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Kimberly Poling and barge lie alongside Maritime Gracious for lightering.

 

Eastern Dawn, here pushing a mini barge, continues to work in the sixth boro,

with a base over alongside the dormant Evening Tide

Bruce A. travels west in the East River after a job over near Throg’s Neck.

I love the “whitewater” on the uptown side of the 59th Street Bridge.

A mile or so behind Bruce A., Ellen McAllister passes  Rockefeller University’s River Campus.

Back exactly six years ago, pre-fab sections of the new campus building were lifted in place by a fleet of DonJon vessels here

And finally, in the late spring haze, it’s Mary Turecamo

approaching her next assist.

All photos, WVD, who’s entrusting these posts to the tugster tower robots.  Hat tip or whatever, robots.  Actually, I don’t even know how many robots are involved in this effort, since they appear happy to subsist on nothing more than the electricity I provide.

I’m trying to get together a post or two from my current location, which I was supposed to depart from a week ago . . .

Thanks for following me down memory lane the past few days, or should I say up recollections river.  My plan for the next bit is to alternate current sixth boro activity with photos from archives of the Canal Society of New York.

I love winter light, when it’s light, as it illuminates parts of NCC Reem and Captain Dann with the bunker barge.

The hot exhaust/cold air differential makes for more shimmering light this time of year.

Images are clear, but fata morgana distortions are more pronounced;  Ellen and Doris here are less than two miles away.

Here the Moran 6000 in MSC Vittoria’s shade is silhouetted, whereas the one following catches the light on its superstructure facets.

At 2 to 3 miles, it’s shimmered again, as two of the Moran 6000s sail Monaco Bridge.

Margaret returns from sailing Conti Cortesia.

And finally, with Coho in the background, it’s Eastern Dawn pushing an almost color matching fuel barge, in Balico colors.

All photos less than a week old, WVD.

I’m posting early today and can’t guarantee I’ll be able to move this on to FB the next few days because I’m traveling.  So, sign up to get new posts straight to your email.  Also check the note at the end of this post.

Here’s one that got away:  the tug to the right is the 1975 Mary Emma, ex-Evening Light.  I’d been waiting in St George hoping she’d move from Mariner’s Harbor eastbound.  Finally I gave up and boarded the ferry.  Partway to Whitehall, I noticed she was headed east, right past where I’d been.  Once in Whitehall I boarded the next ferry south, hoping to get photos near the St George side.  It’s not a great shot and it would have been if only I’d stayed put . . .   but life is full of as many missed opportunities as fulfilled ones. 

Sarah Dann (1983) recently made a big move of a crane from Wisconsin to Maine, a longer trip by water than by land.   Two years ago, she made another long tow with components for a refinery.

Franklin Reinauer (1984) has been based in the boro and carried that name since she came out of the shipyard.

Osprey (1961) is a recent newcomer to the sixth boro.

Christian Reinauer (2001) is the most powerful of this batch, with 7200 hp moving her payload.

A year ago Eastern Dawn (1978) was still painted white.

Andrea (1999) came here without the upper wheelhouse.

Thomas D. Witte (1961) and James E. Brown (2015) pass each other in the Back Channel.

Diane B (1980) seemed to drift through this part of the channel the other day. 

And finally, I believe,  Morton S. Bouchard IV (2004) is the only remaining Bouchard tugboat over at the stack in Stapleton. When will her transformation to Jesse Rose begin?

All photos, WVD, who has left the boro for a while.

By the way, a few days ago I made up some 2022 calendars, of which 17 are left for sale. I used a subjective process for selection this time. More details later but if you’re interested, email me your interest and your address. Send no money at this time, please, but prices will likely be up a tad because, of course, politics.

It’s been over a month since I did a thoroughly non-scientific sampling of ships in the boro. I’ve not gotten photos this time, but ONE Apus is back in town after a long hiatus, a time to reconstruct the cells after a Pacific mishap. 

