You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Evening Mist’ tag.

I suddenly have a full hopper of photos from readers like you.  Thanks.  Let’s start with a photo of these two boats from Tony A taken on October 29.

Yesterday, November 3, I got this photo from Dan Horton showing how things are trending.  My wager is that by now the red on Evening Star is gone and she matches Susan Rose and might be even be carrying Jordan Rose signage.  At first I thought this was a gray, but here it looks like a flat off-white.

Meanwhile, in Belfast, here’s a surprise from William Mitchell

She’s not been renamed but she joins the fleet of this boat.  Know it?

It’s Fournier Tractor, previously McAllister Tractor and Mabel Colle Fournier Tractor appeared in this blog here a few years back.

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Since we’re in Belfast, how about this rudder?  Ever seen one like it, with it’s three-part design?

Here’s the vessel it’s from, Sequoia at French and WebbSequoia made its way up there on a deck barge two years ago, as seen here.  The photo above and below come from Allan Seymour.

Liz Alma has been in the area this past month.  I’ve just missed her a few times, but Tony A got this photo over in the Arthur Kill.  I caught her along the North Carolina coast here a few years back.

And let’s close this out with this lowly supply boat for Alcatraz Island, an LCM-8 built by Higgins in New Orleans in 1954.  George Schneider sends it along as a boat on his list of “seldom cared about vessels.”  He writes that she’s “commercially documented as # 1191433, and was given an appropriate name for her service:  Solitary.”  I’d say some name paint is in order, although maybe supply chain woes have delayed it. A striped livery might work well too, almost a dazzle in this case to call attention to itself.   George goes on about a large tour boat on this coast named Escape. He writes, “You’d think that name has an overtone of Shangri-la, but she was originally purchased for the Alcatraz tourist business until found inappropriate for that run.”  I wonder if only the boat was inappropriate or the name as well.

Many thanks to Tony, Dan, William, Allan, and George for these photos. 

July 2009 she looked like this . . .

June 2016 like this . . .

And in August 2021 . . .  she looks like this.  Welcome Mary Emma.  Congratulations to the new owners, recognizable by the tan/green colors.

And transformation I missed was Evening Mist, who recently got a new logo on her stacks and traveled

to Belfast, Maine.  No doubt more Bouchard boats will be transforming soon.

More paint-overs of this fleet to follow.  Others I missed have been Capt. Fred, now registered in California and Linda Lee, operating for a Texas concern.

And speaking of transformations, the first cruise ship since February 2020 came into port this morning . . .  with more to come.

Excuse the branches and tendrils reaching out over this dense pack of tugboats:  five Bouchard boats plus a Harley behind Denise and a Genesis on the drydock.

Crystal Cutler here in profile is heading for the Kills;  this photo prompts me to wonder how this wheelhouse “window” configuration has worked out.

Stephen B assists Fells Point leaving IMTT with Double Skin 302.

Marie J Turecamo heads east on the KVK.

I can’t recall now whether this is my first time to see Vane’s New York, here with Double Skin 53.

Seeley moves a scow eastbound.

Mount St. Elias goes west here.

And finally . . . J. George Betz heads east, possibly to pick up a barge.

All photos and interpretation by Will Van Dorp, who is solely responsible for content . . .

Quick post today . . .

Bert,

Bridgeport,

Helen

Rhea, Mist, and Tide.  I’m eager to see the new Breeze.

And closing the post out, it’s Ava with raked spuds!

All photos by Will Van dorp, who has irons in the fire today.

 

On this day, the area where the Hudson enters the highlands looked every bit the fjord that it technically is. 

I took these photos and was remembering ones sent by Richard Hudson of southern Chile, here.

It’s Breakneck Ridge on the left and Storm King Mountain on the right, with West Point academy buildings in between. Check out those links for all the other names these places have had in the past 400 years.   And who knows what names have existed before then.

By now some of you have identified the two tugs . . .

Brooklyn and Evening Mist.

I was surprised to learn that Poling-Cutler Marine Transportation now operates Brooklyn.

