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I’m happy to lead with two photos Lydia Wong took last September when CMA CGM T. Roosevelt arrived on her first voyage into the sixth boro.  Like “new car smell” T. Roos carried an atypically uniform CMA CGM container load, at least along the edges; they’re ALL blue.

When Lydia took these, I was somewhere on Lake Michigan or its edges.  Since then, T. Roos arrived three more times, but it happened in the dark hours, or I was either away or distracted.

So last week, I was ready to camp out just to get these photos.  A camp out was unnecessary, the weather was mild, and –although cloudy–the light was not half bad.

First thing I noticed was the typical mosaic of container color, mostly non-CMA CGM.

Joan and JRT pushed her stern around Bergen Point

while James pulled on the bow;

Margaret did what all was needed on the starboard side.

For comparison, here’s a post I did a little over a year ago of a smaller CMA CGM vessel rounding this bend.

 

Traffic was light, so I got onto Brooklyn turf before she cleared the Narrows.

CMA CGM’s fleet of 74 ULCS, i.e., ultra large container ship, one carrying more than 10,000 boxes, ranks it third;  currently the largest fleet of ULCS is MSC (90), with Maersk in second place with 86 ULCS.  Here’s more detail on those numbers.

Thanks to Lydia for use of her photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp, who can’t help but imagine that ULCS must be a near-rhyme with “hulks” in its gargantuan meaning.

 

 

Ivory Coast

Christian Reinauer

Ross Sea

C. Angelo

Scott Turecamo, New Hampshire, and Brendan Turecamo

Curtis and RTC 82

Mary Alice and Nan Lin Wan

Pearl Coast and Cement Transporter 1801

MSC Maureen, Jonathan C. Moran, and Kirby Moran

All photos taken in April 2018 by Will Van Dorp.

 

What does a 70+ degree temperature day in February in the sixth boro look like?  Well . . . see for yourself.  Cornell light and likely back from a TOAR training, rafts up to Mary Whalen in Atlantic Basin.

Along the Brooklyn shore, there was Genesis Glory with GM11105.

Brooklyn–ex-Labrador Sea–light was headed for the Kills.

An anchored Crystal Cutler stood by with Patricia E. Poling.  Over in the distance is Malik al Ashtar, another 13,000+ teu container ship.  See Crystal light, high and dry here.

Over near the foot of Atlantic Avenue, Linda Lee Bouchard stands by alongside B. No. 205.

And finally, along the BQE and Brooklyn Heights, C. Angelo with EMA  1152, the EMA standing for Express Marine, the outfit that used to deliver fuel to the sixth boro’s coal-fired plants.  Express Marine tugs Consort and Escort used to be regulars in the port.  I believe they are currently “laid up.”

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

You can find the first eight installments here.

Little C is a relatively seldom seen harbor tug

dedicated to Warren George projects.

Coal?

Navigator these days has been pushing coal around the harbor, coal as I understand it thanks to ws–a frequent commenter here–that

was previously intended as fuel to the now-retired Hudson Generation Station.

Transport of some of the coal out of the sixth boro has been performed by SBI Jive;  from here, the vessel’s traveled to Rotterdam, then Ust-Luga on the Baltic.

Photos by Will Van Dorp; thanks to ws for following the coal.

As to SBI Jive, she has fleet mates with gambolling names like SBI Macarena, SBI Swing, SBI Zumba, SBI Reggae, SBI Mazurka, SBI Samba, SBI Capoeira . . . and more.

First, thanks to Joseph Chomicz . . . it’s Rebel and Dolphin over by the Philadelphia Navy Yard   . . .

Quo vadis, Rebel?

And the second batch comes from Ingrid Staats with likely the most unusual backstory ever on this blog . . .  Ingrid took the photos from a room in New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where her healthy baby was born. She writes, “We had an amazing view of the East River and for four days as Mom & babe recuperated. I amused myself by capturing as many tugs as possible.”    Congratulations to all and here they are:

Sea Lion above moving recyclables and and Evelyn Cutler pushing petroleum product.

TJ and Catherine Miller . . . and is TJ really doing all the work here?

And finally . . . Navigator light and Gulf Enterprise pushing a petroleum barge westbound.

Many thanks to Joseph and Ingrid for these photos.  And I’m happy to hear that one of the next generation of tugboat watchers has been born.

 

Sometimes I like to start new categories so that the numbers don’t get so high, boats no longer extant or frequent get a second look, and we realize that time is passing pretty fast.  So all the photos here I took more than seven years ago.  Some have been on the blog before, but not together and not edited exactly as they are now.

Like Norwegian Sea, she used to be a wintertime staple running up the River, easily recognizable by her upper wheelhouse.

Juliet is still around but not very busy under her new name . . . it seems.

This boat, like her namesake, is gone too soon. Pegasus is still around but no longer looks this way.