Above, not quite a month on, Nordspring is in the Atlantic between Charleston and Gibraltar.  Al Qibla, below, is currently in the Charleston parking lot, after having been in the Savannah offshore parking lot . . . well, technically,  anchorage.

 

Stolt Larix has departed Houston for sea.

Lady Malou, between November 9 and November 29, has made it through the Panama Canal and is now at a berth in Guatemala, Pacific side.

Polar Cod is heading between Houston and the Panama Canal.

Calypso–an excellent name for a ship–has departed for the Caribbean, maybe the north coast of South America.

The sixth boro’s own Katherine Walker is in the sixth boro.  She’s named for the light keeper who for decades–until 1919– tended that light right off her stern in this photo.

This month I finally caught another of the Explorer-class CMA CGM ULCVs, Magellan. Its namesake Fernão de Magalhães got involved in lethal politics between rival groups on or near the island of Cebu.

Magellan left NYC for Savannah, and now it’s on its way to the Canal and the Pacific.

Spar Pyxis is still in the boro, discharging road salt loaded in Hereke, TR at the Duraport salt pile.

All photos, WVD, who thinks this sixth boro place is the real NYC that never sleeps.

 

The red upper wheelhouse is no more, although I’m not certain what new paint scheme will evolve, or when Evening Star will become Jordan Rose, as Evening Breeze became Susan Rose.  Follow this transformation we will.

Ellen transformed from Navy gray to McAllister colors 20 years ago.

Atlantic Salvor has worn Donjon blue–almost the same as warehouse blue–for over 20 years.

In a different way, Marjorie B profile varies from a lower to higher wheelhouse depending on the job.

Jill Reinauer has worn Reinauer colors for over 20 years also, although she has seen some modifications of profile more recently.

Brendan is currently in dry dock, but when I took this photo, she was standing by with a large barge. I’ll post a photo of her high and dry soon.

This post began with a Bouchard tug in transition.  It’s fitting to end with one that already looks quite different . . .  Evening Light is now Mary Emma. currently on Narragansett Bay.

All photos, WVD.

 

Solo and over along the Connecticut shore last week, it’s Joker, with her distinctive lines and livery.

The other dawn, Ava M. was returning from a job.  It was sunny and clear, but with all the rain of the previous day, lots of moisture remained in the air.

Taken an hour or so later, Eastern Dawn passes those same hoses and that ship, Chem Neon.

The top photo here was of a single vessel;  the next two had two each.  Beyond Christian Reinauer are two tugs and a ship to the left, and one tug to the right.

Normandy is front and center, but I count two tugs, a tanker, and a tank barge in the background.

Ditto here:  the seldom-seen (by me)  Christine M. McAllister with lots of activity in the background.

See what all is happening here:  in the foreground l to r, Kirby Moran, Treasure Coast, Miriam Moran, Sarah Ann, and Marjorie B. McAllister.  In addition, there are two tankers and a cement barge.

All photos, WVD.

And since I’ve not seen Christine M underway in quite a while, enjoy another shot below.  I count at least four vessels beyond her.

With Eastern Dawn in the foreground, the massive scale of these box boats is apparent.

Foreshortening gives the illusion that MSC Lauren cannot possibly avoid a collision.

Although this may be her first arrival in the sixth boro, this 12400 teu vessel has sailed the seas for a decade already.

See the crewman near the port bow quarter?

Now you see him?

 

If I recall correctly, she arrived here from Jamaica;  from here she travels to Italy.

Again . . . Linda L. Miller and the 6000 hp tugs show scale.  MSC Lauren is one of 560 container vessels operated by MSC, the second largest shipping company in the world.  Know the largest?  The third largest?  Answers are here.

So here’s a merger of truckster! and ULCVs, a photo I took last week from a parking lot.  I know what was loaded into that 20′ MSC container.  I invite you to guess.  Answer will be posted tomorrow . . . .

