You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Meredith C. Reinauer’ tag.

Bobbie Ann departs the sixth boro with some GLDD equipment. 

Little did I know at the time that Bobbie Ann had left the sixth boro a decade ago, then as Vera K.

Ernest Campbell wrestles along a double hull bunker barge. I wonder why the Centerline Logistics lion has not yet been added to her stack.

When tugs like Mary Turecamo assist a deeply laden tanker, the perspective from the upper wheelhouse is so much different than when assisting a ULCV, with their much higher freeboard.

Sometimes the 46′ x 15′ Rae is just the right size.  Recall Rae‘s role in getting Wavertree back into her berth after the big renovation?

One of the newest tugboats in the boro, Cape Canaveral, 105′ x 36′ and generating 5000 hp, has the most evocative name.

She has two siblings, Cape Henry and Cape Lookout.

Again, is it me?  I don’t believe I’ve seen Justine in a long while. She’s also 105′ x 35′ and 4000 hp.  She has an elevating wheelhouse, which you can see here, scroll.

This is crowded:  (l to r) Diane B, Saint Emilion, Meredith C. Reinauer, Lois Ann L.  Moran, and Pathfinder.

 

Escorting from a distance astern, it’s Kimberly.

And finally, a photo from some time back, Vane’s New York, now working on the Great Lakes, Vane’s only freshwater unit . . .  that I know of.

All photos, WVD.

Franklin crossed over the KVK to

assist Haggerty Girls and RTC 107 out of IMTT.

Patrice just finished assisting a box ship, and then turned around to help a government ship out of port.

Ernest Campbell with no lion yet on its stack.

Kings Points eases Double Skin 307 out of IMTT.

Marjorie B. is about to do a power turn and assist that box ship.

Meredith C. is heading offshore with RTC 135.

And let’s end with a throwback to yesterday’s “golden hour,”

Lincoln Sea and a stealthy Sarah D westbound light just after my first coffee hour.  I have more of these recent golden hour photos…

Here’s a better shot of Sarah D beside a stealthy USS Slater in Albany earlier this month.

All photos, WVD, who is now ready for the big 300.  If you want to assist with a photo of a tugboat, especially one never before seen on this blog –or never before seen in its current or previous iteration, send one along.  I’ll take a few days.

 

Capt. Willie Landers last appeared here  several years ago;  she lost a substantial mast to gain an upper wheelhouse.

She came in during my favorite time of day.

She met Atlantic Sail off Stapleton.

Meredith left a barge alongside Orange Victoria and went on to other assignments.

Troy’s pride Sarah D moved a stone scow out past Jamaica Bay, as all her crew who could did work on deck.

 

 

Ava M waited for a ship as a sloop sailed past.

Daisy Mae headed out for Philly with CMT Y NOT 1 and a load

of non-ferrous scrap, maybe.

 

 

Sea Fox headed out to a job and met Bomar Caen coming into Brooklyn.  Bomar Caen was previously CMA CGM Jaguar.

All photos, WVD.

It’s hard to believe that this title has come up 286 times before today, but here they all are.  And yet, I’m starting out with a photo of Ellen McAllister, who herself has appeared here hundreds of times, but never quite like this, heading into the  dawn and about to pass an unidentifiable Vane tugboat.

Ditto Pegasus, passing between a Bouchard tug to the left and some Centerline boats to the right, and below that ONE container on the bridge and the Fedex plane in the sky.

Double Skin 57 and Long Island, previously Peter F. Gellatly,  moves a barge past IMTT, where some Reinauer boats–RTC 103 and Morgan— are taking on product.

Potomac gets an assist from Fort Schuyler.

Ava M. McAllister passes UACC Ibn Al Haitham, where Genesis Victory is lightering and Liz Vinik assisting.

On another morning, Fort Schuyler heads for the Upper Bay, and that looks like Kristin Poling in the distance to the left.

And where Meredith C. Reinauer is lightering Marvin Faith, Bouchard’s Linda Lee, Ellen S., and Evening Breeze look on.

All photos recently by WVD,who had to look up the namesake of the UACC crude carrier.   He turns out to be a Basra-born scientist from a millenium (!!) ago.  That link is worth a read.

 

I’m not disparaging, but my first thought was “just another” Vane tug heading across the bow, until

we passed and I noticed it was Charleston, which I believe is Vane’s newest tug in the sixth boro.

The new “ubiquitous” vessels on the sixth boro waterways move containerized trash.  Pathfinder is one of the tugboats assigned to this duty.   Covanta first got the contract for this business in 2013, and my first knowledge of these barges was here.

