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Quick photo tribute to the variety of the sixth boro . . . with Kirby and Jonathan C. heading for an assist,

Diane B moving petroleum product to the creek terminals,

James E. pushing a mini scow,

Durham moving a scow named Wheezer,

Curtis returning fro the base to her barge,

Gregg assisting Lady Malou, now heading from the sixth boro to Panama,

B. Franklin returning to her barge,

another shot of Durham pushing Wheezer,

and here, finally my first close-up view of this Osprey.

All photos, last week, WVD, who found this story of a bizarre deal involving the Canadian CG buying a light icebreaker from Turkmenistan!!?

 

Tugboats move quite the variety of materials around the boro on barges.  The brand spanking new J. Arnold Witte here moves Delaware Bay, a bucket dredge. 

Doris Moran moves containers around the boro much quicker than trucks can.

I had to throw this in  . . . a late 1950s Chevy pickup was moving a motorcycle southbound on the BQE. 

Sea Fox transported a scow with its own clamshell (I think) in the upper bay.

Helen Laraway had some rich light on her as

she came west in the East River, passing Lower Manhattan, with

some cubed metal.

The seldom seen Liberty II was bringing maintenance equipment to the Statue island, when I noticed an interesting detail.  See the blue Thrustmaster engine covers?

A closer up of that part of Liberty II shows she’s twin engine and her starboard engine is not in use. 

 

Closing it out, Durham is moving a mini scow into the Kills.

All photos, WVD.

Random Tugs 001” I posted in October 2007, 14 years ago.  The motivation for such a post then, as now, comes from the observation that what passes you by, either on the water, the roadway, or even the sidewalk or hallway, is often just random.  It’s foolish to look for meaning or significance where there is none. So here’s installment 339.

Genesis Glory, 1979, 3900 and 120′ x 34′

Janet D, 2015, 1320, and 67′ x 26′

Sarah D, 1975, 2000, and 90′ x 29′

HMS Justice, 2013, 2000, and 75′ x 30′

Sarah Ann, 2003, 2700, and 78′ x 26′

Charles D. McAllister, 1967, 1800, and 94′ x 29′

Durham . . . I’ve seen her a long time, I believe she’s operated by Ken’s Marine, but I don’t know anything more.

Kodi with Hayward back by the bridge.  Kodi dates back to 1974, under 500, and 43′ x 15′, I think.

L. M. Caddell works near the floating dry docks. The upper wheelhouses at the Reinauer yard in the background, I’d guess Dace, Stephen, and JoAnne III.  I’m sure I’ll be corrected.  I don’t believe the shorter “upper house” to the right is installed on a tugboat.  Now I’m really sure I’ll be corrected.  As for simple specs on the Caddell yard tug . . . sorry.

Coho, 2008, 4000, and 111′ x 36′

All photos, WVD, and happy “fly the official flag day.

So in a recent post, you had a glimpse of this small craft, which I initially thought was a fishing boat.   I know how addictive fishing can be, since I used to ice fish and canoe fish.

But it turned out to be Lynn, a Ken‘s boat, used for line and boom handling. I’d not before noticed that some of these small boats have names.

Another boom and line handling company, ACV Enviro, also has names on their boat.  Meet Miss Urvi, an interesting name in several ways.

Here’s Miss Urvi showing my bow on a foggy day.

An intriguing small craft departed the Narrows yesterday.  Where is it headed I wonder.  It looked to be no more than 35′ and the name might be Sirius.

I’m not sure who operates Grace D, but she’s been in the harbor for the better part of a decade doing launch service.

 

Head on . . . who is this survey boat?  Notice the up fold-down transponder on the bow between the hulls.

It’s USACE.  I believe it’s a Silver Ship boat.

At first, I didn’t know what I was looking at when I saw six knees.  Sure, Gabby I knew and I saw a small boat to starboard,

but

there were two alongside, one on each side.  And on the far side, it’s Mister “B”...   a new one for me.

So it is.  All photos, WVD.

Larry J. Hebert has been in the boro a few months, following a GLDD dredging project. She’s from 1981 and rated at 3600 hp.

She headed eastbound in the KVK here with a fair amount of wire out, it seems to me.

