You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Helen Laraway’ tag.

Radar helps when you can’t see in the fog, but

even on a clear day, you can’t see the crew operating this 2013 2000 hp tugboat, or its history . . . how it got to become a fixture in the sixth boro.

Ditto this 1994 tug, operating with 3000 hp.  Here Kimberly Poling is docked, and the outside viewer knows no reason why.

Brian Nicholas was launched under a different name before Nixon was elected.  If only one could be privy to all the conversations and dramas even happened aboard.

Mister Jim was based for 30 years in the Gulf of Mexico, although without looking at her logbooks, who knows where all she worked.

Ellen McAllister has the distinction in this post of having been launched before Nixon was elected also AND worked both sides of the Atlantic, and I would suspect she’s appeared on this blog more times than any other of the machines here, but still . . . even I, what do I know about her quirks and feats?

Helen Laraway, unless I tell you, would you know that she was working before Kennedy was elected POTUS?  And with rehabbing and repowering . . . she’s as good as new, I believe, and working hard for a 63-year-old.

James E. Brown is the youngster of this post, built in a fishing village originally called Coq d’Inde, now anglicized.

Finally, back in the fog . . .  It’s Stephanie Dann, a product of the Carter era.  As to these dates and use of POTUSes as time references, it’s not political, but you’ll see my point here in tomorrow’s post.

And yes, all photos and info here by Will Van Dorp.

 

J. George Betz and Morton Bouchard Jr. raft up on the floating dock.

Helen Laraway pushes toward the east.

JRT passes Weddell Sea on the way home after completion of another job.

Daisy Mae moves a deeply loaded scow westbound.  I’m not certain but believe the product is road salt.

Discovery Coast heads over toward the Kills.

A light Elk River makes for the next job.

Emily Ann tows  astern passing the collection of boxes in the Global Terminal.

And Majorie B. passes Pacific Sky while she steams back to the McAllister yard.

And one more, Ellen S, Pearl Coast, and Evening Light .  .  round out this installment.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose sense of this decade’s end is growing more palpable, offers this photo of Michigan Service and a whole lotta dredgin’ from the last two weeks of 2009.

I’m always on the look out for new tugboats in the harbor, and Camie mostly fits that bill.  A bit of research, though, finds she’s been on the blog a few times already, however.

Here, l to r, it’s Polar Bright, Ava, New York, and Stephen B.

Robert Burton here is tending a rock scow in front of the very busy Bayonne background.

James Brown moves some scrap barges . . . likely in the direction of the East River.

Weddell Sea stands by with Penn No. 90, demonstrating all the components of “push gear.”

Maybe someone can clarify here, but it appears No. 90 has cargo heating gear.

 

Helen Laraway moves a scow toward a morning.

And Fort Schuyler heads straight for us–I’m zoomed in–away from a marine/industrial Brooklyn background.

For the last day of November 2019, all photos by Will Van Dorp.

And finally, click here for Paul Strubeck’s Vintage Diesel Design blog post on tugboat Luna in Boston.  It expands a post I did on Luna here almost four years ago.

 

Frances heads out to earn some money on a rainy yesterday morning.  I’ve no idea what that red glow behind the Statue is.

Lincoln Sea has worked on both coasts since I’ve been doing this blog, and like Frances, has kept the same name.  Click here to see her in my second ever blog post . . . 2006.

Michael Miller here moves equipment to and from islands in the boro’s archipelago.  I first saw this vessel as Stapleton Service.

Annie G II goes way back on this blog too.  Recently she’s been doing a job over west of the Staten Island Ferry racks, a job she was the perfect size for.   She’s a WGI tug.

Jane A. Bouchard was out along the east side of Staten Island, passing the old US Marine Hospital.  See it here if you scroll way through.

Ellen McAllister was heading out for a call.  I likely first posted a photo of her here.

In that photo earlier, Jane was headed to meet up with Evening Star and her barge.

