You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘L. W. Caddell’ tag.

Let’s start with the photo I did NOT get, but jag9889 did;  click here to see Resolve Commander and (in the photo stream) the barge it towed Thursday carrying the remaining TZ Bridge structure out to sea.   Bravo jag . . . . I’ve long enjoyed your work.

The photo below raises some questions . . .  not because of Mary Gellatly, which has long been there, but because of the MSRC Responder vessel beyond it and tied up at the Sandy Hook Pilots’ dock.   Something’s happening here. . . .  I don’t believe it’s the local New Jersey Responder.

Stephen Reinauer headed out the Narrows, and shortly thereafter,

Dace came in, offering a comparison of the outline of the two boats.  Stephen dates from 1970, 3000 hp, and 100.2 loa;  Dace, 1968, 3400, and 108.8.

Below we can do a different comparison:  Dylan Cooper, 2015, 4720 hp, and 112.2;  Lincoln Sea, 2000, 8000 hp, and 118.6.

 

L. W. Caddell is the yard tug at the repair yard.

Emily Ann, 1964, 3000 hp, and 89.4.  My favorite story about this boat formerly called Cabo Rojo (among other names) can be found here.

Emily Ann crossed paths with Caitlin Ann, 1961, 2400 hp, and 78.9, here moving a light scrap scow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

By June, I’ve heard, Peking will be in Germany, and after watching the barque in the sixth boro for over a decade, I’d have to go abroad to see her next transformations.  Glenn Raymo, whose beat generally keeps him up river, happened to be having lunch in Bayonne yesterday and caught her move from her berth of the past has year to the one she occupied late last summer.

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Many thanks to Glenn for permitting me to post these here, as not all of you do FB or off you do, are friends with Glenn.   Foxy 3 and Robert IV do the honors with

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the mighty L. W. Caddell on the far side.   Note the salt pile and bulker Sakizaya Wisdom out beyond Peking.

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Many thanks to Glenn for his serendipitous and striking photos.

 

 

November, port month on tugster, ends here, making this GHP&W 30.  Here’s how the month began.  One thing I learned putting together this post is that Port Richmond and Mariner’s Harbor appear not to share a border, at least according to the wikipedia map.  Between the western edge of Port Richmond and the eastern edge of Mariner’s (the west side of the Bayonne Bridge) is a neighborhood called Elm Park.  I’d never heard of it.  Also, look at the northeast tip of Port Richmond . . . it’s in the water only and includes the Caddell yard.  Furthermore, Port Richmond never seems like much of a port if you see it by road only.  Click here for photos of the land portion of Port Richmond.  Click on the map to make it interactive.

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A google satellite view shows the northernmost margin of land is port-intensive.  Click here for many vintage photos of Port Richmond, pre-Bayonne Bridge, back when Port Richmond was a major ferry/rail link.

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Although the late fall midday sun backlit these shots, let’s cruise the waterside of Port Richmond, starting at its northeastern point, where the Wavertree (1885) project is ongoing.

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Delaware River & Bay Authority’s Delaware is undergoing some major repowering work. 

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Frying Pan . . . light of the night vessel from up at Pier 66 is having some work done.

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In the belly of Frying Pan, where the engine and machinery used to be, a night club sometimes comes to life.    Click here for some renderings of the vessel by the elusive bowsprite.

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Miss Liberty, built 1954, is nearly finished with this dry-docking.  Notice here she is high and dry?  Well, just 45 minutes later, she had been

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splashed and was being towed to a wharf by Caddell’s own L. W. Caddell (1990).

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Continuing to the west, it’s the yards of Reinauer and Moran. From l to r, here, it seems to be Meredith C. Reinauer (2003), Laurie Ann Reinauer (2009), Reinauer Twins (2011), and Dace Reinauer (1968 but JUST repowered). . . and Joan Turecamo with (?) Brendan Turecamo.  The McAllister tug between the Reinauer ATBs . . . I’ll guess is Bruce A. Marjorie B. McAllister.

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This photo, taken a half hour earlier and before Joan Turecamo (1980) tied up, shows Kimberly Turecamo (1980), the very new and beamy  J. R. T. Moran (2015), and Brendan (1975).

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On the west side of the Moran yard, it’s Cable Queen (1952).  Click here for photos of this cable-layer at work through the years.

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And for the last shot of Port Richmond–although this may be straying westward into Elm Park waters, it’s Metropolitan Marine Transportation’s newest Normandy.

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All the photos today by Will Van Dorp.

So as I said at the beginning of this post, so ends the “gunk holes, harbors, ports, and wharves” series.  However, precedent on this blog makes it really easy to do a Port Richmond 2, 3, 4 . . . . etc. post.  also, if any of you feel like contributing a set of photos from a port of gunk hole, no matter how large or obscure, I welcome it.  Besides, there’s always then possibility of doing an “upland” version of any port, focusing on land-based businesses serving the work vessels.

And as for December, let me reprint this idea for a December theme:

How about  antique/classic workboats, functioning or wrecked.  Of course, a definition for that category is impossible.  For example, NewYorkBoater says this:  ‘The definition of an antique boat according to Antique and Classic Boating Society is a boat built between 1919 and 1942.  A classic was built between 1943 and 1975 and the term contemporary, are boats built from 1976 and on.’  Hmm . . . what do you call an old vessel built before 1919 . . . a restoration project?  antediluvian?

