourth of their Twins series and the newest vessel in  the fleet.   Here’s the first Twins post I did and here’s another where she appears.

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Curtis has slightly less hp than Gracie M and follows the B. Franklin line.  

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Christian came by;  at 7200 hp  and dimensions of 118′ x 40′, she’s a big boat.

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Here’s Christian in profile.

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Zachery is one of the oldest in the fleet, built at Matton up near the Canal, and formerly a Mobil tug.

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Now that we have a few different classes already in this post, you can see that Dean, like Gracie M, follows the Twins class.

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B. Franklin, mentioned earlier, spawned Curtis, so to speak.

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And here’s another slightly different angle on Gracie M. 

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The photo below I took in Auguast 2006.  Subtle differences are visible in the background, like the color of the cranes over in Erie Basin.  The slightly different shade of bronze and red may be due to the fact that I used a different camera.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Please read the El Faro Relief event notice at the end of this post.  TODAY is the deadline to sign up.

It’s rained most of this week and last . . . and the forecast is the same for next week, but that just means sheltering (and wiping) the lens of the camera, as needed.    I wonder if John Huibers knows something we need to pay attention to . . .  but that’s another story.

For now, I noticed a lot of Reinauer boats the other day, like  . . . the 1971 Matton-built Zachery Reinauer,

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interrupted by the 1960 Blount-built Eric R. Thornton with the best logo in the sixth boro,

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the 1984 Rayco Ship and Main Ironworks Franklin Reinauer,

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the 1983 Cenac Shipyard-built Stephen B,

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the 1967 Main Iron Works Jill Reinauer,

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the 1966 Allied Shipyard Brian Nicholas,

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1973 Jakobson Lucy Reinauer,

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the 2010 G and S Marine Incorporated Crystal Cutler,

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the 2011 Senesco Reinauer Twins.

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and the 1978 Eastern Dawn, though I know not the builder.  And it appears to the the 1947 Harbor II alongside, though I noticed that almost too late.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s been evading raindrops.

Anyone have more info on the previous Lucy Reinauer, the 1943 Odenbach Shipbuilding M/T?  Birk has this photo, but I’d love to see some more and to know what became of her.

And here’s a note from the organizers of the El Faro fundraiser event:  “On Sunday,  May 15th from 12-2 at Club Macanudo we will be holding a fundraiser for the families affected by the loss of the El Faro. All proceeds will go to the Seamen’s Church Institute El Faro Relief Fund. Pricing is $75.00 per person with Beer and Wine being served. Email me at Goodwindmaritime@hotmail.com. Please see the attached flier (the link in the first sentence above).
Please send your checks as soon as possible.   Make the checks out to Good Wind Maritime Services and mail to Good Wind Maritime Services 14451 25th Drive, Flushing, NY 11354″

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