You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘ships’ category.

Carl Sandburg said:  “The fog comes  . ..  on little cat feet.

It sits looking  . . . over harbor and city . . . on silent haunches

And then moves on.”

 

My unrehearsed version is :  “The old cat once . .  . patrolled the wharf
Now it sits over the sunlight . . . and sheds on the riverbanks
masking the distances.”

What I really mean is that taking photos on limited visibility day like yesterday benefits from heightened foreground details in comparison.
Jennifer Turecamo heads out to Gravesend Bay along with the USCG patrol vessel.

A tanker arrives with a name

that’s ironic on a few levels .  .

Meagan Ann hauls Witte 4002 out to dump and

Mary Alice returns Witte 4004 from HARS before Meagan Ann  returns.

And Barney Turecamo comes into port a bit while the barge is monitored by Jennifer.

To finish, here’s another shot of Combi Dock 1 arriving from China with lots of sea miles logged….

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Recall the BOLO post?  Well, today out of the fog she arrived, albeit with an errand to run upriver first.

After a six-week run from Shanghai, of which about five days has been northbound from Colon, Panama, she checked into the Ambrose Channel this afternoon.

 

Dangling anchor means she’ll probably anchor before proceeding.

Unless I’m proven to have a fake story here, in the next few weeks we’ll see

Peking lose her restlessness and

float onto this long cargo deck.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I didn’t want to overload yesterday’s post, so I’m continuing it here.

08:44

To add a detail here, each time a ship or boat big or small approached, someone up there sounded an aerosol can horn;  once the vessel passed, a second “all clear” blast was made.

And whereas larger vessels stayed the middle of the channel, smaller ones like Jessica Ann prudently avoided the center of the channel above which the bridge work was happening.

08:45

 

08:46

08:59

Just a bit more info on the ship . . . she’s not that large (997′ x 131′) although I don’t know her air draft.  She’s not new . . .

launched in 2003 as Maersk Kolkata. as you can see from the remnant seven-pointed star. 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

With apologies all around . ..  I am tardy in posting some of the photos I enjoy getting from you all readers. Tardiness . . . my only argument is that I am very busy with projects that will come out at some point.

Like this one that Ted M sent in response to my Turmoil post some weeks ago.  Jason Reinauer is towing Turmoil–an older iteration– astern.  I believe I saw Acadian Freedom in Chelsea last year, but don’t have a photo to prove it.  Here’s what I did put up from that reconnoitre.

And thanks to Jed, here’s Pearl Coast, taken recently, and

photo 4 MARCH 2017

Pati R Moran, taken not so recently.

photo date 16 OCT 2008

I once had photos of the green boat below and below, but I think I deleted them out of frustration of NOT being able to determine its history.  It stood here in the Brooklyn Navy Yard for a while, but scuttlebutt is that it has been scrapped. These next four photos come thanks to Paul Strubeck, busy with projects of his own.

Can anyone fill in any of the blanks as related to this green boat?

Paul also made a trip around part of Lake Michigan recently and took these photos in Green Bay–GL Texas and North Dakota

and below the bow of Stewart J. Cort, my guess is Minnesota and Oklahoma.  The GL tugs are really amazing, with combined thousands of years of work.  As to Cort, she’s back at work, bow that the Great Lakes has reawakened.

 

The Maraki crew is underway again also, in the Bahamas, but before leaving panther land, which generated these and these unusual photos, they got these photos of Rikki S and

Jane.

 

Thanks again to Ted, Jed, Paul, and the Maraki crew for these photos.  how does the French saying . . . (mien vast hard due jambs.   eh?)   Wow, that’s what autocorrect did with my foreign language.  I’ll try again:  Mieux vaut tard que jamais.

If you want to see what I’ve done with this title in the past, click here.

I’ll reveal this set of photos without explaining what’s going on.  Check out the six people in this photo.  They divide into two groups by “uniform,” but how are they related?

 

I might add that these photos are shown in reverse chronological order.

 

See the two men (or one of them at that moment) atop the superstructure in the photo below?

Now we’re moving forward in time again.