Helen Laraway, light, heads west.  She’s the oldster here, 1957, and 2000 hp.

Bergen Point, 1958 and 600 hp,  heads east

and ducks behind an Evergreen ship.

Kristy Ann, the youngster in this batch, launched in 2018, and 4560 hp, left her barge in the anchorage and came in . . . to check in a the yard on Richmond Terrace.

James William, 2007 and 2800 hp,  brings two light scows out of the Kills.

and gave the photographer, I believe, a friendly whistle.

Virginia passes by, the first time in an age that I’ve seen her.  She’s from 1979 and generates 1400 hp.

And Genesis Vision makes an impressive turn in front of Caddells.  She’s a 1981 boat with 3000 hp of push.

All photos, WVD, who is solely responsible for any errors.

 

I realize the oxymoronic twist of this title . . . local v. exotic . . . but these are boats that are seldom seen.  When this stack and upper superstructure first cameinto view, i suspected it might be one of those ghost AIS signals like Hunter D or No. 11 Asomaru I’ve been noticing of late.

But no, no yeti or sasquatch yet.  It’s Cabana dba Art Boat.  Does anyone know where/when Cabana was built?

And a few days later . . . this . . . , which at this angle I first thought a faux Mississippi style steamboat, down by the bow, as some Centerline boats in the distance looked on.

No, those were not stacks, but spuds rather.

And then it gradually came clear . . . Honorable William Wall, aka “willie wall,” Manhattan Yacht Club’s floating bar, usually anchored between Ellis Island and NJCRR station.

The occasionally-seen Durham is the prime mover here, with the clubhouse on the nose,

making way for the summer lounging area.

That’s it for today.  All photos, WVD, who advises for avoiding crowds these days and making your way to the solitude at the land’s edge, training your eyes to the waters where you might just see more local exotics.

 

 

Last year I called it the same but without a date.  See here . .    here . . .  and here for all the rest.

We’ll start and end with Dylan Cooper.  Is anyone shocked by this tow tube behind the small boat?

Mary Alice returns with a dredge spoils scow.

Bear?

Durham and rebar?

Remnants of the TZ Bridge. . .

and “chewing” hard on other remnants.

Stony Point Light . . .

Tug Kristin Poling heads for Jones Point, and

Dylan Cooper moves toward the tanks in Newburgh.

All photos on Monday by Will Van Dorp, and this was Manhattan to Newburgh.

Here are previous iterations of this title.

Well, in fresh water like the Upper Saint Lawrence, they look like this, from a photo by Jake Van Reenen.

In salt water, even small outboard work year round.  There are boom boats,

patrol boats,

more boom boats,

clam-digging boats,

small island supply boats,

fishing boats,

police boats,

. . . and 29′ Defiant boats.

Top photo credit to Jake;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

. . . a sixth boro set on a day that was predicted to bring rain.  When I first saw the photo below, I thought the McAllister tug was assisting a DonJon unit?

A few seconds later it was clear that Alex was overtaking the slower Paul Andrew.

 

Dr. Milton Waner–named for a plastic surgeon!!— here travels light.  Harley does have this focus on medicine in their recent namings, like Fight ALS and One Cure.  That’s Durham in the distance with the spud barge.

 

Around the same time, Eric McAllister, Thomas D. Witte, and James E. Brown appear, headed for the Kills.

 

Mr Russell comes out of the Kills.  And can you name the Vane tug in the distance?

Philadelphia!

It must be the newest Vane tug in the sixth boro, and I don’t know if she’s even more recent than Capt. Brian A. McAllister. For all I know, this could be her first week in town….  And from a full decade ago, here’s the previous Philadelphia in town, the ITB Philly.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

First, thanks to Peter Eagleton, Philip T Feeney in the 1970s.  I haven’t the heart to go see her in her current condition.

Next, Miss Ila, resplendent as a springtime cardinal!

Haggerty Girls nudging RTC 107 out of the Kills,

 

Helen Laraway passing TS Kennedy over by ConHook,

James William leaving Mister Jim over by the scows,

James E. Brown taking some rail cars past a wall of containers . . .

and finally . . . is that Durham setting up Willy Wall?  Is that what it’s still called?

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, except that first one supplied by Peter, whom I thank.

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