You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Jacksonville’ tag.

Nathan G comes toward the Narrows with

a max loaded scow.

B. Franklin Reinauer heads into the Kills

 

Hunting Creek heads west and

Jacksonville, east.  By the way, what is that blue flag halfway up the mast above?

N is for Nicholas Vinik coming by to

to assist Genesis Victory with GM 6506 out of IMTT.

And we’ll hold it up here.

Remember my virtual tour.  It’s 45-50 minutes, no advertisements, and you get to ask questions.

You’ll travel through time and space Tuesday, May 26, and if you can’t listen in then, it’ll be archives so you can listen whenever you feel like.  Book it, please.  It’ll answer every question except . . . where Sal was born.

 

Radar helps when you can’t see in the fog, but

even on a clear day, you can’t see the crew operating this 2013 2000 hp tugboat, or its history . . . how it got to become a fixture in the sixth boro.

Ditto this 1994 tug, operating with 3000 hp.  Here Kimberly Poling is docked, and the outside viewer knows no reason why.

Brian Nicholas was launched under a different name before Nixon was elected.  If only one could be privy to all the conversations and dramas even happened aboard.

Mister Jim was based for 30 years in the Gulf of Mexico, although without looking at her logbooks, who knows where all she worked.

Ellen McAllister has the distinction in this post of having been launched before Nixon was elected also AND worked both sides of the Atlantic, and I would suspect she’s appeared on this blog more times than any other of the machines here, but still . . . even I, what do I know about her quirks and feats?

Helen Laraway, unless I tell you, would you know that she was working before Kennedy was elected POTUS?  And with rehabbing and repowering . . . she’s as good as new, I believe, and working hard for a 63-year-old.

James E. Brown is the youngster of this post, built in a fishing village originally called Coq d’Inde, now anglicized.

Finally, back in the fog . . .  It’s Stephanie Dann, a product of the Carter era.  As to these dates and use of POTUSes as time references, it’s not political, but you’ll see my point here in tomorrow’s post.

And yes, all photos and info here by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Well, maybe your subscription to something has expired, but reading tugster requires no subscription, and no lucre flows into tugster tower from your –I hope–daily habit of checking in here.

It is April first, and I quite like the day. Here was what I did April 1, 2010, and here  . . . .   the day in 2009.  I don’t always mark it, although once I shifted focus of the blog entirely to trucks, the first time.  That generated a bit of hate mail . . . which led to a whole new division of tugster, i.e., trickster. which autocorrect always wants to spell incorrectly.  Truckster it is.

Since you’re here, let me share some miscellaneous photos.  Sea Hunter has recently turned up near the McAllister yard.  I posted my photos of Sea Hunter as she appeared in Boston three years ago here.  Anyone know what fate she’s hunting for in the sixth boro?  Also, on the photo below, there’s the Atlantic Trader barge.  That’s  the short-sea shipping hull I last saw in 2015 here.

Here’s a dense shot:  near to far, the far tugs are Crystal Cutler, Jacksonville, Navigator, and another unidentified Vane tugboat.

So while I’m at it, let me share some mail.

From Phil Gilson, an article about fast US Navy vessels converted into shallow draft speedy banana boats, and that’s no April Fools joke.  See it here.

And finally here’s an oldie-but-goodie from Steve Munoz.   Jane McAllister (1968) and Margaret M McAllister (1928, converted from steam to diesel in 1957)  assist a Sealand ship in Port Elizabeth back in 1986.  Note the Old Bay Draw is still bissecting Newark Bay in that shot.

Thanks to Phil for the story/link and Steve for the photo.

The other photos by Will Van Dorp, and inscribed in tugster tower by invisible watermarks.

 

I missed Josephine Reinauer (actually I saw her but couldn’t get a clear shot)  when she visited town recently, but I did catch Jacksonville, the latest Vane machine in the harbor.

For some reason I expected her to look different, but it’s an Elizabeth Anne class tug, which’ll look a lot like most of the rest of the Vane fleet.

Eric and the other McAllister escort tugs have been quite busy recently.

Ernest Campbell has been here about a half year doing bunkering, I believe.

Trevor usually works as a dredge tender, focusing on the Jersey shore this fall.

Brooklyn was called Brooklyn Service when I first discovered the sixth boro.

Daisy Mae is just over a year old.

Normandy came to the sixth born from Colombia a few years ago.

Rowan has been working in the sixth boro of late.

In fact, almost seven years ago, it was Rowan that brought Patrice McAllister into the boro after the tragic fire during her delivery from the Great Lakes to this salt water.  These days, Patrice is looking great.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has heard about but not yet seen Hunter D.

 

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