You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘HMS Justice’ tag.

This follows up a post from not quite two weeks ago here. Of course, this unidentified recreational craft–here with HMS Justice and Fort McHenry–is out for a morning to commune with the fish migrating through the boro.  More on fish soon.

I have to admit first off that I missed SV Vaquita sailing through, but you can catch the highlights and follow along on YouTube, produced by the same wit as TimBatSea, both of which are YT channels worth checking out. Vaquita made its way south of Norfolk through the Dismal Swamp canal. 

Ketch Manana from Nova Scotia was eyeing the KVK before heading out the VZ.

Asteria is a 52-year-old yacht.  Registered in Bikini, she actually has the stuff to get there.  I love the lines.

In recent days, I’ve seen her both in North Cove and out by the

the statue, here sending her tender out on a mission.

As this sloop came between Roosevelt Island and the UES, she caught my attention because

of the lines and the polished aluminum hull. 

It turns out she’s Pleione, an Alubat Cigale 16 that’s been around although registry is Boston.

Finch seemed to be worked by a solo sailor from Portsmouth NH that was handling sail only just outside the ferry routes.

And if these lines don’t catch your attention, nothing will.  Of course, it’s a Lord Nelson Victory Tug (LNVT) 37′ version.  You’ve seen the model before here . . .  as in Sally W.

As it turns out, Sally W is hull #42, and the boat on the East River three days ago is hull #48, aka

Edward S. Marvin, another New Hampshire boat, here quite diminished by the cliffs and bridges along Manhattan’s east side.

All photos, any errors, WVD, a contrarian who’s migrating north a bit next week.  

Random Tugs 001” I posted in October 2007, 14 years ago.  The motivation for such a post then, as now, comes from the observation that what passes you by, either on the water, the roadway, or even the sidewalk or hallway, is often just random.  It’s foolish to look for meaning or significance where there is none. So here’s installment 339.

Genesis Glory, 1979, 3900 and 120′ x 34′

Janet D, 2015, 1320, and 67′ x 26′

Sarah D, 1975, 2000, and 90′ x 29′

HMS Justice, 2013, 2000, and 75′ x 30′

Sarah Ann, 2003, 2700, and 78′ x 26′

Charles D. McAllister, 1967, 1800, and 94′ x 29′

Durham . . . I’ve seen her a long time, I believe she’s operated by Ken’s Marine, but I don’t know anything more.

Kodi with Hayward back by the bridge.  Kodi dates back to 1974, under 500, and 43′ x 15′, I think.

L. M. Caddell works near the floating dry docks. The upper wheelhouses at the Reinauer yard in the background, I’d guess Dace, Stephen, and JoAnne III.  I’m sure I’ll be corrected.  I don’t believe the shorter “upper house” to the right is installed on a tugboat.  Now I’m really sure I’ll be corrected.  As for simple specs on the Caddell yard tug . . . sorry.

Coho, 2008, 4000, and 111′ x 36′

All photos, WVD, and happy “fly the official flag day.

Because the name and focus of this blog is tugster, you’d expect to see a lot of tugboats, both within the confines of New York harbor, aka the REAL sixth boro, and I hope you are satisfied that you find a plethora of tugboats in installments of this blog.  So here’s Random Tugs #337, post 4877, and the tugboat is Foxy 3 moving an aggregate scow.

In the foreground, it’s Crystal Cutler;  off in the distance it’s Normandy.

Diane B here heads east with a cargo in John Blanche.  I did an article on this unit some years back.

Joyce D. Brown pushes an empty scow east.  Notice anything on the scow that identifies it?  See the end of this post.

James E. Brown passed sister Joyce D. that morning in the Kills.

Franklin Reinauer that morning may or may not have been under control of the author of a tugboat captain who shared his tales a few years back.  I will stay mum. Off to the left, that’s Capt. Brian A. McAllister.

HMS Liberty muscled a barge full of bunkers to deliver to a thirsty ship over in New Jersey.

Centerline operates both Liberty above and HMS Justice below.

Susan Miller moves some material and equipment over to the project just west of the St. George ferry terminal.

Brendan Turecamo heads over to the next and the next and the next job.

Bruce A. McAllister assists a container ship into port.

Bergen Point came off the ways at Blount Shipbuilding way back in 1958.

So that scow Joyce was pushing above is called Maria and

this logo says it was once in the Disch fleet, now sold off in many directions.

All photos, WVD.

I’m fortunate to live within easy distance of all this activity:  Nathan G, Treasure Coast, B. Franklin Reinauer, an ULCV, Doris Moran, and who knows how much is obscured behind these . . .  And then there’s the crane atop the building to the left and the gull lower right.

Or here . . . Margaret Moran and a tanker off her stern.

Or here, HMS Justice and Mary H  . . . .

Philadelphia outbound with her barge and Ava M. McAllister inbound with an ULCV.

Mister Jim crosses in front of the slower moving Captain D with a Covanta barge.  Note the cranes at Caddells, with the diagonal lines off the left from  Left Coast Lifter.

Jonathan C Moran, Doris Moran, and Kimberly Turecamo . . . follow a ULCV and 

and here head east for the next job.

Tugboats cross.

 

All photos, WVD.

Long Island, eastbound, gets overtaken by a small fishing boat.

B. Franklin, light, heads to the Reinauer yard.

Doris Moran, light, heads east.

Ellen McAllister assists a Maersk ship through the channels to her berth.

Helen Laraway heads east to pick up a scow.

HMS Justice pushes HMS 2605 through the KVK.

