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Solo and over along the Connecticut shore last week, it’s Joker, with her distinctive lines and livery.

The other dawn, Ava M. was returning from a job.  It was sunny and clear, but with all the rain of the previous day, lots of moisture remained in the air.

Taken an hour or so later, Eastern Dawn passes those same hoses and that ship, Chem Neon.

The top photo here was of a single vessel;  the next two had two each.  Beyond Christian Reinauer are two tugs and a ship to the left, and one tug to the right.

Normandy is front and center, but I count two tugs, a tanker, and a tank barge in the background.

Ditto here:  the seldom-seen (by me)  Christine M. McAllister with lots of activity in the background.

See what all is happening here:  in the foreground l to r, Kirby Moran, Treasure Coast, Miriam Moran, Sarah Ann, and Marjorie B. McAllister.  In addition, there are two tankers and a cement barge.

All photos, WVD.

And since I’ve not seen Christine M underway in quite a while, enjoy another shot below.  I count at least four vessels beyond her.

Quick . .  name those two tugs and barge?

Here’s that same barge, and the previously obscured third tug, Pegasus.

Is it possible that this is the first time I post photos of the 2015 Leigh Ann Moran?  My blog index tells me it is.

A double assist gets her gently into the IMTT dock, Pegasus and Sarah D.

 

And when the job was done,

Pegasus returned to her base,

Sarah D did the same, and

Leigh Ann appeared to go take on some fuel.

Welcome Leigh Ann, a few years late for me.

All photos, WVD.

Excuse the obscure word; it’s not one I regularly use, but concatenation, i.e., a series of interconnected things or events, random and unlikely ever to recur, came to mind as I put together this set of photos.  Follow along.  Early one morning recently, Kristin Poling made up to a loaded Eva Leigh Cutler,

and Normandy came to assist.

They eased out of the slip and turned to the west and

passed the moored crude tanker SKS Jersey.

Behind them came Bruce A. McAllister.

 

From the turn at Bergen Point, there appeared one of the Moran 6000s with Mandalay, a 2345 teu container ship launched in 2019.

Mandalay evokes much… all the way back to here.

She generally makes stops along the coast of North America and South America, hitting a port or two in the Caribbean.

As she passed between my vantage point and SKS Mersey, Morgan Reinauer heads west.

As of this posting, Mandalay, with her evocative name, is in Savannah.

All photos and perception, WVD, who has more concatenations to come.

Mornings on the KVK can be busy.

Above, Sea Fox (1971) follows Barney Turecamo (1995), and below, Kimberly Poling (1994) is followed by Mary H (1981)

Kimberly Turecamo (1980) and Marjorie A. McAllister (1974) head east to escort different incoming ships.

Chesapeake Coast (2012) assists Gulf Coast (1982) moving the cement barge out into the current.

Bruce A. (1974) and Patrice McAllister (1999) hasten out for work.

Thomas A. Witte (1961 when she was called Valoil) returns to Port Newark.

Joyce D. (2002) passes the docked Normandy (2007).

And Cape Canaveral (2019) makes for her yard.

All this and much more during a few hours one bright, mild morning recently by WVD.  Any errors, my blame.

The other morning was without wind and busy, so this next “hour” is actually 30 minutes, and these are only a few of the photos I took between 0900 and 0930 of this extraordinary morning from my single vantage point.

A team of Dann Marine tugs leave the dock, framing Nicole Leigh at the Reinauer dock.

Vane’s Brooklyn leaves her dock;  notice the Moran barn (red with the white M) and Pegasus at the Metropolitan dock.

Charles D heads to job.

Bulker Maina heads for sea, passing Elandra Blu and

Marjorie comes to retrieve the docking pilot.  Do you see four people in the photo below?  Elandra tankers are based in Latvia.

The calm here is barely broken by MSC Korea.

Brendan waits to retrieve the pilot.  Note the scrubber and its effects on emissions?

Over by IMTT  Glory and Potomac sand by with their barges.

And we’ll leave it here, actual 28 minutes elapsed . . .  name that approaching ship?

All photos, WVD.

How about a random sample, as the title says.  Afrodite, launched 2005, and dwt of 53k.  I believe that was Normandy arriving. 

Usma, not US Military Academy because that’s at West Point NY, but a 2007 tanker with a dwt of 53k.

Seameridian, 2001 and right around 50k.

Seaenvoy, same fleet as Meridian, but launched 2017 and 113k dwt.

 

In this twofer, we have Elandra Willow in the distance, a 2019 launch and 50k capacity, and MTM Santos, 2013 and 22k.

Navig8 Guard was launched in 2019 and capacity around 50k.

The “extra-large” stack houses its scrubber technology.

The oldster of the group is Bow Flora, 1998 and 37k.

She’s an Odfjell tanker. 

Lumen N, assisted by Brendan Turecamo, is 2008 and 65k.

 

And rounding out this post, with pirate-preventing guards on the rails,

it’s BW Kallang, of the huge BW fleet.