Two different generations of McAllister tugboats headed out recently, Capt. Brian A. and

Ellen.   Launched a half century apart and having a difference of almost 3000 hp, they are both working daily assisting ships in the harbor.

Janet D is a mere five years old and works in marine construction, working for the aptly named Construction and Marine Equipment Co.

Franklin Reinauer was built and christened by that name in 1984.

It appears to me here that Linda L. Miller, the truckable tug, is the prime mover, pushing Catherine C. Miller.  Click to enlarge the photo and you’ll see a handsome spread of Manhattan architecture, sans the peaks.

And let’s conclude with Mister Jim, who back in 2016 did not have the gray/red livery.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who missed the return of Atlantic Enterprise this morning, back from the work in Georgia.

Back in the sixth boro . . . it’s a head-on shot of Thomas J. Brown, with multiple icons of the harbor behind her.

Mister T pushes some loaded barges out east beneath the 59th Street Bridge in the photo below,

and tows twice as many empties westbound in the next photo.

Mary Turecamo shifts deck cargo barge New York from Red Hook over toward the other container ports of NYC/NJ, keeping a good number of trucks off the roads and bridges.

Meredith C. Reinauer moves RTC 150 out in the direction of the Sound.

Philadelphia pushes fuel barge Double Skin 503 into the Kills, over to where Ellen McAllister assists Genesis Liberty out of her IMTT berth.

Then Genesis Liberty moves GM 11105 around and outbound.

Robert Burton, usually pushing compacted garbage barges, the other day was doing

rock scow duty.

And rounding out this post, Ava M. McAllister, still in her first half year of working in the sixth boro, heads out to escort in a vessel just in from sea.

All photos recently by Will Van Dorp.

 

This Bob Hill OT/B creation juxtaposes well with the ever-changing skyline of lower Manhattan, as seen from the East River.

Meredith C. is timing her eastbound trip with a fair tide through the Gate.

Catching the same tide, it’s Evening Star.

Farther SW, Gracie M. makes her way around Bergen Point.

Evening Breeze is a Bouchard new build, only recently arrived here.

On this sunny morning, Janet D pushes a Hughes construction barge past

an inbound scrap bulker.

And in closing, notice the soft spring colors of the trees along the KVK as

Dylan Cooper pushes her barge into the Upper Bay.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose energy level is rising along with the outdoor temperatures.

In the continuing project of posting a sampling of the variety of vessels calling in the sixth boro, here’s a variation on the RORO profile.  Click here to see the many previous RORO posts.   Several minutes before I took this photo, I saw it and couldn’t quite understand what I was seeing.

It’s about the location of the bridge, much farther toward the stern than typical.  It might be a more comfortable ride, but view forward is decreased, I imagine.  Maybe this is the immediate future of the design.  

I wish I’d gotten a bow-on shot.  She is not large–460′ loa, but she’s on the run Grey Shark used to do, at least this voyage.

Here she is juxtaposed with Meredith

It is a new profile, built in Japan in 2010.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has a nagging sense of seeing this RORO recently but unable to find any previous photos.  Maybe it was one of those few times I was near the water but sans camera.  It happens.

I don’t know who to attribute this photo to, but it is said to show a laker crossing Lake Superior with a deckled of automobiles, mid-1930s.  I wonder when automobiles were last transported on the Great Lakes in this fashion . . .  Anyone?

 

Name that tugboat?

Or this one?

Or these two?  Answer follows.

Enjoy the rest of these for what they are . . .

Bruce A. McAllister above and Fort McHenry below.

Meredith C. Reinauer on a sunny but

cold morning.   Ready for the answers on the first three?

Well, the first was Kimberly Poling, then

Dace Reinauer, which I first saw looking like this.

And finally Emily Ann, which reminds me of an email I once receivedfrom a reader named R. Pena, who wanted to track down the boat to which he owed his life after his own had sunk between Cuba and Florida.  I embed the link to that post here because it’s a story that bears repetition.

And finally pushing New Hampshire around,

it’s Scott Turecamo.  As a former resident of that state, I thought no one ever pushed New Hampshire around!

All photos this week by Will Van Dorp.

 

Lucy Reinauer, according to Birk’s site–has an interesting history, acquired by one of her owners from lottery winnings.

She came off the ways in 1973, from Jakobson, source of many older boats in the sixth boro.

Franklin is a few years older, built in Louisiana, and formerly called Ocean Tower and Matthew Tibbett‘s, both names now used on other boats.

Meredith C. Reinauer is a 7200 hp behemoth, here pushing

RTC 150.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp

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