You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Charles D. McAllister’ tag.

From the east  . . .   and

from the west . . .

launched in 2010 and carrying up to 8500 teu, and

to the left, launched in 2011 and  . .   4520 teu…

they meet near midpoint in the Kill van Kull.

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They seem much closer than they are.

Charles D. is exactly where she needs to be.

 

Another sail completed from his perspective, the docking pilot returns to the tugboat.

All photos, WVD.

 . . .and barges, of course.  Someone or something has to pay the bills.  This unique bow is the leading edge of RTC 135, 460′ x 72.5′ here building up a lot  of water,

getting moved along

by Nicole Leigh Reinauer.  They both date from 1999.

Crystal Cutler, always a joy to see,

moves a light Patricia E. PolingCrystal is approaching her 10-year mark. 

A surprise tug

moving this past week was Evening Breeze.

although she was light. I first posted photos of this 2019 boat a year and a half ago

McAllister tugs seem to rotate bases.  I hadn’t seen Charles D. for a while, but she’s back.

and working hard.  She dates from 1967, when she was launched as Esso Garden State, part of a large Esso shipping fleet.

Helen Laraway (1957) has been working in a harbor a lot these days. 

Seeley (1981) with a Weeks barge and Frances (1957) heading for fuel were westbound here.

All photos, WVD.

Clifford Maersk is making her final approach into port of NYNJ, arriving here from King Abdul Aziz Seaport in Damman, KSA.   So what?  Check out the non-containerized cargo near the front center of the load.

See it?

As the container ship approached, I managed to get some closer up photos.    I have my theory, but I’ll leave it to you to state yours in the comments

 

Do you see the “squiggle” on the camouflage just right of the red panel, above the rightmost blue container marked “45”?  I call that shape “ithnayn,” Arabic for the number two.

Again, I’m not putting into words what I see here, but I will say it’s poorly wrapped, or formerly wrapped.

This isn’t the first time I’ve seen intriguing cargoes.  Remember these Oshkosh trucks with Hebrew writing on them?  And then there have been other military hardware . . .  military trucks and other vehicles atop the boxes previously here, here, here, and here.   Once I even spotted a cigarette boat way up there.

All photos, WVD.  After your guesses, I’ll show my hand.   And since I’m not trick or treating or dancing tonight, here’s your second post for today.

As you know from some earlier posts, those red morning skies . .  they mark my favorite times.

Here Coral Coast with Cement Transporter 5300 has just departed the dock with Ruby M‘s assistance.

 

Soon afterward, Sapphire Coast arrived with Cement Transporter 1801, and assisted

by Stephen Dann.

Later in the morning, Sarah Ann pushes scow Michelle D.

Durham moves deck barge Arlene, bound for some work in the East River.

Harry McNeal returns with barge 1962 to IMTT to continue the job there.

Nicole Leigh stands by with RTC 135.

Pathfinder delivers empty garbage containers from the railhead to the marine transfer station.

Charles D. returns from Earle.

And finally, departing IMTT,

Genesis Victory gets an assist from Normandy.

All photos, WVD.

Going through a backlog from “before” in late winter 2020  . . . a boat approached I didn’t recognize the profile of . . .

William Brewster . . . 65′ x 22′ and built by Blount in 1983.  And in spite of the livery, it seems she’s a fleetmate of Helen Parker and Ava Jude.

How’s this for unusual color?  Recognize the boat?  To see her in previous incarnations, click here and scroll.

Earlier in 2020 I caught Helen Laraway, and

on my way to somewhere else in the archives, I stumbled onto this photo, taken from the window of Amtrak in 2016.  I guess this was north of Hudson somewhere.

Charles D. comes and goes.  Recently I caught her solo doing an assist.

One of the true staples of my time in the sixth boro has been Ellen McAllister, but what I’d forgotten I noticed in this photo from a few years ago . . .  also tripped over while in the dark archives . . .

see the two circular plates on the afterdeck . . . my guess is that’s where the Z-drives were installed.

All photos  . . . WVD, who will be exiting the archives soon, I hope, after we win world war c.

