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Random, but mostly a celebration of orange.  Click here and you’ll see how obsessive i’ve been about these juice tankers.  More even than about wine tankers, which I’ve no knowledge of ever seeing.  Milk tankers, you ask?  Well, if you mean the ones that travel from farm to processing/bottling plant, I’m familiar with them but no pics.

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Shanghai Trader came in the same day.

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Orange Sun, operated by Atlanship SA, was involved in an incident near here back in 2008.

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Stealth Berana, here with Scott Turecamo and New Hampshire lightering, seems to have undergone a name-change recently.

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Back to the juice tanker, it seems that fewer than a dozen of these vessels carry one-fourth of the world supply!

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Here’s another shot of Caroline Oldendorff with ABC-1 at stern starboard quarter and Nicholas Miller passing along port.  Go, Nicholas.

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Aleuropa is another operator of juice tankers.  Carlos Fischer is one of their vessels.

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Zim Tarragona is named for an ancient port.

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A juice tanker called Southern Juice was renamed to the last three letters of its name  “ICE” for its trip to Bangladesh breakers beach.  See the story here on p. 19/20.

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The salt bulker Aghia Skepi is named for a Greek Orthodox holy day.

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Finally, Orange Sun  . . . you’d think it would have an orange hull, like the Staten Island ferry in the background, right?

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All photos of the sixth boro activities by Will Van Dorp.

“Backing down” is a term I’ve heard used to describe a ship assist in which the tugboats control the sternwise movement of a vessel away from a dock.  Most of the work here seems to be tide current driven, if I saw it right.

Let’s pick this up at 16:28 hrs.

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The evolution waits for incoming traffic, in this case Seoul Express, which I watched getting backed down half a decade ago here and here.  Margaret Moran was involved that time as well.

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At 16:49, Seoul Express, accompanied by Kirby Moran, is passing and Margaret throttles up, catching

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the attention of a crew member on the superstructure of Seoul Express.

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By 16:51, Heina is well away from the dock, and now

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James D.Moran needs to get the stern out, but I’m not well placed to capture that.

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Margaret moves around to the bulb.  I love how the load markings mimic the tug profile.

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By 16:58, Heina is at least two ship lengths east of the salt dock, and

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by 17:07, Heina has begun to rotate counterclockwise in preparation to head under the VZ Bridge out to sea.  By now, she’s south of the Bahamas.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, to whose untrained eyes this all seemed to evolve with masterful control.

As to the meaning of “heina,” try this.

Here and here are previous posts in this spirit, but first, the answer to yesterday’s bridge identification question . . . Joseph Chomicz nailed it . . . it’s Outerbridge Crossing, named for a person of commerce.

Today’s question is:  as you look through the photos in this post, can you think of a type of cargo that seems to be missing in the sixth boro in recent months?

In the photo of the self-unloader below, Outerbridge Crossing is seen from the south side, not from directly below.

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Although the light is not ideal in the photo below, this is the stern of the self-unloader Caroline Oldendorff, poised to auger salt off to a pile between the oil tanks.

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I like the effect of the flag in front of the spare wheel.  I last saw Caroline on the Mississippi here.

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Here’s an unusual tugster perspective . . . Eagle Madrid leaving the south end of the AK, passing Perth Amboy and

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snaking through the channel across Raritan Bay;  that’s Brooklyn in the background to the right.

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Here’s another unusual tugster perspective . . . Sea Halcyone (formerly Unique Sunshine) passing Shooters Island as seen from Faber Park.

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Note Margaret Moran assisting to port, and a (mothballed??) Liberty IV still on the hard to the left, and several raucous gull drones doing some pilotage.  Maybe?

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Here JPO Pisces gets overtaken by Tangier Island before

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passing MSC Katya R, who’s

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seen in by JRT Moran.

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Heina, although no self-unloader, is discharging the same cargo as Caroline Oldendorff had in her holds:  salt.

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So which cargo seems to be missing . . . in recent months?  My perception is orange juice, my favorite drink.  Have I just been missing the ships, or is there a change in the supply chain?

Again, congrats to Joseph for naming the bridge in yesterday’s post.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’ve not used this title in too long, so here it is, a general cargo ship . . . because not everything fits inside a container.

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Ellen McAllister escorts Wilson Newcastle outbound

Nor does everything require a huge ship.

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hn I saw Wilson Newcastle the other day, I knew I’d seen a Wilson vessel once before.

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I just didn’t think I had to go back almost four years.  It’s not exactly identical;  Newcastle is more than a decade more recent and has 25% greater capacity.  .

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Bruce A. McAllister escorts Wilson Saga into the Navy Yard.

 

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Today’s photos were taken less than a month ago by Ingrid Staats, who writes, “I grew up on the Hudson River and I love getting your blog posts! Here’s some pics from my last trip upstate 1/30– looking north toward Albany, there’s two tugs waiting to greet Champion Istra.  One is Frances Turecamo.  She went past [the tanker], then turned around and escorted her on the stern while the other one led her bow

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About three hours later I saw BBC Tennessee come up. So much action on the river these days ….”