 

So the two groups of six total men in the top photo have nothing to do with each other.  The ship’s crew wearing orange were simply photographing the bridge work, demolition at this point.  I can’t say if they communicated, but my guess is that at their closest they were within 50 feet of each other.

 

All photo by Will Van Dorp.

 

Surprises can be ranked in degrees.  Here was a surprise . . . people walking way up on the Bayonne Bridge back in 2011.  Ditto here I was looking into a hot tub on the stern of a scrap-carrying bunker (photo#7).

The surprises in this post emerge slowly.

dscf3320

This PCTC has been on this blog before, as has Kirby Moran.

dscf3327

That it’s called Don Juan was surprising the first time I saw it, but this line names some of its vessels after characters from opera, so Don Juan fits.

dscf3328

But the detail below–just forward of the radomes– blew me away.  In fact, when I took the photo, I had no idea what it was, maybe some netting, I imagined.  But a painted-on bower?  Or is it painted on . . . maybe it’s real bougainvillea?  Is there a Don Juan aboard who uses this as his love nest?  Here’s stanza XVIII from Lord Byon’s epic Don Juan Canto 1:

Perfect she was, but as perfection is
Insipid in this naughty world of ours,
Where our first parents never learned to kiss
Till they were exiled from their earlier bowers,
Where all was peace, and innocence, and bliss,[b]
(I wonder how they got through the twelve hours),
Don José, like a lineal son of Eve,
Went plucking various fruit without her leave.

dscf3332

Next . . . even stranger, I think.  See TS Kennedy over next to the GMD Graving Dock and Anthem of the Seas out beyond that?  Surprise?

Version 2

A giraffe?!  !@#!

dscf3298-1

Maybe it’s an amusement.  Maybe it’s a stand-in for emergency drills?  I went looking and found out about Gigi.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

It seemed just a few weeks ago I’d seen her, but it was just over 60 days, the time it takes to get from the sixth boro to China and back.  But there she was passing Robbins Reef Light.

dscf3033

Starboard and

dscf3039

port, she was controlled,

dscf3038

starboard, port, and

dscf3041

 

dscf3048

 

dscf3049

more.

dscf3054

 

dscf3059

Evergreen was founded by Chang Yung-Fa with a single ship in 1968.

dscf3060

Anyone visit their maritime museum in Taipei City?

dscf3063

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

A week and a bit ago just after noon one day,

dscf3101

I caught CMA CGM Moliere heading for Port Elizabeth

dscf3099

 

dscf3105

and the next morning just before 9, I caught her bound for sea.

dscf3111

I’ve no idea how many boxes were shifted, but that’s not a lot of time in port.

dscf3118

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who thinks you might be interested in reading this Workboat article about the new fleet of passenger boats heading from MetalShark to the sixth boro soon.

 

Grace is a 113,000 dwt tanker delivered less than a year ago by the Guangzhou Shipyard, north of Hong Kong and China’s third largest city.  

pf1

Is this the look of future tankers in the sixth boro?

pf2

Jonathan C. assists her from her berth.  I may be mistaken, but 10 years ago, few if any cargo vessels of this size called in the sixth boro.

pf3

Ten years ago there were also no 6000 hp assist tugs in the port.

pf4

 

pf5

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here for a Navig8 vessel in our fair port from nine years ago.

Until 2015, this would have been one of the largest K Line vessels, at nearly 1100′.  Then, the next year, a new series came out, at 1197.’

dscf2779

Marjorie B takes the port side stern,

dscf2780

 

dscf2781

 

dscf2784

while Patrice tied on three football fields forward.  Click here for my first view of Patrice McAllister, almost five years ago, after a tragic fire on Lake Ontario.

dscf2785

They make the turn and line up

dscf2787

 

dscf2790

for the high point of the Bayonne Bridge.  See the crew watching the underside of the old road bed?

dscf2794

 

dscf2797

Erin minds the stern for the time being.

dscf2800

 

dscf2802

And then Hanoi Bridge heads for at least two more US stops before making for the Pacific.

dscf2819

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,135 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

May 2017
M T W T F S S
« Apr    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031