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Let’s start here as a quiz.  Name that tug?  Answer follows.  The blurriness is a clue to the vintage . . . of the photo.  More oldies at the end of this post.

Here’s an unusual treatment of name boards.  Can anyone clarify why the 6140 hp J. George Betz is the only Bouchard boat wit this treatment?

 

I suspected it was Betz when I noticed her here, but had to look more closely to verify.  I believe this is the first time for me to label–if not see–the B. No. 235 barge.

Gulf Venture . . .I’ve not often seen this 5150 hp boat light.  Question:  Does Gulf Venture currently work for John Stone?

Ernest Campbell departs MOTBY here, her mast perfectly shown against the Putin monument . . .  he did come here for the dedication.

Gabby L. Miller .  . she’s not been on the blog in a while.   This 660 hp tug gives the right push at the right time in the right place sometimes.

The 2000 hp Eric R. Thornton dates from 1960, making her the oldest tug in this post except

More oldies.  This is Marion, although I have no information on where and when it was built.  Marion was one of two tugs operated by Disston and June Marine Construction, previously called Burcroft Marine Construction Company. Their other tug was Constructor. Marion sank in Weedsport, although I can’t find that date.

This tug may still be afloat.

It’s Morania No. 8 pushing Morania No. 170 barge.  Has anyone seen her in Port-au-Prince Haiti?  I wonder if this was a company slogan or something displayed more widely.  I’ve never heard it.

The mystery tug, believe it or not, is Buffalo, somewhere in the Erie Canal.  Click here for a few good photos of Buffalo taken by Tim Hetrick back in 2014.   Maybe someone can put a date of the photo by taking into account the color.

All photos except Buffalo by Will Van Dorp.   All the oldies here are by Steve Wunder.

 

Wrangell, Alaska is almost 7000 sea miles from New York.

Harley does have a number of fleets, but the Olympic fleet

seems to have arrived in the sixth boro this month.   Ernest Campbell (1969) is one of several tugs that have retained the last name of the previous owner.

C. F. Campbell (1975) is another.

The other day they cooperated to get Long Island into a dock at IMTT.

Has this 60,000 bbl barge been sold out of Moran’s fleet?  If so, when did that happen?

 

Then last week I caught the 2012 Lighning in the boro,

a 2000-hp tug of the Gulf fleet.

 

The 1999 andrea (3000 hp) has been here for almost three years, if my recall is correct.

 

They’re all Harleys, along with Dr. Milton Waner, St. AndrewsHMS Liberty, and more.   And thanks to Kyle Stubbs, here and here are a set of Harleys from the Pacific Northwest.  And here’s one more . . . from San Francisco.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are previous posts in this series.

There is some self-disclosure here:  since last winter and thanks to my movie-buff son, I’ve gotten hooked on movies based on comics.  So, recently, to my surprise, while watching Gotham, I saw Marie J. Turecamo and one of the 6000s in a CGI-noir of an East River scene.  She’s unmistakeable.  Season 1, episode 11 has all these, along with some FDNY vessels, a NYCDEP tanker, and recognizable barges.

And with apologies to the actor, that is one of the Harley boats, St. Andrews (my guess) or Liberty.

And this . . . ABC-1, with a very odd mast.

I realize some of these are not tugs, but categories are made to be challenged.  In the next two photos, I’d heard that Lilac was used for a Daredevil scene, so I watched the series–not liking it at first–until I got to the scene.  By the time I got there, I was a fan.

Clearly filmed in the Navy yard, I have to say I’m impressed by the magic of cinema, and that’s why it’s the economic powerhouse it is.

All “screen-grabs” by Will Van Dorp.

Somewhat related:  Come celebrate the launch of film maker Thomas Halaczinsky‘s “Archipelago New York”: June 18th, 6PM at Rizzoli Bookstore at 1133 Broadway Manhattan.

Naming the setting is easy, but can you name this tug?  I thought it was Emerald Coast with a modified paint job.

It’s a newbie in town from the Harley Gulf fleet, appropriately named Lightning, given that sky. .

Iron Salvor I’d seen before, but at the dock.  The other day she loaded some fuel at the IMTT pump.  Her intriguing history was commented on here from two months ago.

I don’t believe I’ve seen Kodi before.

She comes from across Raritan Bay, from Belford.

Let’s mix things up with a photo from about 10 years ago . . . Swift, a 1958 tug out of New Haven.

I’ve never seen Miss Circle Line away from the dock, but getting this photo on a stroll along the Hudson the other day led me to discover (maybe again) that she’s a 1955 product of Matton’s shipyard, although she doesn’t appear on this shipyard list, unless my eyes fail me or the list is incomplete.

To go over to Europe, from Jed . . . it’s Union 5. 

photo date 15 JUNE 2017

And a rare shot from Jed, it’s Japanese tug Azusa.  Since then, she’s been sold to Indian concerns and operates as Ocean Marvel out of the port of Krishnapatnam.  Scroll down on that link to see a drawing of elephants being loaded . . . likely more than a half century ago.

photo date 16 Jan 2008

And in closing, here’s Decker and Matilda, photo I took on May 26, 2008.  Where does the time go?

Thanks to Jed for use of his photos, many more of which are in the hopper.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

By the numbers today, Daisy Mae,  launched in late 2017 and generating 3200 hp.

Joyce D. Brown, built 2002 and 2600 hp.

