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As I mentioned before, the other morning brought clear bright light, along with the biting temperatures and wind.

Given windy conditions, assistance was everywhere.

I forgot to check where Lincoln Sea was arriving from, but she was headed for IMTT.  Alongside DBL 140 was Pegasus.

Sharp morning light makes for crisp shadows.

 

 

As Pegasus moves on this part of the assist, Sarah D has completed her task and moves out of the way.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Beyond Capt. Brian . . .

Stena Penguin prepares to exit the KVK for the Upper Bay and up to the Saint Lawrence.

Anchored in the Upper Bay, it’s Stenaweco Elegance and

Venus R. now both away south . . ..

Eric McAllister here passes Harbour First, and later

escorts in RHL Agilitas.

Meanwhile crude oil tanker Alpine Confidence, somewhat down by the bow, turns in the tide just inside the Narrows.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who always finds change in the sixth boro, whether it be every day or every decennial.

By the way, see Tugster Tower in the distance . . .  somewhere out there in the haze.

 

Margaret shines “brightly” over by Fort Wadsworth.

Scott Turecamo transfers commodity over at the east end of Bayonne.

I think it is Miss Julia, but I still know nothing about her.

Of the Seaboats fleet absorbed into Kirby, Weddell Sea is the only one I see these days, and here she

gets assistance to the dock from Normandy.

Gracie M. was the newest Reinauer boat at least three boats ago.

With the ongoing renewal in the Reinauer fleet, Morgan must be among the oldest boats they operate.

And I’ll never forget an tempestuous morning when first I heard Evelyn‘s sound, when she was working as Melvin E. Lemmerhirt.

And that returns us to Margaret.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I missed Josephine Reinauer (actually I saw her but couldn’t get a clear shot)  when she visited town recently, but I did catch Jacksonville, the latest Vane machine in the harbor.

For some reason I expected her to look different, but it’s an Elizabeth Anne class tug, which’ll look a lot like most of the rest of the Vane fleet.

Eric and the other McAllister escort tugs have been quite busy recently.

Ernest Campbell has been here about a half year doing bunkering, I believe.

Trevor usually works as a dredge tender, focusing on the Jersey shore this fall.

Brooklyn was called Brooklyn Service when I first discovered the sixth born.

Daisy Mae is just over a year old.

Normandy came to the sixth born from Colombia a few years ago.

Rowan has been working in the sixth boro of late.

In fact, almost seven years ago, it was Rowan that brought Patrice McAllister into the boro after the tragic fire during her delivery from the Great Lakes to this salt water.  These days, Patrice is looking great.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has heard about but not yet seen Hunter D.

 

Full disclosure . . . I’m not feeling much festive this year personally.  So maybe it’s my own wary eye that leads to my seeing so few wreaths on boats, maybe it’s just this lingering head cold.

But it warmed my heart to see them, like here

on Pegasus, and

ditto on Alex McAllister.

 

And although this is not a set of Christmas decorations per se, this would be something I’d put in my front yard . . .  if I had one.  Nav aids fished out of the Erie Canal in prep for ice skating season . . .  are far superior to the hideous (IMHO) air inflated fabric figurines that seem to have taken over lawn ornamentation in my ‘hoods.  The photo below comes thanks to Bob Stopper.

Why have no works of popular culture NOT featured dancing navaids on a snowy barge and herded into lock by a brightly painted tugboat?

Thanks Bob.  And merry Christmas–whatever you need to do to make it merry–to everyone reading this today.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp, who shares this link about the Flying Santa tradition of New England, an effort that cheered the family of a once-dear friend.

The blog will take Tuesday, December 25, off, since tugster wants to leave Tugster Tower–or the sixth boro spire– and NOT wear out the keyboard.

If you want Christmas posts from previous years, check here.

 

 

Some of you likely know where this tug–  Normandy–worked before it arrived in the sixth boro.  I did not.  Nor did I know other unusual features of the boat . . . which some of you also know.

She’s attractive, smartly painted, and compact:  79′ x  27.’

But I didn’t know until now that she was triple screw, nor that before coming to NYC, she’d operated for Vale Coal Ltd. of  Barranquilla.

Other tugs in Colombia can be seen here, here, and here.

All photos by will Van Dorp.

Jack Ronalds took this photo of Ontario (Jeffrey K. McAllister) and Erie (Missy McAllister) in Canso back in August 2016.

John Jedrlinic took this in the sixth boro in December 2008.

I took the photo below a few months earlier in 2008, as the transfer from Normandy to Ross Sea was happening.

Grouper has been featured here many, many times over the years, but you’ve never seen this much of her out of the water;  it’s “draw-down” time on the Erie Canal near lock E-28A.  These photos come from Bob Stopper a few weeks ago.

 

From Bangkok, Ashley Hutto sends along photos of a decidedly pastel Thai tug

with two barges

on a hawser.

Thanks to Jack, Jed, Bob, and Ashley for these photos.

 

Suppose we go back to “random tugs 2,” which was 10 years and two and a half months ago.  What might be the same?  Answer follows.  These photos I took last week.  Alex and Capt. Brian were not around when I did the #2 post.

Craig Eric Reinauer was, but the barge RTC 103 likely was not.

In 2007, Diane B had a different name and was a Kirby machine.  Now she’s a creek-specialist and pushing John Blanche.

Here’s the best photo I got of Millville and 1964, the newest unit most likely to pass through the harbor.

Emerald Coast heads westbound.

Oleander passes Normandy.  Anyone know why Bermuda Islander (I got no photo.) was in town last week?

And Evening Tide is eastbound in the KVK.  So just by chance, if you look at Random Tugs 2, Evening Tide is there as well.

And since we started with a team of escort boats, have a look at these:  (l to r) JRT, Miriam, James D, and Kirby Moran.

All photos taken last week by Will Van Dorp.

A week ago or so I did a post called Sarah D moving light;  in the next two photos she has a scow that appears light.   Earlier this year, I caught her at the Narrows at dawn headed for Queens.

 

Just a little earlier, Jane A. Bouchard heads down bound with B. No. 225, her usual.

Click here for Jane/225 photos from back more than five years ago.

 

Carolina Coast and Pegasus nose up to a barge at American Sugar in Yonkers on a cold morning,

and Normandy hangs out just north of the passenger terminal with some extraordinary buildings.  For a photo from five+ years ago with Pegasus pre-upper wheelhouse, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who celebrates an anniversary today. Any guesses?

 

Sometimes I like to start new categories so that the numbers don’t get so high, boats no longer extant or frequent get a second look, and we realize that time is passing pretty fast.  So all the photos here I took more than seven years ago.  Some have been on the blog before, but not together and not edited exactly as they are now.

Like Norwegian Sea, she used to be a wintertime staple running up the River, easily recognizable by her upper wheelhouse.

Juliet is still around but not very busy under her new name . . . it seems.

This boat, like her namesake, is gone too soon. Pegasus is still around but no longer looks this way.

Zeus was on the Great Lakes after working in the sixth boro, but I’ve lost track of her.

Volunteer, another unmistakable profile, now long time gone from here.

Zachery  . . . still around and still working. High Peace is now registered Vietnamese and goes by Pvt Dolphin.

Just to break the pattern here, here’s a photo I took of Zachery a few days ago.

Take my word for this last photo . . . the distant unit I can’t identify although I’m guessing a Reinauer boat, but the closer vessel is outrageous.  Actually I mean Outrageous.  That’s the name.  Click here (and scroll) for a previous photo of Outrageous, which I believe used to be based in the sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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