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As you know, I enjoy collaborations on this blog, and then I do my own poking around.  If the shipspotting info is correct, BBC Tennessee called so briefly in Albany–between a stop in Newport News and Philadelphia–that it doesn’t even show.  As of this morning, March 2, she’s inbound Rio de la Plata for Buenos Aires.

Champion Istra is currently in midAtlantic, westbound from Denmark, headed for Philadelphia.

Many thanks to Ingrid for these photos, which offer insights into Hudson River shipping connections.

Back in mid-January, I’d planted myself up in Fort Wadsworth to see a new ship come in.  While I was there, I saw this CMA CGM vessel leave, racing this sailboat.

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As the sailboat passed, I caught the name, which certainly made me wonder who Ratty is and what wisdom Ratty possesses other than leaving town a few days before the big snowstorm hit.

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Whatever the answers to those questions are, Rattys Wisdom is now in the Bahamas, likely a milder place than the sixth boro.

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And completely unrelated, back five and a half years ago, bowsprite saw a strange trimaran, Soundbounder identified it, and I alluded to it here and kept wondering about it.  Here was an article about the vessel from 2010.   Here’s an article I just found from almost a year ago suggesting it may no longer exist . . .   The place Zamna sank is near the long pier in Progreso, Mexico, once associated with Yucatan sisal, favorite at different times of farmers and sailors.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Also unrelated, while the winds were howling last night, here’s what was developing off Rockaway.

 

Here are previous posts in this series.

When I saw a parade of Moran tugs heading to meet a ship or some ships, I suspected something large was coming.

And when she appeared around the bend, she did look quite large,

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Cosco Napoli did, and much as I wanted to keep my hands in my pockets, I took the photos I could.

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Kirby Moran (6000 hp) assisted.  I’m not sure if Margaret Moran (3000 hp)–to starboard–was assisting also.

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and JRT Moran (6000 hp) was back there . . .

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That’s a total of 15,000 tugboat hp, i.e., 11,185 kW, I believe.  Cosco Napoli‘s engine is rated at 69,620 kW, which converts to 93,362 hp, if I used the correct horsepower conversion, and I know how complicated the “horsepower” is.

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So, for some more numbers:  Cosco Napoli, capacity of 8000+  teu.  1099′ loa x 137′ x 45′

Comparing this container vessel to the largest one recently arrived in Oakland and Long Beach, CMA CGM Ben Franklin is 63,910 kW, 18,000+ teu, and 1309′ x 177′ x 37.’

Here’s another comparison, CSCL Indian Ocean recently grounded on the Elbe . . . her numbers look like this:  69,720 kW, 19,000+ teu, and 1311′ x 192′ x  39.’

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I admit to feeling a thrill.   There were rainbows in the upper bay, here falling past the Liberty statue and raining onto Liberty Island,

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drama loomed as Atlantic Star was back in the Ambrose on the return from the Norfolk and Baltimore, Firefighter II was also outside the Narrows,

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I could get the closeups,

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clouds were dissipating at just the right moment,

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Eric McAllister met the Star on the Con Hook Range,

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there was even a private sailboat–Ratty’s Wisdom–that possibly carried VIPs . . . .  but nothing happened!  I had built this up too much for myself, and no sprayed salute occurred.

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I’ll keep a watch . . . it has to happen one of these times.  Maybe it’s not proper, since Atlantic Star has not yet seen its Liverpudlian christening yet.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I’d thought this tanker was part of the Eagle fleet . . . although occasionally I’d wondered if there might be this laker connection, too.   Maybe if I’d been more familiar with a certain border region in the US quite far away from the sixth boro, I would have grasped the name immediately . . .   Answer follows, if you don’t know.  Also, how many McAllister boats can you spot here?

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Did you get this one?  Can you identify it now that you’ve seen the first two photos?

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This one is Robert E., leaving the other as quite likely Ellen.

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And another question–this one from long-time reader WS–what connection has Eagle Ford with El Faro?

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That’s the Seabulk logo.

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EagleFord and El Farro were both built at Sun Shipbuilding, as hull #668 and 670, respectively.   Thanks to WS for pointing this out.

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And Eagle Ford . . . it’s a town in Texas that’s associated with oil shale.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Icy roads are here again.  Well, even if they’re not–not yet– in the downstate area, New Yorkers place a value on being prepared.  You might call that a NY value, but I’m not going any further there.  And more accurately, preparing for the future is a universal value.

And in this season, bulkers arrive with beautiful names like Lake Dahlia and with holds filled with dozens of thousands of tons of “de-icer,” this load being off a desert in Chile.  A previous ship had come from this part of Mexico.

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In less than a handful of hours after “all fast,” clamshells start discharging at the rate of 30 tons per scoop.

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Two operations happen simultaneously . . . cranes empty the holds and

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loaders fill the trucks.

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When that ice starts coating the roadways,

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you and all the others thousands of drivers have a lot

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better chance of staying on track to

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your intended destination.  The photo below suggests it’s coming time for another truckster post.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

Many thanks to Brian DeForest of Atlantic Salt.

 

 

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