You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Bouchard Boys’ tag.

Here are all the previous “pairs” post, a direction I glanced at after seeing Bouchard Boys and Linda Lee Bouchard rafted up last weekend . . .  I’m not sure why the formation, but it certainly showed their relative size.

And once I see a pattern in one place, I start to notice it in others.  Here Otter and Pike almost appear to be in the right lane for Exit 10.   I’m eager to see Muskie and Gar.

Over in Hudson Yards below “the vessel” a pair of Schenectady’s finest EMDs hold a place in the rotation out east.

Between Montreal and Trois-Rivieres lies Lac St. Pierre, where I saw this pair.  To the right, I’ve already commented that Espada used to call in the sixth boro as Stena Poseidon.  Now I look up Laurentian–to the left–and discover she used to call in our watery boro as Palva!   If it’s about the witness protection program, the effort would be foolproof.  I’d never have seen Palva in her new color, suggesting to me that paint and color trump lines.

A report that continues to fascinate me about Lac St. Pierre is that it spawns “ice rocks,” which are rocks that become embedded in the winter ice in the shallow portions of the lake that freeze solid all the way to the lakebed, until these rocks are carried downstream encased in floating ice and become lethal targets for fast spinning propellers.  Ice rocks, what a concept!

Pairs of dug canal banks, as seen in midSeptember west of Rome, show how surveyor straight some parts of the waterway are.

Guard gates are essential canal infrastructure.

And I’ll conclude with a pair of liberty statues, one pointed east and the other west.  A few of you will know immediately where a pair of these “crowns” a building, and I’ll just wait for someone to make the identification.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who asks as treat that you share your favorite tugster post or obsession or vessel  . . . today with some friends.  Be safe.

Oh, and one of my favorites is this post I did about a Halloween-escape trip seven (!!) years ago.

 

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This post follows on one I did seven and a half years ago, here.

The first photo--Donna J. with B. No. 272— comes thanks to Jed, whose Caribbean tugs you may recently have seen here.   Donna J. is moved by two EMD R20-710G7C-T3 generating 10,000 hp.  Also notable is her fuel capacity of 301,504 gallons of fuel, which if I used the right formula, converts to 1055 metric tons of diesel.

Here are more recent Bouchard units photos starting with Jane A. with B. No. 225 on the North River,

Evening Star passing IMTT Bayonne,

Boys crossing the southern tip of Newark Bay,

Buster with B. No. 255, 

Ellen with B. No. 280 in the same anchorage same day,

Buster and Evening Mist . . . and how about the one to the left?  Guesses?

It’s Doris Moran last week.

Thanks to Jed for the photo of Donna J;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

I see this tug light so infrequently that I didn’t recognize her at first.  A clue . . . some years ago she was painted red.

That’s Bouchard Boys distancing, but can you name the approaching vessel?

This one may almost be close enough to read.

And this one has the biggest give-away colors . . . .

Evelyn Cutler used to be Melvin E. Lemmerhirt, which I remember as a noisy boat.

Ross Sea I first saw in NYC’s sixth boro as Normandy, not

the current Normandy.

McKinley Sea first appeared here as Annabelle V.

And to round this out, Foxy 3 used to be a fleet mate of Lemmerhirt, mentioned above.

All photos on a windy day last week by Will Van Dorp.

 

Barges “1” was years ago.  And here are previous posts that in some way focus on some sort of barge.  But the two photos below, which I took in May, prompt this post.  I can’t identify this Bouchard barge, but look at the size of the yard worker in comparison.

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It’s quite likely this is not one of their largest barges, but it is indeed sizable.

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The B. No. 260 is 350′ loa and slightly different design although a similar deep notch.

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The B. No. 220 is 404′ –here along with Normandy and Bouchard Boys–and

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B. No. 280 is 399′.  I’m not sure which tug is driving it.

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Frederick Bouchard here is powering B. No. 264–350′–

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Evening Tide with B. No. 262--350′– and

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the 317′ loa B. No. 250, pushed by Evening Star.  My point was how large and capacious these barges are . . . ,

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and that is measured in barrels of capacity, not feet.  For these barges then, here’s that info:

B. No. 250                    = 59,000 brls

B. No. 260, 262, 264  =  60,000

B. No. 280                    =  80,000

B. No. 220                     = 110,000 brl

 

In many situations, fuel is measured in metric tons, as covered here.

And this tangent started out with photos taken by Will Van Dorp.

0633 . . . the other morning, a quarter hour after sunrise.

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30 seconds later, at a different angle.

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It’s really about light.

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0832  The good light is gone.  Time to move on to something else.   But wait . .  are those the towers of the new Goethals Bridge along the right edge of the photo?

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

And if you missed the new NY harbor dock book info yesterday, here it is again.  The author writes, “I decided to adapt his work into book form. I left the Martin Golden byline so he would get credit for his work. I think the old names on the docks are  best feature. Most of those terminals have gone the way of the dodo, but old timers can still be heard giving security calls at Standard Tank, Copper Docks and other places not there anymore.”

Unrelated:  Did anyone catch Kirsten Grace leaving the sixth boro this weekend?  Was she towing Newtown Creek to its new life?  As of this posting, Kirsten Grace is approaching Wilmington NC.

If you have a lot of free time, you can trace this back to the first installment.

These photos are all from the past week, starting out with Bouchard Boys, 1975.

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Pelham, 1960.  Behind her is USNS Red Cloud.

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Barney Turecamo (1995) and

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Scott Turecamo (1998).

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Eric R. Thornton (1960)

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Jill Reinauer (1967) and Dace Reinauer (1968) with RTC 61.

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Add Stephen-Scott (1967) and Ruth M. Reinauer (2008) pushing RTC 102.

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Margaret Moran (1979) starting a backing-down of Heina with

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James D. Moran (2015).  More on this backing down later this week.

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Captain D (1974) with CVA-604.

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Meagan Ann (1975)

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Houma (1970).

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Frances (1957) and I think I know the crewman forward of the house.

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And finally, I put this photo here because of a boat in the background.  Is that Kristy Ann Reinauer (1962)?  I thought she was scrapped half a year ago already.  Hmm.

Other boats here are L. to r.) Realist, Kristy Ann, Hubert Bays, Long Splice, Samantha Miller, Stephen B, and Hunt Girls, which has been in the yard there for (?) two years now?

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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