 

Here was the first in this series.  Let’s go to a different location on the East River, and I know I’m late coming to this story, but it’s an exciting one.  Hunts Point is now receiving regular cement shipments, by ship via the East River.  Shipments originate at Port Daniel Gascons, QC.

Here under the 59th Street Bridge a cement ship heads for the terminal  . . ..

 

Above and below, the ship and tugs pass the soon-to-open new campus of Rockefeller University.

I took the next two photos at a McInnis facility just upstream from Montreal, along the Beauharnois Canal.

Here’s more on the company.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

As of this writing, another cement ship is at the terminal.

 

It might as well be spring already.  Well, maybe my wish is that spring were here.  I heard a spurious claim on a TV I visited the other day that March 20 is the planetary beginning of spring in the north but March 1 is the meteorological start of spring.  But it must be true since I heard it on TV!??

But pairs, not Paris.  Capt. Brian and Charles D. . . .  interesting pair showing evolution of design 50 over the half century between the launch of each.

Fells Point landed Doubleskin 302 with Stephen B doing assist.  That’s the first I seen Stephen B in the assist role.

Miss Julia could be Dylan Cooper‘s workboat.

CF Campbell heads east passing Scott Turecamo/New Hampshire and then

makes for the Upper Bay, where JRT is assisting Orange Blossom 2, herself a bloom in the dawn light.   The photo above and the one below I took less than a minute apart, yet you’d think the light was saying hours separated the two.

Kimberly passes Eric.

Marie J Turecamo and Mister Jim run side by side under the Bayonne Bridge.  Does anyone know when the pedestrian walkway on the bridge will open?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

This is the time of year when boxes are moving every which way on land.  Delivery drivers for companies like FedEx and UPS work even longer hours on dark streets, especially here in the north.  Click here for a graph of global container ship capacity in seaborne trade since 1980.  How many containers exist worldwide?  Answer follows.

Box ships move containers around the world all year round.  Astrid Schulte departed the sixth boro a week ago and has moved through a handful of US ports since then, approaching Savannah now.  Assisting her around the bend at Bergen Point are (r to l) Ellen McAllister, Marjorie B. McAllister, and Charles D. McAllister.

 

I haven’t found the resource with info on air draft, so I don’t know if this vessel (ex-APL Illinois) would have fit beneath the old roadbed.

 

 

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  And the answer to the question in paragraph one is . . . . there is no answer.  See more here.

Here are dozens of previous posts in this series.

I put this one up today specifically in response to a comment by a dear friend Rembert, who commented here about the apparent high center of gravity on American tugboats.  Mein Schiff 6, which is 969′ x 139′, appears to be quite “tall” but largely because of its verticality.

TUI operates Mein Schiff 7.  I’m guessing the “Leinen los”  here translates to the Dutch lekko [itself an approximation of the English],  the English “cast off.”

Here, from a different angle, is TUI’s logo projected overtop USNS Gilliland.

Steel–a great name–has similar vertical sides,

as does Orange Star, a transporter of my favorite beverage.

Ditto Denak Voyager.

For tugster, here’s an unusual shot of Avra, at the dock at night.

Let’s conclude with Navigator of the Seas, 1021′ x 127,’ so appearances aside, N o t S is actually less beamy than Mein Schiff 6.  Note the Chrysler Building in the photo below?

All photos by Will Van Dorp,who’s been unable to find air draft, particularly on Mein Schiff 6 and  Navigator of the Seas.  Anyone help?

And if you fans of the NYTimes missed Annie Correal’s story about shipping vehicles to Haiti out of Red Hook aboard Beauforce (replacement for Grey Shark?), click here to read it.

 

or “marifly.”  These two tankers have called here for some years now, but I always wondered whether they were one and the same, given that their names refer to the same critter.  Maybe other vessels in the fleet have names like Paruparo and Borboleta.  Anchored over in Bay Ridge was Mariposa, while doing short-time in Bayonne

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was Butterfly.

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After finishing up business in Bayonne, Butterfly flitted off

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with Robert E. McAllister lined up port side

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while Charles D. McAllister took care of her port.

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Think they have caterpillars on board?

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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