If you take another transportation sector–automobiles, you get another definition:  25 years old or more.    And for the great race, here were the rules for this year:  “Vehicle entries must have been manufactured in 1972 or before.”  Next year’s cut-off will likely be 1973.

So my flexible definition is  . . . photo should have been taken in 1999 or before, by you or of you or a family member, and in the case of a wreck, probably identifiable.  Exception . . .  it could be a boat built before  . . . say  . . . 1965.”

Many thanks to all of you who sent along photos, contributed ideas, and commented in November.

Enter right . . .

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… it’s L. W. Caddell, which I believe was built at the yard a quarter century ago.

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A shipyard needs a small tug (loa 46′ x 16′) for lots of projects . . .

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with every job.

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And L. W.  . . .

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has an even smaller fleet mate, Jay Bee V, 1969

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and loa 38′ x 12.’

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I got there JUST in time.  A few minutes after I arrived, lines were cast off, and the yard tug moved the bow into the stream.  What’s to comment . . . I’ll just put the times, to the nearest minute.

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Here the yard tug–L W Caddell is moving lines from the dry dock to Wavertree.

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And then it was lunch time.

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Here you see the dry dock “ballasting”  . . . or sinking.

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Note the “wet” portion of the dry dock as it rises, or “deballasts.”

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Note the size of the workers relative to the hull.

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The next step is pressure washing the communities that traveled on the hull from the East River to the KVK.

Here Wavertree will stay through the winter as she goes through a thorough and exciting transformation.  Become a member and send your own “bravo” to all the folks at South Street Seaport for all the strides in the right direction.  See here and here.

Tomorrow I hit the road for New England for a while. I will try to post, but my laptop has become quite uncooperative.

First, notice the Tugboat Roundup logo upper left?  Click on it for the schedule;  I’ll be giving an illustrated talk “1500 Miles on the Erie Canal”  Saturday and Sunday.

Also, if you are in Boston this Sunday, Maine Sail Freight will be at Long Wharf in Boston with pallets of products from farm and sea.  Click here for a link to other sail freight initiatives around the world.  Here’s more on that project;  a change is that schooner Adventure rather than Harvey Gamage will be transporting.

Seeing the Moran boats on the upper left side of this foto reminds me that I owe you an answer to Relief Crew 9‘s question, which herinafter, shall be dubbed the “tugsterteaser,” term coined by Jed.  Tugster teases maybe but always delivers.  Answer comes thanks to Harold Tartell:

“The year of that photo would be early 1962.  The M. MORAN (brand new but  doesn’t look it) has returned to New York from Pusan, Korea after towing a floating generating plant for the U.S. Navy.  She left her builders (Gulfport Shipbuilding in Texas) in Oct. 1961 and made the tow from there directly to Pusan.  The MARIE S. MORAN built in 1961 (now TERESA McALLISTER) and sister MARGARET MORAN (now BRIAN A. McALLISTER) were both built in 1961 by Dravo Corp., Wilmington Del.  They were on charter to Moran with an option to buy.  McAllister took them over with the same agreement later that year, and ended up buying them.  They were the first two tugs in McAllister’s fleet single screw with Kort Nozzles.”  Thanks Jed and Harold!

So back to more posteriors.  After reading the bottom paragraph of this post, decide whether to some the expression should be “negatively posterior”?

L. W. Caddell is a 1990 built 16′ breadth tug working around the Caddell yard.

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Christian Reinauer, 2001, 40′ breadth.

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Pati R Moran, 2007, 36′

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Zachery Reinauer and Thomas J. Brown, 1971 and 28′ and  1962 . . . 19′.

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Rosemary McAllister, 2008, 36′.

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And while we’re looking at sterns, here’s an unexpected detail on Peacemaker, a boathouse behind the fold-down stern.  Bowsprite sends along this foto.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp, except the last one.

And some discoveries lead me to reiterate my creative commons licensing.  Fair is fair.  More on this later.  But please comment on this:  what should I do if unauthorized use of my work turns up?  What would you do?

In the foto below, Odin is the smaller of two tugs. Groton, the green ITB catamaran tug with stern facing us, dwarfs it. Yes, that’s tug. If you missed my earlier posts, type ITB in the search window and you’ll find lots of fotos in three posts. According to USCG documentation, Groton is 127 loa, 90 beam, and 39 draft… make that “hull depth.”

Gulf Dawn, ex-Francis J built in 1966, hails from the Big Easy.

L. W. Caddell, loa 46, was outside the yard some time back.

Vera K, ex-Goose Creek built in 1967, had me thinking she was her much younger and previously-blogged-about sibling, June K.

This was my first glimpse of Robbins Reef, ex-Glenda D and Gerald S, loa 42 and built in 1953.

Unrelated: Thanks to my friend Peter Mello for calling my attention to a photographer named Shuli Hallak. Peter does a great blog called Sea Fever and a podcast called Messing Around in Ships, with John Konrad of gCaptain.

Photos, WVD.

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