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Let’s jump back to the present . . .  and Doris Moran, both light

and moving containers across the harbor to the other container port back fields. If I count right, that’s 160 containers not on chassis pulled by trucks on the BQE, SIE, or other such clogged arteries.

Brinn Courtney is moving a scow, as

is Eastern Dawn.

Mister Jim and all the CMT boats seem to

be getting

a makeover.

Marjorie B. might be going to pick up her daily train cars.

Kimberly Poling basks in the dawn liight.

All photos, recently, in the sixth boro, WVD, who won’t be in the boro for the rumored tugboat race this weekend.  If you’re out there, take photos, especially ones with splash!

 

Let me interrupt my “out of the bayou” aka “regular programming” posts to a) announce my return to the sixth boro and b) update you on some exciting cargo that arrived in the sixth boro earlier this week.  For the first 4 photos, I’m grateful to Benjamin Moll, since I had not yet returned here when he took those.

But first, do you remember 20 Barges, the post about a delivery of that many barges on a barge in June 2016?  This is similar. Tradewinds’ Caitlin came into the sixth boro with barge Prometheus, seen below.   Prometheus is a large 300′ x 100′ barge that came to the sixth boro at least once before and reported on here, back in spring 2019.

Two tugs also tagged along as cargo.

 

Eastern Dawn provided the assist.

I took the rest of these photos.  By the way, as of today’s posting, Caitlin and Prometheus are still in town, over by the Weeks yard.

The new vessels will operate for the Haughland Group. More on Haughland tomorrow before I return to my Gulf of Mexico reporting.

Sarah D was assisting over at Weeks yesterday.

 

Many thanks to Ben for sharing his photos. Some previous posts with Ben’s photos can be seen here.

Any errors can be pinned on WVD, who provided the last four photos.

 

I’ve compartmentalized my photos from the Pioneer sail the other night, in part because in a short two-hour sail there was so much to see.  For starters, Stephanie Dann had earlier just rushed eastward and came back with Cornucopia Destiny, a dance partner on her starboard side.  I can speculate about this, but I don’t know the details.

As we headed into the Buttermilk, we met Susan Rose AND

Jordan Rose, ex- Evening Breeze and Evening Star, respectively.

This sweet downeaster passed.

I suspect Jordan came along to assist 

Susan into the notch.

Meanwhile, a ways down the piers, Stasinos Jimmy and currently still Evening Tide were rafted up for the moment.

Whatever brought Jordan to the Red Hook piers, by the time we had sailed passed the gantries, she was overtaking us.

On the return, as night began to fall, we met Thomas D. Witte and

then her fleetmate Douglas J.

At this point, my photos were pixelating, but I still managed to get Eastern Dawn, heading back to the “barn” at dusk.

All photos, WVD, who has handed the keys to the tower over to the robots again for a while.

 

All these tugboats have a common design feature.  I’ll let you figure it out. 

Eastern Dawn pushed a load of scrap westbound in the Kills.

James William showed off her bow as she traveled light toward the Upper Bay.

 

Ditto Buchanan 12, usually confined to pushing up and down the Hudson with a train of rock scows.

 

Robert IV does a plethora of jobs, spot work I think it would be called, from her base at Caddell’s.

Eastern Dawn returns from Newark Bay with a light scow.

 

And finally . . . where’s the tug pushing this deck barge with a boring machine?

It’s the shorty but mighty Jimmy!

And what they have in common is the squared off versus model bow, with knees designed for pushing.

All photos and any errors, WVD.

 

Kimberly Poling and barge lie alongside Maritime Gracious for lightering.

 

Eastern Dawn, here pushing a mini barge, continues to work in the sixth boro,

with a base over alongside the dormant Evening Tide

Bruce A. travels west in the East River after a job over near Throg’s Neck.

I love the “whitewater” on the uptown side of the 59th Street Bridge.

A mile or so behind Bruce A., Ellen McAllister passes  Rockefeller University’s River Campus.

Back exactly six years ago, pre-fab sections of the new campus building were lifted in place by a fleet of DonJon vessels here

And finally, in the late spring haze, it’s Mary Turecamo

approaching her next assist.

All photos, WVD, who’s entrusting these posts to the tugster tower robots.  Hat tip or whatever, robots.  Actually, I don’t even know how many robots are involved in this effort, since they appear happy to subsist on nothing more than the electricity I provide.

I’m trying to get together a post or two from my current location, which I was supposed to depart from a week ago . . .

Thanks for following me down memory lane the past few days, or should I say up recollections river.  My plan for the next bit is to alternate current sixth boro activity with photos from archives of the Canal Society of New York.

I love winter light, when it’s light, as it illuminates parts of NCC Reem and Captain Dann with the bunker barge.

The hot exhaust/cold air differential makes for more shimmering light this time of year.

Images are clear, but fata morgana distortions are more pronounced;  Ellen and Doris here are less than two miles away.

Here the Moran 6000 in MSC Vittoria’s shade is silhouetted, whereas the one following catches the light on its superstructure facets.

At 2 to 3 miles, it’s shimmered again, as two of the Moran 6000s sail Monaco Bridge.

Margaret returns from sailing Conti Cortesia.

