You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘USACE Hayward’ tag.

T . . . teamwork.  Not the same idea as teams, which suggests competition.  Teamwork . . . only unites all those people invested in the same project, whether they get along or not.  Like maintaining buoys marking the channel, benefitting people on the water as well as those on land.

aaat3

Like USACE Hayward responding to reports of hull-puncturing, wheel-destroying debris afloat in the channels.

aaat1

Like Capt Log getting fuel where it’s needed and when.

aaat2

Like Baltic Sea and its entire crew–invisible here–reporting to the next job, as

aaat5

is true of Comet, its dispatchers, and harbor traffic controllers.

aaat6

Ditto Huki, if that’s the canoe’s name.  I love the outrigger.

aaaat

As well as Spartan Service

aaat7

And Morton S. Bouchard IV and Kristin Poling and every other

aaat8

boat and ship that negotiates passage on 1 or 2.  Like Marjorie B McAllister and Cape Cod.

aaat4

And Meredith C. Reinauer and all the boat crew as well as shore crew, professional and personal.

aaat9

And Delaware Bay . . . it can dredge away sand and silt to keep the channel clean ONLY because of its talented and dedicated crew and the efforts of hydrographers who determined what invisible amounts of earth was extraneous.

aaatx

So who works alone?  Nobody that I know, not even those who sit in their workspace alone like the crane operator solo in the control cabin hundreds of feet above the hoi polloi;  even that solitaire draws a paycheck and follows orders or gives them.  And we belong to all kinds of non-competitive teams simultaneously:  ones that pay for our daily food, drink, and shelter.  Ones that keep us safe in so many contexts.  Ones that make us smile and chase away our blahs and blues.  Ones that intrigue us and keep us curious.  Ones that back us up when we feel vulnerable.  Ones that trim us when we get too brazen or sure.  Even the ones we don’t get along with;  Hudson danced  teamwork steps with Juet, even while lowering Henry, young John Hudson, and eight stalwarts overboard to their deaths on the cold waters of Hudson Bay. I could go on, but you get my point.  I’m reminded of the point.  Teamwork . . . sounds trite . . . but isn’t.

All fotos . . . Will Van Dorp.

M . . . mast.  I love the wikipedia disambiguation pages, where a range of contexts for words like mast or masthead defies expectation.

Cornell sports its mast toward the stern; running lights there convey information about vessel size, type, and activity.

aaaam

Clearwater, a sloop, has a one mast topping out at about 110 feet.

aaam6

On City of Water Day, USACE Drift Collection vessel Hayward sports code flags on its mast and a sampling of collected debris on its foredeck.

aaam2

Pioneer, a schooner, has two masts, the mainmast topped out at just under 77 feet.

aaam1

Sandy Hook Pilots vessel Yankee has units (besides the radar and GPS) on its mast I can’t identify.

aaam3

Bunkering tanker Capt Log‘s foremast carries a red flag, signaling fuel.

aaam4

So does barge DBL 76.  Mast height on Adriatic Sea is 85 feet, if airdraft equals height of the highest mast or antenna.  I fear I might be blurring a definition here.

aaam5
Volunteer, air draft of 114 feet and pushing DBL 105, meets Turecamo Boys assisting Seven Express out to to sea.

aaam7

USCG WPB67356 Sailfish, not surprisingly, carries mast gear not readily identified by a civilian like me.

aaam8

Miriam Moran, assisting with docking, keeps the upper portion of its mast safely lowered where flaring bows cannot damage it.

aaam9

Masts can signal information but of course sometimes signaling is optional or even undesired.  Masts allow things to be seen, but one has to know what should remain unseen.  An effective mast needs strength, and sometimes that means it is flexible.

Both submarines and whaling ships have masts.  For some good fun, check out this six-minute video of  a struggle between Captain Ahab and Moby Das Boot.

Also, just for fun:  How might you complete this sentence:

aaaaaxm

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Send me your original sentence completions.

Hmm . . . a 38′ ZFXO?

with all that speed cruising for mermaids?

Corps of Engineers vessel Hudson has nice lines, but I’m unable to locate much info about about its history or mission.

Cormorant is the DEP skimmer vessel, fishing for floatables. See p. 19 of this great overview of the City’s wastewater process.

It might be irreverent to say this, but COE’s Hayward seemed to use the flag as jib in order to turn on its axis. Tell me I saw that wrong.

Photos, WVD.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,366 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

May 2020
M T W T F S S
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031