James E. Brown and Thomas J. Brown tag teamed car float NYNJR 200, the newest and largest car float in the sixth boro.

Ditto, CMT Pike and Helen Laraway meet up on a set of scows.

And to close this out, it’s Austin Reinauer, Boston-bound in the rain.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are the previous three installments of this title.  After seven straight weeks away, I’m back in the boro for a while, a short while, and it seems the best way to catch up–attempt to–is to work backwards, starting from now.

A welcome sight on the west side of midtown . . . . Chandra B, ensconced here in the marine guard.  A great name for an organization?

Nearby, Miss Circle Line stands at the ready.

Still earlier this morning, I caught St. Andrews, 

and before that Frances.  More of her as I work backwards in time.

Earliest of all today . . .  Helen Laraway.

 

One from our arrival yesterday . . .  it’s Thunder Bay, an icebreaker assigned to summertime and UN Week duties.  As the name of a Lake Superior port, this name goes with lakers as well.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who feels a bit like Rip Van Winkle this morning.   Maybe I should gallivant a bit in the sixth boro . . .

 

Sarah D makes for Global Terminal,

Helen Laraway passes an inbound container vessel,

Ava M. guides a ULCV in beside a cruise ship,

Rebecca Ann moves a light scrap barge,

Capt. Brian A. tails a box ship into her berth,

Genesis Glory passes GM 11105,

Eric McAllister assists a tanker into its berth,

Rhea I. Bouchard heads westbound light in the KVK,

and Frances pushes a scow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who loves that the sixth boro never sleeps.

And now one more, taken this morning in San Juan PR by Capt. Neftali Padilla, it’s the arrival of the cranes towed by Capt. Latham after not quite an 18-day run. See the tow departing NYC here.  Thx much, Tali.

Years ago when Odin departed the sixth boro, someone said there’d likely never be another tug here of that sort.  Well, there is.  Every time I see either CMT Otter or Pike, I recall the unique Odin.

In CMT colors, Otter looks quite sharp.

Also in these sharp colors, it’s Daisy Mae westbound in the KVK a few days ago, pushing CMT Y NOT 2 with a good 8000 tons of southern Jersey sand.

I have an article about the sand run that will be published later this year.

Eastbound at the same point on another day is Mister Jim pushing

a barge deeply laden with aggregates.

And still fresh from a rehab, it’s Helen Laraway, ISO

a barge to load up with aggregates as well.   Here was probably the first photo of Helen Laraway on this blog.

CMT . . . the company had no tugs, actually was no company, just a half decade ago.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Quick post today . . .

Bert,

Bridgeport,

Helen

Rhea, Mist, and Tide.  I’m eager to see the new Breeze.

And closing the post out, it’s Ava with raked spuds!

All photos by Will Van dorp, who has irons in the fire today.

 

 i.e., CB.  I’m writing this on the 8th . . .  my first encounter with serious wifi. After today, I might not have wifi again for a spell.   Last year I posted about this trip under the title GWA.  Two years ago it was Go West.

Let me post some highlights from August 1 and 2, and Chelsea Piers to the Rondout.  Note the fireboat 343 below,

Left Coast Lifter at Spuyten Duyvil,

 

USAVs Chickahominy and Missionary Ridge across from West Point,

Helen Laraway pushing a handful of barges southbound toward the Highlands,

 

Our vessel down the hill from

Newburgh’s historic district,

Penobscot Bay heading down river,

Philadelphia upbound,

Hudson leaving the Rondout for the Hudson,

and Johannsen Girls doing the same.

All photos by Will Van Dorp on August 1 and 2.

When Helen Laraway first appeared on this blog three years ago, I stated, accurately, that she was likely the only tug based in Coeymans NY.  How that has changed!!  Now there are more than half a dozen, and they stay busy with some high profile jobs like beer tanks and steam generators.

Enjoy some photos of taken of Helen in different locations recently.  Click here for my post Helen Laraway,  the boat as viewed by the stag on Bear Mountain.

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is off on another gallivant.

 

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