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Steve Munoz took the first three photos in October 1986 from Borenquin.  The tug identified as Kathryne E. McAllister appears to be the one from 1975, now known as Brendan TurecamoBorenquin lived many lives between launching in Vancouver WA in 1945 and scrapping in Beihei CH (near the northeastern border of Vietnam) in 1989. That’s indeed the Bayonne Bridge.

Here the vessels are in Newark Bay heading for Port Elizabeth.  The sun rises over Bayonne.

 

Yesterday, April 8, 2021 I caught the next set.  Eastern Dawn (Toula) was indeed heading east at dawn, pushing a barge with a crane over to Gowanus.

 

A few minutes later, Marjorie B. McAllister followed Eastern Dawn, now visible rounding the bend toward Gowanus.  I believe the tugboat beyond her is Christian Reinauer.

Thanks to Steve for sharing his archives.  The last three photos and any errors . . .  mine, WVD.

 

I can’t leave you on the Gowanus Canal as I did a week ago, so let’s head back.  Here’s a look back; small tug Jimmy moves into our location with a mini mud scow.  Btw, if you’re unfamiliar with Brooklyn’s Gowanus Canal, here‘s a bit of history.

From the inland side of the Ninth Avenue Bridge, we move through, looking toward the Hamilton Street Bridge and the BQE.  NYC DOT oversees 24 moveable bridges;  you’re looking at two of them right here. 

You’ve seen signs of “entering” and “leaving” on terrestrial thoroughfares.  This one on the Hamilton Street bridge is unusual.

We move our load of pilings, old but preserved in whatever you’d call Gowanus water.  Note the curve in the Canal just beyond the bridge.

Every day, hundreds of thousands of people travel atop this Gowanus Expressway/BQE bridge.  Maybe dozens see its underside. 

The Hamilton Avenue Marine Transfer Station has been open for just over three years.  For a look inside, click here.

In a previous post on “trashed universal product,” you can see the outbound transfer stations.  More on the whole process here.

Much more unexpected along the south bank of the Canal Bay are these “sea float” Siemens 76-MW aeroderivative gas turbines.

As much as I can tell, these units have been here for just over a year. 

Here‘s more on Vard Marine’s involvement with Siemens SeaFloat.  These must have been towed in,  Did anyone catch this?

As the spray denotes, we’ve now out of the Gowanus Canal, which may or may not be named for a Lenape chief,  and headed over to a disposal site, but that’ll be another post.  Lots more facts about the canal in the link in the previous sentence. 

Many thanks to James for the trip. All photos, interpretation, WVD.

Here are earlier installments of this.  And if you’re not familiar the the location of Gowanus or its history, check the links embedded.  If you live in the NYC area and drive or take Brooklyn subways, you have no doubt gone over it.  If you’ve wondered where the name comes from, check this alphabetical listing with great old photos.

Last week I had the opportunity to travel up the waterway, thanks to James Stasinos.  Gowanus Bay is marked by the grain elevators, (built in 1922!!), and the storage ship Loujaine.  For a full history of the cement carrier originally called Bahma, click here.

The tug was headed up the canal, as it does several times daily, is the cleanup, which has recently begun in earnest.

A bit farther in, Diane B turns John Blanche before heading across the Upper Bay. 

As we head in, we first head through the Hamilton Avenue  bridge and under the Gowanus Expressway flyover. The passage is narrow and located on a turn.

Here’s the view to port.

Once through there, we weave between a scrap yard and Lowe’s parking lot.

Above and below, that’s the Ninth Avenue bridge.  Like the Hamilton Avenue bridge, passing involves a conversation with the bridge tender.

Here we look over the bridge  and beyond while waiting for the bridge to open.

This is the view to starboard as we wait.

Once through, we arrive at the pickup site.  Note the excavator that could tell stories

 

of sifting through and removing the “black mayonnaise.”  Nuggets of historical interest are being collected for future display.   It’ll be years before this project is complete.

 

Many thanks to James for the trip.  All photos, interpretation, WVD.

Once I rowed to the head of the Canal here.  And in November 2013, I traveled up the waterway, and photos of the cargo are scattered throughout posts from late November that year. 