 

Here Evening Mist moves her barge into the terminal in Newburgh.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

The harbor of NYC . . . the watery parts I call the sixth boro . . . is quite diverse.  Bridgebuilder 22 (2012) I caught in Erie Basin,

where I also saw Miss Aida (2002), formerly known as American Muscle.  Now that’s a name!!

Stephen B has been on the blog before, but this is the first time I had my camera with me as I passed Westchester Creek.

Treasure Coast was at Caddell Dry Dock and Repair earlier this month . . .

as were Evening Mist and Genesis Glory and 

Pearl Coast.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Genesis Vision has just gone onto the wire from alongside, and

tightens it, moving the barge outbound for Florida.  Click here for a 2013 photo of Genesis Vision as Superior Service.

Stephen Reinauer steams out to the Lower Bay to stand by with a barge just

vacated by Timothy L.

McKinley Sea returns in the direction of its barge out in the Upper Bay.

Hunting Creek provides a needed boost as Pokomoke moves Double Skin 39 out of the dock at IMTT.

In the fog, there’s a negotiation going on between Evening Mist and Evening Star that took me a bit to figure out . . . Ah . . .

Star goes into the notch of B. No. 250, and then Mist assists in the 180 degree turn.  Note the pink ribbon on Mist’s stack?

My father would say, “Dean‘s lit up like a Christmas tree.”

Helen Laraway . . . assisting?

 

The truth about Helen is that she was waiting as Anthem was departing.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

This post follows on one I did seven and a half years ago, here.

The first photo--Donna J. with B. No. 272— comes thanks to Jed, whose Caribbean tugs you may recently have seen here.   Donna J. is moved by two EMD R20-710G7C-T3 generating 10,000 hp.  Also notable is her fuel capacity of 301,504 gallons of fuel, which if I used the right formula, converts to 1055 metric tons of diesel.

Here are more recent Bouchard units photos starting with Jane A. with B. No. 225 on the North River,

Evening Star passing IMTT Bayonne,

Boys crossing the southern tip of Newark Bay,

Buster with B. No. 255, 

Ellen with B. No. 280 in the same anchorage same day,

Buster and Evening Mist . . . and how about the one to the left?  Guesses?

It’s Doris Moran last week.

Thanks to Jed for the photo of Donna J;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Let me start here . . . the boat below can be yours.  Click on the photo for full information.  It’s currently in the Seattle area, and I’m posting this for a friend.

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Turecamo Girls –this one was launched in 1965 and is rated at 1950 hp.  Here was a previous version, which may or may not still be working in South America.

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Gulf Venture–She’s a new vessel in this harbor.  Launched in 2016 and “married” to Gulf Carrier, call her powerful at 5150 hp.

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Any guesses?

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Tangier Island, the tug, 2014 and 3000 h.

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Mister Jim, 1982 and 1800 hp.

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This Stephanie Dann, 1978 and 3200.

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Evening Mist, 1976 and 3000.

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Here she’s framed by the bow of Yantian Express.

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Finally, James Turecamo, 1969 and 2000.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who recalls a wonderful tour of parts of the Salish Sea aboard Coot (for sale above) almost seven years ago here.

Here  are the two previous posts by this title, and more.

Juxtaposed boats invite comparison, allow perception of subtle difference, here between Marion and Doris.

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It also gives a sense of the random traffic patterns, here about to pass the impatient Peking are (l to r) Michael Miller, Charles Burton, and way in the distance Robert E. McAllister.

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Here , a few seconds later, Charles Burton‘s barge CVA-601 is about to obscure Chandra B–on a ship assist?– and Miriam Moran.

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Here, from l to r, it’s Sapphire Coast, Charles Burton, Evening Mist, Ellen S. Bouchard, Robert E. McAllister, Scott Turecamo, and Erin McAllister.   cg2

And a quarter hour later and from a different vantage point, it’s Stena Companion, Cielo di Milano, a Miller launch, Maersk Phoenix, and NCS Beijing.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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