All photos, WVD, who is always happy to collaborate.

 

May Day!  It’s a busy day without access to my archives.  May 2011 . . .  Urger in Lyons NY, waiting for the dry dock to flood.

Back in the sixth boro, it’s Elk River and Siberian Sea…eastbound at Con Hook, and  

near the same location, it’s Lincoln Sea and Eastern Dawn, both westbound.

Greenland Sea . . . also westbound.

Barbara McAllister has long gone from the boro, as have some of the vessels above and below. 

Others, like Eagle Service, have been renamed. 

This Ken’s Marine Service boat I saw once, and I’d still love to know the story and current disposition.  Anyone?

Shelby Rose is still in the boro, but when I last saw her at a dock, her vivid livery was greatly faded.

Gazela is still in Philly.  She arrived here in May 2011 to dock at Atlantic Salt, I believe, in a driving rain.

And in late May, the orange Blue Marlin arrived in town for the longer-than-expected loading process of some boats sold to Nigerian interests. If I recall correctly, that Trumpy (?) yacht is still in the boro.

Happy May Day . . .  smell the flowers, work in the garden, or even dance around the pole today if you are so inclined.  Or, you might choose to adopt the May Day tradition of  University of St. Andrews students in Scotland . . .

All photos from the archives . . .  WVD. 

Steve Munoz took the first three photos in October 1986 from Borenquin.  The tug identified as Kathryne E. McAllister appears to be the one from 1975, now known as Brendan TurecamoBorenquin lived many lives between launching in Vancouver WA in 1945 and scrapping in Beihei CH (near the northeastern border of Vietnam) in 1989. That’s indeed the Bayonne Bridge.

Here the vessels are in Newark Bay heading for Port Elizabeth.  The sun rises over Bayonne.

 

Yesterday, April 8, 2021 I caught the next set.  Eastern Dawn (Toula) was indeed heading east at dawn, pushing a barge with a crane over to Gowanus.

 

A few minutes later, Marjorie B. McAllister followed Eastern Dawn, now visible rounding the bend toward Gowanus.  I believe the tugboat beyond her is Christian Reinauer.

Thanks to Steve for sharing his archives.  The last three photos and any errors . . .  mine, WVD.

 

I can’t leave you on the Gowanus Canal as I did a week ago, so let’s head back.  Here’s a look back; small tug Jimmy moves into our location with a mini mud scow.  Btw, if you’re unfamiliar with Brooklyn’s Gowanus Canal, here‘s a bit of history.

From the inland side of the Ninth Avenue Bridge, we move through, looking toward the Hamilton Street Bridge and the BQE.  NYC DOT oversees 24 moveable bridges;  you’re looking at two of them right here. 

You’ve seen signs of “entering” and “leaving” on terrestrial thoroughfares.  This one on the Hamilton Street bridge is unusual.

We move our load of pilings, old but preserved in whatever you’d call Gowanus water.  Note the curve in the Canal just beyond the bridge.

Every day, hundreds of thousands of people travel atop this Gowanus Expressway/BQE bridge.  Maybe dozens see its underside. 

The Hamilton Avenue Marine Transfer Station has been open for just over three years.  For a look inside, click here.

In a previous post on “trashed universal product,” you can see the outbound transfer stations.  More on the whole process here.

Much more unexpected along the south bank of the Canal Bay are these “sea float” Siemens 76-MW aeroderivative gas turbines.

As much as I can tell, these units have been here for just over a year. 

Here‘s more on Vard Marine’s involvement with Siemens SeaFloat.  These must have been towed in,  Did anyone catch this?

As the spray denotes, we’ve now out of the Gowanus Canal, which may or may not be named for a Lenape chief,  and headed over to a disposal site, but that’ll be another post.  Lots more facts about the canal in the link in the previous sentence. 

Many thanks to James for the trip. All photos, interpretation, WVD.

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