With the end of the year coming, it’s strangely difficult to put these posts together.  I’ve chased down several ideas the past few days, and abandoned them.   All these photos were taken in recent days, except one about a month ago.  They strike me as showing the different skies and waters of the unacknowledged boro. 

So, photos . . . like this of Christine M. McAllister, 125.5′ x 38′ and 6000 hp.  She’s returning to town after a rough encounter on Christmas day . . . .  Maybe someone else can tell the story of SS Denebola (T-AKR 289) first hand.  It’s been a while that Christine M. has appeared on this blog.

Soon to be ex-Eastern Dawn, 52′ x 22 and 1200 hp,  crosses the Upper Bay looking all resplendent in the new paint job.

Two Bouchard tugs are stacked up on the far side of Cape Henry, 109′ x 36′ and 5000 hp,  and her DBL 103, 102,000 barrel capacity barge. 

Dylan Cooper, 112′ x 35′ and 4720 hp, waits in the anchorage with RTC 108, around 108,000 barrels.

Genesis Vigilant, 98.5 x 34 and 3000 hp, also at anchor with GM 6508,  80,000 barrels capacity.

And finally . . .  misclassified on purpose, notice several things this windy morning  on the starboard side of OceanXplorer:  a tender, a helicopter, and areas marked ROV and CTD.  ROV I knew, but CTD I had to look up.  Check out this blog post by New York Media Boat.

All photos and any errors of fact or interpretation, WVD, who wishes you all a happy new year, or as my parents would say . . . gelukkig nieuwjaar.

It still says Eastern Star Dawn, but now it’s Toula!

She’s going to look great all buff and green.

Barry Silverton finally

has a lion on its stack!  All those birds?  It’s water teeming with the bunker, the bunker that recently drew a humpback into the Upper Bay.

Pelham, launched in 1960, is always a pleasant sight.  She has a list of previous names almost as long as my seasonal wish list this year.

Here she took a wake on the bow.

James William used the waters off the salt pile

as a turning basin.

And finally, after a long hiatus down south, CMT Pike has returned.  When i caught her, she was being pursued

by this container ship.

All photos, WVD.

Unrelated but of interest, below . . .

yes, Grain de Sail is a 72′ schooner coming into the sixth boro with a 50-ton cargo hold, some of it refrigerated, bringing in French wine.  She’ll set up a market in the Brooklyn Navy Yard for about a week.  Contact info and an e-shop can be found here, although you’ll have to use a machine translate if you’re not up to functionality in French.  

Grain de Sail is involved in triangular  trade, French wine to here and the Caribbean, and then Caribbean chocolate and other products to France . . . .  Something similar in sail freight  domestically has been done by Ceres and more recently by Apollonia.  The most recent international sailing cargo into the sixth boro that I know of was Black Seal, a three-masted schooner.

If you follow this blog, you know I look for novelty:  new vessels, new roles, new perspectives I don’t always even initially or ever understand.  Here’s for me a new boat, Cape Fear, 2018, another Sassafras class tug.

 

Brendan Turecamo, 1975,  has appeared here many times, but in the past week, I’ve seen her in two configurations, doing ship assist below and

slinging barge Connecticut below.  Yes, it’s the same tug, house down or house up.

With the bronze monument, aka Teardrop Memorial, in the background, Marjorie B. McAllister delivers nearly a dozen rail cars on NYNJ100

to cross over the harbor from NJ to NY. The run is usually performed by Brown tugs.

Chemical Pioneer, a sixth boro icon, here is assisted into the anchorage by  . . . Franklin Reinauer.

Matthew Tibbetts stands by as Dylan Cooper (correct me if I’m wrong) with RTC 108 lighters Gulf Coral. 

Taking a break from the dredge project over by Sandy Hook, Neptune travels west in the KVK.

Sea Lion pushes a barge westbound on the East River, past the old banana pier and Vladick Houses of the Lower East Side in the background.

Ivory Coast stands by with an Express Marine (former owner?) barge over in the Wallabout section of the East River. 

Christian Reinauer and barge RTC 145 stand by over in the anchorage below Fort Wadsworth.

And finally . . .  over in Red Hook, Eastern Dawn hangs alongside Meaghan Marie. Stand by for a new paint job of Eastern Dawn.

