You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Sarah D’ tag.

It’s been nearly a decade since I last used this title and alluded to that big encounter . . . leading to the settlement of the Hudson River.

Looking at the photos I took yesterday morning, it did seem like an encounter as well, one of the type unique to summer.  QM2 had just come in when it was too dark to get clear shots.

Sarah D was inbound . . .

and Fishing Creek–her first appearance on this blog I believe–was outbound.

Sarah D was pushing Weeks 108, and

and Fishing Creek had DoubleSkin 53.

 

Encountering the Sarah D tow was this sweet fishing boat,

Mary Sue.

And way out toward the Hook, the USCG was doing their thing  . . .

meeting a foreign-flagged sloop named

Choucas3, named for a bird maybe and

which sported this flag from the Isle of Man.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who was enjoying the calm and cooling breezes of dawn.

 

 

Sarah D makes for Global Terminal,

Helen Laraway passes an inbound container vessel,

Ava M. guides a ULCV in beside a cruise ship,

Rebecca Ann moves a light scrap barge,

Capt. Brian A. tails a box ship into her berth,

Genesis Glory passes GM 11105,

Eric McAllister assists a tanker into its berth,

Rhea I. Bouchard heads westbound light in the KVK,

and Frances pushes a scow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who loves that the sixth boro never sleeps.

And now one more, taken this morning in San Juan PR by Capt. Neftali Padilla, it’s the arrival of the cranes towed by Capt. Latham after not quite an 18-day run. See the tow departing NYC here.  Thx much, Tali.

The blog is called tugster, and not tatter, taster, tagster or truckster, as much fun as those digressions may be, being able to be a bit obsessively focused, this is the 249th installment!   If you add in the non-random tug posts, it’s even more than 249.

W. O. Decker, the only wooden-hulled tug in this post. Built in Long Island City in 1930 and 52′ loa.

Christian Reinauer, built 2001 in Mobile AL and 118′.

Haggerty Girls 2013 built in North Kingston RI and 110′,   and I think,  Dean Reinauer 2013 in North Kingston RI and 112′

.

Ellen McAllister, … 1967 in Sturgeon Bay WI and 102′ and she’s been a staple in the sixth boro for as long as I’ve been paying attention.  A former YTB, she works–it seems– every day.

Paul Andrew, … 1968 in Loreauville LA and 63′.  She too has been working the harbor since I’ve been paying attention. 

Jill Reinauer, … 1967 in Houma LA, and 91′ loa.

And to round things out with a photo I took in September 2017–all others have been since mid-February–it’s Sarah D, built 1975 in Palatka FL [Mary Kay, 1973 in Palatka FL] and 90′.  She has appeared on this blog fairly recently. 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wishes you warmth today.

Now about tats and tasting . . . those might be franchise expansion ideas . . .

As I mentioned before, the other morning brought clear bright light, along with the biting temperatures and wind.

Given windy conditions, assistance was everywhere.

I forgot to check where Lincoln Sea was arriving from, but she was headed for IMTT.  Alongside DBL 140 was Pegasus.

Sharp morning light makes for crisp shadows.

 

 

As Pegasus moves on this part of the assist, Sarah D has completed her task and moves out of the way.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here was the first post of this title.

Yesterday was cold but also windy, and this allowed me to see Sarah D in a role I’ve not posted previously for this boat, although she’s no doubt specialized in the assist role earlier in her career.

Above she approaches the dock on the port side.   The flag direction shows she’s in the lee.  At the hose rack, she drops back and

moves to the starboard side, as Mary Turecamo moves Tennessee into the dock.

 

 

She holds the barge here against the wind and current until all lines are made fast.

This stretch of the KVK was quite busy, so more on the other traffic tomorrow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who loves this cold clear weather, even though he puts lots of chemical heat packs in his pockets and boots on days like this.

A week ago or so I did a post called Sarah D moving light;  in the next two photos she has a scow that appears light.   Earlier this year, I caught her at the Narrows at dawn headed for Queens.

 

Just a little earlier, Jane A. Bouchard heads down bound with B. No. 225, her usual.

Click here for Jane/225 photos from back more than five years ago.

 

Carolina Coast and Pegasus nose up to a barge at American Sugar in Yonkers on a cold morning,

and Normandy hangs out just north of the passenger terminal with some extraordinary buildings.  For a photo from five+ years ago with Pegasus pre-upper wheelhouse, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who celebrates an anniversary today. Any guesses?

 

George sent me these photos months ago, and I apologize for leaving them in storage for so long. But since I have a lull in traveling, these photos need to come out now, starting with Deschenes, about which I’ll have more to say at the end of this post.  This photo was taken in the interestingly named town of De Tour Village, MI, a place definitely on my list for a summer trip.

As I reconstruct George’s journey, which started and ended the same day in Sault Ste Marie MI, he drove close to 500 miles to get these photos.  I’ve rearranged the order.  This fish tug on the Garden Peninsula appears to be called Morning Star, although likely in earlier days it had a different name.  I skipped this peninsula on my trip last summer.

Farther east and south, he shot Siscowet (1946) over the fence.  As of some time ago, the Burger Boat vessel was still not scrapped.

Lake Explorer, built 1963 as a USCG 82′ cutter, is now retired from the Minnesota Sea Grant program. No doubt, the vessel below has shifted some of its work to Lake Guardian, which I caught here entering Milwaukee harbor.

Krystal started life as 45′ ST 2168, later USACE Thunder Bay, launched by Roamer Boat in 1953. Some Roamer STs previously posted on this blog can be located here.

LARCs . . . here’s one.

This tug yacht . . .  George had no clues about.  Anyone?

