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On April 11, 2008, I took this photo of lube tanker Manhasset.  I don’t believe I’ve posted this photo before.  I did post two others here.

The set below shows the same vessel a bit over 11 years later, with a crane added near the bow and an extended supply shelter forward of the superstructure.

Manhasset has been renamed Louis C.  Note the operator’s seat to the port side of the crane.

 

She came into the dock to self-load a spud,

hidden from my vantage point.

Lube tanker to small crane ship . . .   is quite the transformation.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who published more photos of this 1958 Pascagoula-built vessel here.

First, from Kyle Stubbs, three Vane tugs  (Elizabeth Anne, Hudson, and Delaware alongside DoubleSkin 501) which would not be that unusual on this blog, except he took the photo in Seattle over by Terminal 5.  Click here for previous photos from Kyle.

Leaping south to the Mexican port of Manzanillo–north of Lazaro Cardenas–it’s VB Yucatan, in between  CMM Jarocho. and CMM Maguey. 

Not a tugboat, but also in Manzanillo .  . it’s Elizabeth Oldendorff, a gearless differently-geared sister of Alice.

In the center of the photo below, I’m unable to identify this Grupo TMM tug. 

Heading up the Hudson River, here’s an oldie-but-goodie, Ronald J. Dahlke.  Photo was taken about a month ago by Willard Bridgham in Waterford.  Anyone know where she’s gone to now?  She’s a sister of Urger and built in 1903!!

And it is that season, as this photo of Cornell by Paul Strubeck reminds us.

Thanks to Kyle, Maraki, Willard, and Paul for use of these photos.

What does a 70+ degree temperature day in February in the sixth boro look like?  Well . . . see for yourself.  Cornell light and likely back from a TOAR training, rafts up to Mary Whalen in Atlantic Basin.

Along the Brooklyn shore, there was Genesis Glory with GM11105.

Brooklyn–ex-Labrador Sea–light was headed for the Kills.

An anchored Crystal Cutler stood by with Patricia E. Poling.  Over in the distance is Malik al Ashtar, another 13,000+ teu container ship.  See Crystal light, high and dry here.

Over near the foot of Atlantic Avenue, Linda Lee Bouchard stands by alongside B. No. 205.

And finally, along the BQE and Brooklyn Heights, C. Angelo with EMA  1152, the EMA standing for Express Marine, the outfit that used to deliver fuel to the sixth boro’s coal-fired plants.  Express Marine tugs Consort and Escort used to be regulars in the port.  I believe they are currently “laid up.”

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are previous posts in this series, and here’s probably the most dramatic set of photos ever from Paul, taken January seven years ago.

Below, that’s the view of the mouth of the Rondout . . . . and the light at the end of the north breakwater, which looks so beautiful here.

Here’s a view along the deck of Cornell, when

Frances was about to pass, headed north on the Hudson,

which looks like the concrete parking lot of an abandoned shopping mall.

 

 

But commerce goes on, Katherine Walker on station

and Haggerty Girls moving heating oil.

Daisy Mae, however, is making her maiden voyage home, up to Coeymans.

Many thanks to Paul Strubeck, who sent me these photos as soon as he thawed out from the trip.

And completely unrelated, I just added a new blog to my blogroll, GirlsAtSea, started this month by a Romanian bridge officer named Diane.  Check it out here or from the blogroll.

 

On the cusp of wintriness if not winter per se, the Hudson Valley is spectacular.  Let’s start with Fred Johannsen pushing this crane barge northward.  That’s the Kingston-Rhinecliff Bridge aka George Clinton Memorial Bridge (DeWitt Clinton’s uncle)  in the distance.

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Here Treasure Coast urges Cement Transporter 7700–one I’ve never seen before–the last mile to the cement dock.

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This reflection was so magical, I needed to include this closer-up.

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Emerald Coast pushes a fuel barge downstream.

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Sarah D moves a motley pair of scows upstream.

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Eastern Dawn moves a fuel barge downstream.

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Mr Russell shifts a barge near the TZ Bridge.  What is in those tanks?

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Might that be Marion Moran pushing sugar barge Somerset up toward Yonkers?

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I believe this is Doris Moran moving cement barge Adelaide downriver.

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And as a last-but-not-least photo today, here’s Cornell conducting a TOAR sign off session.  Here’s a post I did three years ago with the same activity but using a different barge.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has a proposal below:

If you are working Thursday and therefore having lunch and/or dinner at work–whether on a vessel or in some other work setting–and you choose to take a photo of the dinner–any aspect of the meal–and send it to me, please do and I’ll try to devise a post with it on Friday this week.  Thanks for the consideration.

Also, you may be “choosing” ed out by now, but here’s a set of thoughtful, well-reasoned and -articulated perspectives on the Hudson anchorages question that is open to public discussion until early December.

Also, if you’re planning to be at the WorkBoat show in New Orleans next week,  I’ll be wandering around there, maybe looking for some extra work.  I hope to see you.

 

 

Put Cornell into the search box and you’ll see how many posts I’ve done on this 1950 Long Island-built vessel.  I even wrote an article for Professional Mariner.  Click here for more info on Cornell.

But this post just raises a question . . .if the sunrises over a calm East River and no one is there to see it,

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is it still pretty?

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I think so.  Photos taken at 0630 this morning by Will Van Dorp.

In reference to the rescue Sunday, Captain Matt Perricone of Cornell says,  “I would hope that this would be something any good mariner would do.” Read the rest of Paul Kirby’s report from Daily Freeman here.

It’s a very happy but pensive  birthday for Tugboat Cornell and crew, I’m sure.  See more media links below.

Cornell‘s been working since

1949.    Now tug and crew are also  . . . lifesavers.  And here.  Congratulations.   May she run and toot her whistles for another 61 years!!

All fotos taken in 2009 by Will Van Dorp.

Click here for one of my recent posts on Cornell.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

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