And finally, with Coho in the background, it’s Eastern Dawn pushing an almost color matching fuel barge, in Balico colors.

All photos less than a week old, WVD.

I’m posting early today and can’t guarantee I’ll be able to move this on to FB the next few days because I’m traveling.  So, sign up to get new posts straight to your email.  Also check the note at the end of this post.

Here’s one that got away:  the tug to the right is the 1975 Mary Emma, ex-Evening Light.  I’d been waiting in St George hoping she’d move from Mariner’s Harbor eastbound.  Finally I gave up and boarded the ferry.  Partway to Whitehall, I noticed she was headed east, right past where I’d been.  Once in Whitehall I boarded the next ferry south, hoping to get photos near the St George side.  It’s not a great shot and it would have been if only I’d stayed put . . .   but life is full of as many missed opportunities as fulfilled ones. 

Sarah Dann (1983) recently made a big move of a crane from Wisconsin to Maine, a longer trip by water than by land.   Two years ago, she made another long tow with components for a refinery.

Franklin Reinauer (1984) has been based in the boro and carried that name since she came out of the shipyard.

Osprey (1961) is a recent newcomer to the sixth boro.

Christian Reinauer (2001) is the most powerful of this batch, with 7200 hp moving her payload.

A year ago Eastern Dawn (1978) was still painted white.

Andrea (1999) came here without the upper wheelhouse.

Thomas D. Witte (1961) and James E. Brown (2015) pass each other in the Back Channel.

Diane B (1980) seemed to drift through this part of the channel the other day. 

And finally, I believe,  Morton S. Bouchard IV (2004) is the only remaining Bouchard tugboat over at the stack in Stapleton. When will her transformation to Jesse Rose begin?

All photos, WVD, who has left the boro for a while.

By the way, a few days ago I made up some 2022 calendars, of which 17 are left for sale. I used a subjective process for selection this time. More details later but if you’re interested, email me your interest and your address. Send no money at this time, please, but prices will likely be up a tad because, of course, politics.

It’s been over a month since I did a thoroughly non-scientific sampling of ships in the boro. I’ve not gotten photos this time, but ONE Apus is back in town after a long hiatus, a time to reconstruct the cells after a Pacific mishap. 

Above, not quite a month on, Nordspring is in the Atlantic between Charleston and Gibraltar.  Al Qibla, below, is currently in the Charleston parking lot, after having been in the Savannah offshore parking lot . . . well, technically,  anchorage.

 

Stolt Larix has departed Houston for sea.

Lady Malou, between November 9 and November 29, has made it through the Panama Canal and is now at a berth in Guatemala, Pacific side.

Polar Cod is heading between Houston and the Panama Canal.

Calypso–an excellent name for a ship–has departed for the Caribbean, maybe the north coast of South America.

The sixth boro’s own Katherine Walker is in the sixth boro.  She’s named for the light keeper who for decades–until 1919– tended that light right off her stern in this photo.

This month I finally caught another of the Explorer-class CMA CGM ULCVs, Magellan. Its namesake Fernão de Magalhães got involved in lethal politics between rival groups on or near the island of Cebu.

Magellan left NYC for Savannah, and now it’s on its way to the Canal and the Pacific.

Spar Pyxis is still in the boro, discharging road salt loaded in Hereke, TR at the Duraport salt pile.

All photos, WVD, who thinks this sixth boro place is the real NYC that never sleeps.

 

The red upper wheelhouse is no more, although I’m not certain what new paint scheme will evolve, or when Evening Star will become Jordan Rose, as Evening Breeze became Susan Rose.  Follow this transformation we will.

Ellen transformed from Navy gray to McAllister colors 20 years ago.

Atlantic Salvor has worn Donjon blue–almost the same as warehouse blue–for over 20 years.

In a different way, Marjorie B profile varies from a lower to higher wheelhouse depending on the job.

Jill Reinauer has worn Reinauer colors for over 20 years also, although she has seen some modifications of profile more recently.

Brendan is currently in dry dock, but when I took this photo, she was standing by with a large barge. I’ll post a photo of her high and dry soon.

This post began with a Bouchard tug in transition.  It’s fitting to end with one that already looks quite different . . .  Evening Light is now Mary Emma. currently on Narragansett Bay.

All photos, WVD.

 

Solo and over along the Connecticut shore last week, it’s Joker, with her distinctive lines and livery.

The other dawn, Ava M. was returning from a job.  It was sunny and clear, but with all the rain of the previous day, lots of moisture remained in the air.

Taken an hour or so later, Eastern Dawn passes those same hoses and that ship, Chem Neon.

The top photo here was of a single vessel;  the next two had two each.  Beyond Christian Reinauer are two tugs and a ship to the left, and one tug to the right.

Normandy is front and center, but I count two tugs, a tanker, and a tank barge in the background.

Ditto here:  the seldom-seen (by me)  Christine M. McAllister with lots of activity in the background.

See what all is happening here:  in the foreground l to r, Kirby Moran, Treasure Coast, Miriam Moran, Sarah Ann, and Marjorie B. McAllister.  In addition, there are two tankers and a cement barge.

All photos, WVD.

And since I’ve not seen Christine M underway in quite a while, enjoy another shot below.  I count at least four vessels beyond her.

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