Linda Jean, built in Green Bay in 1950, spent a quarter century as a fish tug before transformation into a pilot boat, a role she continues–I believe–to serve. I’ve long been intrigued by fish tugs.    In the distance, that’s Drummond Islander IV, 148′ x 43′ with 32-car capacity, since 2000 providing year-round service to  . . . Drummond Island.  Click here for the great shots of her “walking” over the ice on a -15 degrees F morning.  How can drones even work in that?

If there were plans to scuttle this Chicago River icebreaker fireboat as a dive site over a decade ago, well, only skydivers could descend on her in her location as of some months back.  It’s Fireboat Engine No. 37 aka Joseph Medill, launched in 1949 and retired in 1936 1986.

My reason for starting out with George’s photo of Deschenes is that she is for sale.  Here’s a photo of the boat in 2003.

Here she is out of the water at Passage Boat Works in De Tour, MI, and

and here’s the paperwork.  If interested, here’s more:  asking price is $22,000.00 and contact is Les Thornton at les.d.thornton@gmail.com

Thanks to George and Les for use of these photos.

And happy thanksgiving, today and every day.

Unrelated:  Enjoy this slide show of the work leading up to the opening on the VZ Bridge 53 years ago today, and below, that’s Sarah D outbound under the VZ near midsummer earlier this year at 0530  . . .

Sarah D passes the Con Hook range markers while leaving the Kills the other day.

Subjective only, I find Sarah D, ex-Helen D. Coppedge–a very attractive boat.

I was pleased to get these photos with Newark NJ and

the occupants of Bayonne Dry dock in the background.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated to Sarah D, here’s a story of the connection between Con Hook and the Rockefellers.

It’s been a while since I used this title.  I went there yesterday morning to have a long walk but beat the impending heat.  Besides, a setting moon over Staten Island beckoned, and I had to be up early anyhow to milk the cows . . ..

Well, that was a kink in the time continuum.  But Eric McAllister had work,

as did Sarah D . . .

and Fidelio had arrived from who-knows-where over the horizon, a string of US ports but the voyage beginning in Lázaro Cárdenas, Mexico.

 

 

 

For Sarah D, once she’s past High Power, likely she’ll go to Inwood and then upriver.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Really random means just that . . . so that’s start with this one, Tutahaco, YTM-524, which has recently been hauled out of the water  between Daytona and St Augustine.   Michael Schmidt took these photos back last winter.

She worked for a time in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

The next two photos come from Allan and Sally Seymour, whose twotugstravelin’ blog was mentioned in yesterday’s post.  Kathleen Turecamo (1968) is a staple these days in the Port of Albany.

A bit farther north on the Hudson in Troy is the footprint of NYS Marine Highway Transportation Company.  Pictured here from r to l are Margot, Benjamin Elliot, and Betty D; built in 1958, 1960, and 1980, respectively.

The next photo is from Kyle Stubbs, who writes “the original JOVI is still around. The simple answer is yes, and she’s quite a ways from the Sixth Boro, now taking up residence in San Diego in the service of Pacific Tugboat Service as the JAG. I’ve attached an image of her I took this past September.”  Kyle sent the photo along in response to a question about Lil Rip I’d posted here some years back.

George Schneider picks up the Lil Rip‘s origins question here and sends along his own photo of Jag, to wit ”

I was very suspicious of the story she was made from part of a Liberty Ship, since hacking up something like that just to make a push boat didn’t make sense.  But somewhere along the lines, I realized the LIL RIP was registered at 54 feet long.  I found a Liberty Ship was 57 feet wide, so that’s perfect, considering they had to cut away some of the “stern” for the propellers, so the registered length would be a few feet shorter than overall.

That gave me a reason to believe the reputed origins of the boat were true.  It makes even more sense, because if you realize the scrap yards generally had no drydocks or slipways, they’d cut a ship like that down to the tank tops while it was afloat, then somehow had to dispose of the double bottoms.  Sometimes they just took them out and sank them since it took so much extra effort to clean and cut them up.  But in New Jersey, whose coastline is inland, they probably had to cut them apart and lift them ashore, and voile!  What a perfect hull to build a pushboat on!

So I’m wondering if anybody has added more to the comments on that day’s page.  If anybody has ever seen her “on the hard,” they might have measured her across the deck, and if that measures a perfect 57 feet in length, I’d say that’s pretty close to proof.  I looked up the liberty ships sold for scrap 1961-64, and none were scrapped in Elizabeth NJ, nor were any scrapped by her owner.

But several deceptive things are at play here:  1)  A ship sold for scrap was not legally reused for anything, so the title to something made out of the pieces couldn’t reflect the original vessel.   2)  If the ship wasn’t sold for scrap, was “Sold for Non-Transportation Use’ which was also sometimes authorized, she might not have been included in the list of vessels scrapped, and 3)  Vessels were often bought by distant companies, then found the vessel couldn’t practically be towed to their scrapyard, were sold or contracted to other companies for scrapping.

As for the question of the original JOVI (283905), she kept her name long after the JOVI II, working for various East Coast companies, but then made her way out here to San Diego, where she now works.  She has worked as TUG JAG, then KODAK, and now simply JAG.  I’ve attached, unfortunately, the best and only digital photo I’ve taken of her.  You can reproduce this any way you’d like.”

Now I’m wondering about Logan and Mate.  Logan shows in the NOAA registry as built in 1974 and formerly called Kodak, Jag, and Guppy.   Mate doesn’t show.

Sarah D (1975) worked for White Stack, Turecamo, and Moran (each bought out the previous company) before coming to NYS Marine Highway.

And finally, once again out and about in the sixth boro, it’s W. O. Decker, the 1930 wood-hulled tugboat of South Street Seaport Museum.

Click here for some of the dozens of posts I’ve included Decker in.

The last three photos are by Will Van Dorp;  thanks to Michael, Allan, Sally,  Kyle, and George for the other photos.

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