Matthew Tibbetts, 1969 and 2000.

James E. Brown, 2015 and 1000.

Dean Reinauer, 2013 and 4260.

Andrea, 1999 and 3000.

Elizabeth McAllister, 1967 and 4000.

Ellen McAllister, also 1967 and 4000.

Kimberley Turecamo, 1980 and 3000.

Joan Turecamo, 1980 and 4300.

Joan Moran, 1975 and 4300.

Miss Ila, 1962 and 2400.

All photos by Will Van Dorp; all numbers from tugboat information.

 

Overcast warm winter days . . . they’re not give relief but also present interesting light.

Two tugs and the large barge approached, and truth be told, when I first saw the scene above I thought I might be looking at Millville pushing 1964.  Alas no.

I love this portal created in this light . . . although some New Jersey fumes lingered in that same atmosphere.

 

No, that’s not a s*…h*… slur on all of New Jersey; I’m just talking about the atmosphere, the air quality that morning in those meteorological conditions down by that area of the Kills.

I’ve remarked before how I’m impressed by the family tribute in the naming of this barge.  I’ve had two colleagues die of this disease, and it is truly cruel.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes the fight is successful and soon.

Kudos to Ginger, who guessed what the anniversary alluded to yesterday was.  Today begins year 12 of this blog.  So in the midst of all the references to CYBER- this and that, I’ll be my default contrarian self and call the next series a CYPHER series, lots of posts beginning with the number 12.  In today’s I took a photo from the top “hit” month in each year since 2006.

So in 2006, December was the top month, and the photo below (or one like it)  appeared in KVK.

In 2007, September was the top month, and this was from Historic Tug.

In 2008, June, and this was from Transitioning.

September in 2009 and from Divers 2. 

In 2010, November, and this is from Pilot and the Princesa.

June 2011, and context is Like Groundhog Day 3. 

2012, May, and Blueing Beyond the Sixth Boro. 

2013, March, and Looking for a Ship.

2014, March, and Botruc Plum Isle. 

March again in 2015, and this has context in Highway 4. 

March yet again, 2016, and Backing Down Heina. 

And finally, the greatest number of hits in 2017 was in July, likely because of the posts related to Peking‘s move. 

A reason to glance backward periodically is to see what has changed.  The corollary then is that a reason to do a daily waterblog is to record what was present when. And doing that permits me to see changes in myself and my tools.   Blogging, as you might guess, takes a fair amount of my time and guides a bulk of my focus, but it rewards me enough to continue.  I can’t say for how long, nor do I have to.  I’ve always refused to sign my boss’s multimillion dollar contract, although that might cost me the cover story on some high-profile magazine . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And let’s hear some applause for Ginger.

 

. . . a sixth boro set on a day that was predicted to bring rain.  When I first saw the photo below, I thought the McAllister tug was assisting a DonJon unit?

A few seconds later it was clear that Alex was overtaking the slower Paul Andrew.

 

Dr. Milton Waner–named for a plastic surgeon!!— here travels light.  Harley does have this focus on medicine in their recent namings, like Fight ALS and One Cure.  That’s Durham in the distance with the spud barge.

 

Around the same time, Eric McAllister, Thomas D. Witte, and James E. Brown appear, headed for the Kills.

 

Mr Russell comes out of the Kills.  And can you name the Vane tug in the distance?

Philadelphia!

It must be the newest Vane tug in the sixth boro, and I don’t know if she’s even more recent than Capt. Brian A. McAllister. For all I know, this could be her first week in town….  And from a full decade ago, here’s the previous Philadelphia in town, the ITB Philly.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I’m not shifting the focus of this blog to photography–although it’s always been photo driven–but it’s fun to shoot what the light allows, which in this case somewhat obscures the identification of the tug in the foreground and highlights in profile the construction over by the Goethals Bridge.  Also, I’ve not forgotten a realization of a few weeks back about there being nothing random;  context here is recent sixth boro.

Anyhow, name that tug?

Meanwhile, north of the GW, it’s Joan Moran (1975) with a coal barge, from what I could tell.

Farther downriver, it’s Atlantic Coast (2007) with a dredge scow.

On that same dredge project, Shannon Dann (1971) stands by with GL 602.

Wye River (2008) waits over by the Palisades,

Sea Wolf (1982) holds steady over by –is that?–Edgewater.

Barry Silverton counts down for an appointment with Fight ALS,

Brendan Turecamo (1975) hangs with Connecticut, and

that brings us back to the first photo, now benefitting from a different light and easily identifiable as

Doris Moran (1982).

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

First, thanks to Joseph Chomicz . . . it’s Rebel and Dolphin over by the Philadelphia Navy Yard   . . .

Quo vadis, Rebel?

And the second batch comes from Ingrid Staats with likely the most unusual backstory ever on this blog . . .  Ingrid took the photos from a room in New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where her healthy baby was born. She writes, “We had an amazing view of the East River and for four days as Mom & babe recuperated. I amused myself by capturing as many tugs as possible.”    Congratulations to all and here they are:

Sea Lion above moving recyclables and and Evelyn Cutler pushing petroleum product.

TJ and Catherine Miller . . . and is TJ really doing all the work here?

And finally . . . Navigator light and Gulf Enterprise pushing a petroleum barge westbound.

Many thanks to Joseph and Ingrid for these photos.  And I’m happy to hear that one of the next generation of tugboat watchers has been born.

 

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