Zeus was on the Great Lakes after working in the sixth boro, but I’ve lost track of her.

Volunteer, another unmistakable profile, now long time gone from here.

Zachery  . . . still around and still working. High Peace is now registered Vietnamese and goes by Pvt Dolphin.

Just to break the pattern here, here’s a photo I took of Zachery a few days ago.

Take my word for this last photo . . . the distant unit I can’t identify although I’m guessing a Reinauer boat, but the closer vessel is outrageous.  Actually I mean Outrageous.  That’s the name.  Click here (and scroll) for a previous photo of Outrageous, which I believe used to be based in the sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Quick.  Name this unit . . . or at least the current and previous operators?

I haven’t seen many Gateway Towing tugs along my usual haunts, but here’s Connecticut.

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Nanticoke, about 10-years-old now, the second of the Patapsco 4200 hp class, pushes a payload enclosed in Doubleskin 305.

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Pacific Reliance, at the dock, is made up to the 650-1, whose capacity is 155,000 bbl.

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So . .  that unit in the top photo is Genesis Vision, formerly Superior Service

pushing GM 6508. Here was a photo of the tug as Superior Service, only four years ago.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And if you have not seen it yet, here’s an 18-minute video of the saga of the former Katie G and Colleen McAllister, which I captured the first hours of here as they headed east on the East River on their long journey to western Michigan. Here was my Part 2 of that voyage, with collaboration from colleagues.

Here from eight years ago is Katie G moving petroleum product and remaking a tow right off the Battery.

By 1330 Tuesday, we docked at West Point, the first non-red pushpin in yesterday’s map.   Working backward, we saw Tappan Zee II at the TZ, as we did

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the Left Coast Lifter.

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Off the Palisades, we saw Sarah D;

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in Wallabout Bay, C. Angelo;

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at the southern end of Narragansett Bay, Dace Reinauer; and

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and Suomigracht with Cape Wind turbine blades,

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and soon after departing Warren, we saw Buckley McAllister.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is posting these without any alterations.  We saw much more as well.  Cheers.

This series handles my miscellaneous needs with updates, follow-ups, and oddments.

Let’s start with the mage below.  Click on it and you’ll learn how soon a sixth boro GUP vessel transforms into dive attraction named Lady Luck.  Thanks to Mike Hatami for passing along this info.

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If the image below looks like a boat, it is, or it was before San Francisco grew (or tumbled?)  over top of it.  For more info on the buried vessels of SF, click on the image.  Here’s more.

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Below, well that was me about 10 years ago.  After I had built a skin-on-frame kayak, I need to paint the porous “skin” with urethane, hence the respirator.  If anyone’s interested in buying me a token of appreciation to update this vessel–which I still have–click on the image to see my one-item wish list.  And thanks in advance.

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More old business . . . the photo below I took from the Manhattan side of the East River about 10 years ago, and

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this photo was taken by Robert Silva back in September 2014; of course this was what remained of the John B. Caddell after Hurricane Sandy, the suspense,  and the subsequent auction.

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By now, that old steel may have seen the hold of a scrapper like Atlantic Pearl . . . and been transformed in the heat

And finally, in response to a recent comment asking about Gateway tugs . . . the rest of the photos/text here I took/wrote in April 2014 and never posted because I was waiting for some additional info.

“What’s under the ‘white house’ here?

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Click here to find out.   And the tug C. Angelo is resplendent in the brightening daylight.

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So this is future defense works passing obsolete defense works.”

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C. Angelo in drydock?

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All photos except the top three and the one by Robert Silva . . .  by Will Van Dorp.

Here was 55.

Glenn Raymo took this photo in Germantown yesterday, the all-new Sarah D; previously I used these photos by Glenn.  Check out an example of one of many of his zazzle products here.

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Sarah D until very recently was Helen D. Coppedge.  Almost all these photos were taken by other people, but I add the next two I took in 2010 for comparison purposes.

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Also, new–as in out-of-the-shipyard new . . . it’s Barry Silverton, with the Fight ALS barge.  Click here for the story of the names. Many thanks to Allen Baker–click here for previous photos he’s shared– for this photo and to

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Ted Bishop for the photo below.

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This photo comes thanks to Renee Lutz Stanley.  It’s Lyman–I think–looking insignificant in one of the huge graving docks at the Brooklyn Navy yard.  Click here for previous photos by Renee.  Anyone know which dock this is?

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With news of a wooden boat found under a house during a construction project in Highlands NJ still –well news– what you see below are photos of another wooden vessel found during a construction project in Boston.  Many thanks to Tom Mann for these photos.  Here are previous photos from Tom.

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As soon as imaging is complete, it will be removed.

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Archeologists at the site believe it was a 19th century vessel delivering lime.

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Many thanks to Tom, Renee, Ted, Allen, and Glenn for photos used here.

Related:  Here’s a story about a shipwreck discovered during construction of WTC1.

 

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