Charles A. and Matthew Tibbetts follow a ship so that they can assist as needed when called upon.

Ava and Kimberly head out to different assignments.

Brendan Turecamo provides port assist.

Mister Jim follows Seeley.

Gulf Coast has been a Dann Marine vessel since it was launched way back in 1982.

All photos, WVD.

It’s the season.

I wonder if the Kimberly crew has marked other holidays and I missed it.  I did catch the red-clad guy almost a year ago.

Mary H and her barge Patriot is likely headed for Newtown Creek.  The 1981 build, such a clean looking tug, has been working in the sixth boro for 33 years.

We’ve had a spate of foggy days.  Beyond Franklin here, notice the bright lights at Bayonne Shipyard where work proceeds on Mendonca even at night.

The mechanical dredge J. P. Boisseau here gets moved to a new worksite by Sarah Ann, with Brian Nicholas standing by.

A Maersk ship came in recently with a gaggle of assist boats:  l to r, Ava, Ellen, and Matthew. Not visible is Charles D. McAllister, and the visible Thomas J. Brown is not assisting.Yes, Matthew Tibbetts is doing a fair amount of ship assist work these days, and why not. 

Here are two more photos of Matthew Tibbetts doing ship assist.

Helen Laraway passed through with a load of scrap.

Poling & Cutler’s Crystal and Evelyn pass in opposite directions.

HMS Justice has eluded my eyes for quite a while, but here she is, with the Centerline Logistics feline on the superstructure.

All photos, WVD.

More low verbal density from a weak wifi signal . . .  in my social media distanced outpost.  But I do wonder about the story here:  Liz Vinik with a barge of small response boats beside Barry Silverton with Fight ALS.

HMS Justice has the orange centerline, but still a name with hMS . . .

Brooklyn pushes DBL 27.

Lucy Reinauer pushes RTC 61.

Stephen B, here looking like Ste, heads for the next job.

And finally, Cape Henry appears to be preparing to tied up to her barge.

All photos, WVD, who encourages all actions aimed at staying healthy.  I accidentally shook hands with some this morning.

 

Radar helps when you can’t see in the fog, but

even on a clear day, you can’t see the crew operating this 2013 2000 hp tugboat, or its history . . . how it got to become a fixture in the sixth boro.

Ditto this 1994 tug, operating with 3000 hp.  Here Kimberly Poling is docked, and the outside viewer knows no reason why.

Brian Nicholas was launched under a different name before Nixon was elected.  If only one could be privy to all the conversations and dramas even happened aboard.

Mister Jim was based for 30 years in the Gulf of Mexico, although without looking at her logbooks, who knows where all she worked.

Ellen McAllister has the distinction in this post of having been launched before Nixon was elected also AND worked both sides of the Atlantic, and I would suspect she’s appeared on this blog more times than any other of the machines here, but still . . . even I, what do I know about her quirks and feats?

Helen Laraway, unless I tell you, would you know that she was working before Kennedy was elected POTUS?  And with rehabbing and repowering . . . she’s as good as new, I believe, and working hard for a 63-year-old.

James E. Brown is the youngster of this post, built in a fishing village originally called Coq d’Inde, now anglicized.

Finally, back in the fog . . .  It’s Stephanie Dann, a product of the Carter era.  As to these dates and use of POTUSes as time references, it’s not political, but you’ll see my point here in tomorrow’s post.

And yes, all photos and info here by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s a calendar’s worth of harbor tugboat shots, starting with Sarah D., looking brand new although built in 1975, her colors matching the shades of Manhattan building materials in the background.

Brian Nicholas (1966) moves into the Upper Bay, her blue repeated in the sky and water and more.

Buchanan 12 (1972) heads down bound and then

back upbound, day after day and year after year.  It’d be interesting to quantify the tons of aggregates she’s moved out of Hudson Valley quarries.

A Blount-Barker product from 2002, Brooklyn moves from Brooklyn over to Bayonne.

HMS Justice is one of the newer boats in this post, launched in 2012.

Kristy Ann is the newest boat in this post, having arrived here last year to replace the nameplate of a boat from 1962.

James E. Brown,  here assisted by Janet D, both 2015 products of Rodriguez Shipyard, brings a daily load of rail cars across the harbor.

Ruth M.Reinauer (2008) heads back to her barge.

The 1979 CMT Pike  . . . I can’t not think of Odin when I see her.

JRT Moran (2015) rounds the KV buoy with Kristy Ann in the distance.

We started with Sarah D and we’ll end with her.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

New in town but probably only in as a transient . . .

It’s Michael L. Daigle, fleet mate of some Hebert boats that have also passed through the sixth boro and likely working on a dredging project in the region.  Note the white horizontal supports above the wheelhouse door on either side.  I’m guessing they’re for quick egress lines   . .  as seen here if you scroll through the 2010 post to Gulf Dawn.

Unrelated . . .  two Vane units approach the Narrows;  the forward unit below has already evolved from wire towing to alongside towing.

As a heavy squall approached, Potomac enters port allowed by

Patuxent, still with the wire out.

A few years back, HMS Justice was a regular in NYC.  These days not so much, but she called here recently.

Fleet mate HMS Liberty follows along behind.

CMT Otter heads outbound, likely towards Queens and Inwood.

And let’s end today’s post with another transient . . .  Captain Sam, here meeting Capt. Brian.  Captain Sam is a triple screw Rodriguez Shipyard boat from 2002.

All photos taken within the general confines of the sixth boro by Will Van Dorp.

 

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