You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Mississippi’ tag.

GL tug Mississippi has appeared on this blog several times before.  She’s a tiller-steered boat that looks good and still works hard although built in 1916!!

GL tug Ohio was built in 1903!! and originally served as a Chicago Milwaukee fireboat. 

She’s recently changed roles again, as a result of her joining up with that green-hulled laker behind her.  Recognize it?

Now she’ll live on more decades, centuries we hope.

Of course, the green hull is the Colonel, Col. James M. Schoonmaker. If you’re in Toledo area, check them out.

Many thanks to Paul for use of these photos, and reminding me, I have a bunch of Schoonmaker photos I’ve never posted.  Maybe I’ll do that tomorrow.

Edda Fram runs back and forth, it seems, from shore (Scotland)  to various oil platforms in the North Sea.  Rough weather operation necessitates seats hard to fall out of.

Solomon T, once operated by Elbert Felton (shown), is a 1938 restored inside the Outer Banks fishing vessel, with seat and wheel appropriate to 1938.

MV Argyle is a ferry that operates on the Firth of Clyde.

T-ATF 172 USNS Apache has a spacious bridge.

Tug Mississippi, in service doing commercial work since 1916 (102 years!!) has a “bar stool” and a tiller.  It was repowered from steam to diesel electric in 1957.

Converted Bering Sea crabber Ocearch has wide bridge.  Here’s an article I did on their shark research program a year and a half ago.  Follow individuals of different species of shark around  the ocean in real time here.

A seat on an ATB? here’s the spacious wheelhouse of Paul T Moran.

Lake Express is a fast ferry that crosses Lake Michigan several times a day from Milwaukee to Muskegon.  One of these days, I’ll cross the lake fast.

Here’s another fast ferry, Athena,  sometimes serving Block Island.

Kaori is a 2004 tug operating in New Caledonia.

I’ll close out this post with the seat of power in the powerful Ocean Taiga.  For an article I wrote on this St. Lawrence tug, click here.

To protect the anonymity of some folks who sent along these photos, let me just give a tip of the hat to all the photographers.  Unless you send along more photos or unless I take some more, this’ll be the last in this series.  Any seats out there in strange colors?

Click here for previous posts in this series.  I add these now in response to a reader who says  . . .”but we have ship assist and harbor tugs in the Great Lakes as well.”  And the most iconic of those are the GL tugs, an old fleet that has been not only maintained but also updated.

Here are ones I’ve photographed this month.  Vermont dates from 1914 and Washington from 1925, and they are still on the duty roster.

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These first two photos were taken in Buffalo, said to once have been the 3rd busiest port in the world.

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In the port of Cleveland, much remediated from when the river burned most conspicuously,

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Iowa, dating from 1915, towed Sea Eagle II up river.

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Nebraska, 1929, was coming through a very busy railroad bridge here on the Maumee in Toledo.

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Mississippi dates from 1916.

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Idaho, 1931 and  the last of this series to be built, was behind this fence in Detroit on the Rouge River.

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In previous years, I’ve posted many times about a GL tug stranded in the Erie Canal.

Not all the GL tugs have this profile.  For example there are some converted YTBs like Erie and Huron.  And recently, tugs that were previously only in saltwater have made their ways to the Inland Seas.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

This is a repost of the 4th photo in the post from two days ago, showing General Humphreys.

bt5CORPS OF ENGINEERS 85ft INSPECTION BOAT GENERAL HUMPHREYS 3- 19- 1928

I repost because Dan Owen responded as follows:   “General Humphreys was rebuilt into a conventional tug in 1950, 76 x 18.2 x 6.6, reportedly had two GM 6-71 diesels, 330 hp., which would have made it away under-powered. Data is very sketchy but I have a photo taken at Levingston Shipbuilding Co., Orange, Tex., which is undated but may be where it was rebuilt. I am sending this photo as it is the only one I have showing the SARAH R. II as an operating tug. This is a contact photo made from an original negative and is starting to turn yellow with age, hence the fading, but if the photo was made in 1950 at the time of rebuilding.

fb1Sarah R II (Boat Photo Museum)

Louisiana Marine Repair and Service Co., Inc., Baton Rouge, owned it in 1950.  They sold it in March 1966 to John C. Jackson, Jr., dba River & Canal Enterprises, Inc., Baton Rouge.
In Nov. 1976, still owned by Jackson, but removed from documentation as dismantled.  For many years the SARAH R. II was lying along the bank of the Port Allen-Morgan City Route of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway at Plaquemine, La. It may still be there.   I am also attaching two photos of the SARAH R II in this derelict condition.”   Anyone know what remains at that location?
fb2Sarah R II #2 (Boat Photo Museum)

 

fb3Sarah R II #3 (Boat Photo Museum)

Many thanks to Dan Owens for his quick follow up and permission to post these photos.  Hats off to all of you out there working today, like Taft Beach.

tb

 

 

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