All photos, any errors, solely mine, WVD.

All photos here were taken less than an hour after sunrise.  It’s commonly known that the golden hour is the best time for photos.

 

Mary Turecamo also headed out for morning work, not that this is anything but a 24/7 essential schedule.

HMS St Andrews arrives with sunrise on its back. Has the HMS been dropped from the name,

just as port of registry has been changed?

Eastern Dawn slings Port Chester into the dock.

Ellen heads out,

meeting a Vane tug on her way to a job.

Cape Henry comes off the anchorage, westbound on the KVK.

All photos, WVD.

 

Indulge me a little misdirection first..  So you suppose the Hughes 130 is loaded with ferry fuel?

I thought the tug here is Little C, but this one is too small.  Anyone identify?

Eastern Dawn is a regular in the sixth boro, and

[oh, go back to the top photo and you’ll see Eastern Dawn with a fuel barge] and the other morning I discovered an answer to a long-standing question I had.  Do those fuel barges with names like “No. 5” and “No. 6”  ever move?

The answer is . . . I caught Eastern Dawn move in with a barge and then transfer fuel from it to

to the stationery barges next to the ferry terminal on the Staten Island side.

Hook it up and pump the fuel into the barge until it gets pumped again . . . into the the ferry tank.

All photos and speculation, WVD.  Below is another recent photo of Eastern Dawn with its barge–Port Chester–light.

 

 

Delta Mule was Grand Eagle before that.  Today it’s better known around the sixth boro as Eastern Dawn.

Sea Ox was the second name of this vessel, after Lief S.  Since Inland Sea it moved on to Brooklyn and now is known as Charlotte V.  If raised letters were changed each time, all that heat would make for enough of a ceremony, a necessary requirement to avoid Poseidon’s penalty. 

Thanks to Lisa Kolibabek, here’s a view of the step by step erasure and replacement, which reminds me of tattoo removal.

Chesapeake needs to come off along with the place of registry before Kristin Poling comes on.

The final result looks shipyard-launch new.

Some tired old vessels might beg for a renaming in steel;  Resolute today is called Ocean King.

This one puzzles me, because I found that the current ARC Patriot used to be Aida.  Why the F and the O, Fidelio?

Here’s another puzzle . . . Iron Salvor has been in Tottenville for a few weeks, but

in raised letters, she was Ocean Raider 17.  Anyone know what she’s doing it the bro?  Was she US built?

Thanks to Lisa for the photos of Chesapeake–Kristin Poling.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

On the cusp of wintriness if not winter per se, the Hudson Valley is spectacular.  Let’s start with Fred Johannsen pushing this crane barge northward.  That’s the Kingston-Rhinecliff Bridge aka George Clinton Memorial Bridge (DeWitt Clinton’s uncle)  in the distance.

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Here Treasure Coast urges Cement Transporter 7700–one I’ve never seen before–the last mile to the cement dock.

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This reflection was so magical, I needed to include this closer-up.

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Emerald Coast pushes a fuel barge downstream.

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Sarah D moves a motley pair of scows upstream.

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Eastern Dawn moves a fuel barge downstream.

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Mr Russell shifts a barge near the TZ Bridge.  What is in those tanks?

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Might that be Marion Moran pushing sugar barge Somerset up toward Yonkers?

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I believe this is Doris Moran moving cement barge Adelaide downriver.

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And as a last-but-not-least photo today, here’s Cornell conducting a TOAR sign off session.  Here’s a post I did three years ago with the same activity but using a different barge.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has a proposal below:

If you are working Thursday and therefore having lunch and/or dinner at work–whether on a vessel or in some other work setting–and you choose to take a photo of the dinner–any aspect of the meal–and send it to me, please do and I’ll try to devise a post with it on Friday this week.  Thanks for the consideration.

Also, you may be “choosing” ed out by now, but here’s a set of thoughtful, well-reasoned and -articulated perspectives on the Hudson anchorages question that is open to public discussion until early December.

Also, if you’re planning to be at the WorkBoat show in New Orleans next week,  I’ll be wandering around there, maybe looking for some extra work.  I hope to see you.

 

 

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