All photos, WVD.

I recall my first time seeing the KVK, astonished by the density of commercial traffic.  Of course, I’d just come from northern New England’s freshwater meandering rivers, surfable sandy coastlines, and marsh creeks. 

Patrice steamed westbound, light,

Kimberly eastbound,

Josephine,

Daisy Mae, moving a half acre of scows…

Helen Laraway,

Daisy Mae again a few seconds later.

But to put it all together, here are Pegasus, Josephine, and Cape Henry

Pegasus and Patrice,

Josephine, Kings Point, and Cape Henry….

It was a busy morning.  All photos, WVD.

 

That more tankers and fuel barges arrive in the sixth boro in the colder months is just my hunch;  maybe someone reading this can supply numbers to prove or disprove this.  It would make sense, given that there’s the need for heating.  In any case, let’s look at some vessels in town in recent months.  By the way, here was the first post of this series.   One of these is arguably misclassified here;  see if you can determine which.

Afrodite was a frequent and controversial visitor here a few years back.

 

Note the person climbing the ladder from a Millers Launch launch.  Also, can you explain the T on the bow?

Overseas Mykonos, despite its name,

is a US-flagged vessel, assisted by Mary Turecamo. However, when launched in 2010, she was registered in Majuro.  I have to admit that I need a “big picture tutorial” on shifting ship registries, aka reflagging.

In the morning light as thousands of cars make their way (upper left) along the arteries called parkways and expressways, Grand Ace9, launched in 2008,  has been here before–never on this blog though, as Eagle Miri.  I’ve not seen Eagle tankers in the harbor in years . . . possibly some of the older ones have been scrapped.

 

Maya, like Afrodite, is a TEN tanker, “TEN” expands to Tsakos Energy Navigation. See the T on the stack? Maya is of a smaller class of TEN tankers, and has switched registry from Maltese to Marshall Islands.

Orange Ocean is a regular in the port, and the only Liberian tanker in this batch.

Seapike has been here before.  For full context of this vessel, check Michael Schmidt’s site here . . . for Seabass, Seacod, Seatrout, etc. . . you get this gist. Also, note a Millers  Launch launch, maybe Emily, along the port side.

The green stripes near the bow mark this as a BW Group vessel, one of many that call in the sixth boro.

One series has names like BW Panther, BW Puma, BW Bobcat . . . you get the idea.  The founder of the company was Sir Yue-Kong Pao, who started in the family shoe business.  Although you’ve likely never heard of him, he made Newsweek’s cover in 1976.  The company is currently run by the founder’s son-in-law Peter Woo, who was on Forbes cover a few years ago. 

Rounding this post out, shown in the breadth of the Upper Bay, it’s Aegean Star.

She’s the newest of vessels in this post, launched in 2019.

All photos and research, WVD.

And if you said that Orange Ocean was misplaced here, you’d be right, since the liquid she carries is edible . . . or potable.

Megalopolis roadways see dense traffic, and so do waterways in these areas.  I hope these photos convey a sense of that.  All but two of the seven vessels are underway.  Underway vessels, l to r, are Frederick E. Bouchard, MSC Athens, Jonathan C. Moran, C. F. Campbell, and Fort McHenry.

Dense means tight quarters, Brian Nicholas looking barely larger than the bulbous bow.

Here everything is in motion.

Again, everything here is in motion.  I’m not sure what the Reinauer units there are.

All are moving here too . .   Frederick E., Pegasus, Meaghan Marie, one of the Moran 6000s, Mister T, a bit of the bow of Mary Turecamo, and CMA CGM Nabucco.

 

Sometimes a confluence of schedules make the KVK resemble rush hour.  Photos, WVD.

Having seen the forecast for December 25, I did my watch on Christmas eve.    These are the latest sunrises of the entire cycle . . . photo taken around 0745, and the sky was still reddish and offering very little light.   Fort McHenry and survey boat Christina cross. Yes, Christina . . . namesake you know who. 

Diane B was pushing John Blanche deep in the water with heating fuel.

Fort McHenry passes my station.

Ocean Endeavour was heading in ahead of the strong winds . . . or maybe just to be at the dock for Christmas.   Note the Staten Island ferry off her starboard and a tip of Twin Tube off port stern.

 

By now, it’s a little after 0800.

Twin Tube is the ultimate sixth boro Christmas boat;  there’s no Santa or reindeer, just a competent captain and enough horsepower to get alongside ships.

The reindeer . . . they’re atop the tarped salt pile.   Santa may have abandoned the sleigh, however.

All the above photos were taken before 0900.  The photo below. . .  it’s W. O. Decker, currently getting work done upriver, but ensconced between Wavertree and  work barge Progress a few years ago . .  .

All photos, WVD, who wishes you all Merry Christmas and gifts of life, health, and happiness however you find it.  And one more . .  . bravo to the Normandy crew for the decorations.

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