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It should be no secret that I’m an early riser, have always been one to get up in the “o’dark” hours for the morning golden hour, the best time of day.  Here are two Miller’s Launch OSVs, possibly Rana and Rosemary.

 

A bit later on a different day, I caught Dylan Cooper westbound, with another Reinauer unit off in the distance.

 

Janet D headed into that  same morning, here eastbound.

Ditto . . .  Charles D McAllister and

Mary Turecamo.  In fact, in the photo below, you see all three.   Did you get the golden hour this morning?

All photos, WVD, who thinks this morning’s overcast skies here blocked any gold.

 

Random Tugs 001” I posted in October 2007, 14 years ago.  The motivation for such a post then, as now, comes from the observation that what passes you by, either on the water, the roadway, or even the sidewalk or hallway, is often just random.  It’s foolish to look for meaning or significance where there is none. So here’s installment 339.

Genesis Glory, 1979, 3900 and 120′ x 34′

Janet D, 2015, 1320, and 67′ x 26′

Sarah D, 1975, 2000, and 90′ x 29′

HMS Justice, 2013, 2000, and 75′ x 30′

Sarah Ann, 2003, 2700, and 78′ x 26′

Charles D. McAllister, 1967, 1800, and 94′ x 29′

Durham . . . I’ve seen her a long time, I believe she’s operated by Ken’s Marine, but I don’t know anything more.

Kodi with Hayward back by the bridge.  Kodi dates back to 1974, under 500, and 43′ x 15′, I think.

L. M. Caddell works near the floating dry docks. The upper wheelhouses at the Reinauer yard in the background, I’d guess Dace, Stephen, and JoAnne III.  I’m sure I’ll be corrected.  I don’t believe the shorter “upper house” to the right is installed on a tugboat.  Now I’m really sure I’ll be corrected.  As for simple specs on the Caddell yard tug . . . sorry.

Coho, 2008, 4000, and 111′ x 36′

All photos, WVD, and happy “fly the official flag day.

April 1, 2011 … and this was not a joke.  More on this distressed vessel at the end of this post.

McCormack Boys and

Turecamo Girls with Barney Turecamo.  All three are still working in the same liveries, I believe.

Long Island-built Escort was phased out as a certain coal-fired power plant shut down.  She’s taken on new life as Northstar Innovator, based on NJ’s

Maurice River, although I’ve yet to see her. 

Stad Amsterdam is not currently in Amsterdam;  she’s not far away though in Scheveningen.  If you want to pronounce this shibboleth as a Dutch speaker would, have a listen. 

Spring sunrises . . .  Coming into port is the 2017-scrapped Atlantic Cartier

escorted by Ellen McAllister and

passing Bow Clipper and Maria J.  That tug is now Nicholas Vinik. Bow Clipper is now in Santos Brasil. 

The venerable Chemical Pioneer was ushered in by Ellen McAllister and McAllister Responder. I say “venerable” because she was built using the stern of Sea Witch, after a massive conflagration in the port, told here by the Fire Fighter site.   .

Two small USMMA boats made their way through the fog.   I’m not sure the name of the vessel to the left, but the one to the right was Growler and she’s back (though hidden away) in the sixth boro.

Of course, I post a photo of Kristin Poling, which had only a few months of service left at this point. She started service in 1934 as Poughkeepsie Socony.

Marion M . . . I’ve been told she was sold to parties in the Chesapeake who planned to restore her and put her up for sale in 2018.  Does anyone have an update on that?

And finally, we return to Le Papillon . . .  the 48′ steel schooner was dragged off the beach but I lost track of her after that.  I believe she was cut up.

It all seems like stuff from long ago . .    all photos, WVD.

Enjoy more late afternoon photos here . . .  like Alexandra, passing in front of a number of cranes, both on the water, near the water, and atop buildings.

Ava transits the Con Hook Range, with three East River bridges in the background.

Miriam heads in the direction of the Bayonne Bridge, with two Arthur Kill bridge and the Linden refinery in the background.

Janet D with a crane barge passes here in front of a lower Manhattan, and a reprise of those cranes.

Brian Nicholas here brings DS159 eastbound for a refill.

Ellen McAllister weaves between KVK vessels on its way to a job.

Gulf Coast transits the KVK in front of Sailors Snug Harbor, with cranes at Caddells defining points in the western sky.

And to close, it’s Calusa Coast with barge Delaware, recently returned from five or so years in the Great Lakes.   Note the Statue, the south end of Ellis Island, and the Jersey City wall of buildings in the distance.

All photos, WVD.

The first boat I saw in the morning fog was buff and green . . .  Meaghan Marie, moving what appeared to be a Cashman spud barge.

Meeting her was Vane’s Philadelphia.  I’m curious . . . do any readers have a photo of a Vane unit operating on thew Great Lakes or arriving there via the Saint Lawrence?

I could hear Shannon Dann‘s EMDs throbbing as she moved Weeks 105

Pathfinder moved light trash containers to a marine transfer station.

A light Treasure Coast headed from Duraport to the Upper Bay.

Seeley pushed sand scow Weeks 250 eastbound.

As the sun started to burn through the morning clouds, Janet D made her way to a job.

Pegasus returned from a job, out ahead of two Moran assist tugs.

St. Andrews got underway from the Centerline dock.

Brendan headed off to an assist.

And just as I needed to leave, Franklin showed up to assist Gracie out of her dock.

All photos, WVD.

Call this the late winter dance of Janet D and James E. I’ve gotten some email from readers saying they appreciate the photos as a distraction from a world turned upside down.  So I hope bright photos of a dance make a luminous moment in your day.

The two tugs here were arranging a crane barge along a dock, and to my unschooled eyes it appeared the barge was not cooperating.  Either that, or the current was not cooperating.  But enough of my words;  watch for yourself.  These photos were taken over a half hour duration.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hat tip to the crews who seemed to end up with that barge precisely where they wanted it.

All photos, WVD, who used to be just a hermit but now is a practiced social distancer.

I’m not disparaging, but my first thought was “just another” Vane tug heading across the bow, until

we passed and I noticed it was Charleston, which I believe is Vane’s newest tug in the sixth boro.

The new “ubiquitous” vessels on the sixth boro waterways move containerized trash.  Pathfinder is one of the tugboats assigned to this duty.   Covanta first got the contract for this business in 2013, and my first knowledge of these barges was here.

Two different generations of McAllister tugboats headed out recently, Capt. Brian A. and

Ellen.   Launched a half century apart and having a difference of almost 3000 hp, they are both working daily assisting ships in the harbor.

Janet D is a mere five years old and works in marine construction, working for the aptly named Construction and Marine Equipment Co.

Franklin Reinauer was built and christened by that name in 1984.

It appears to me here that Linda L. Miller, the truckable tug, is the prime mover, pushing Catherine C. Miller.  Click to enlarge the photo and you’ll see a handsome spread of Manhattan architecture, sans the peaks.

And let’s conclude with Mister Jim, who back in 2016 did not have the gray/red livery.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who missed the return of Atlantic Enterprise this morning, back from the work in Georgia.

A few weeks ago I posted photos erroneously identified as Dorothy J, even though plain as day Robert IV was on the bow.   That’s called distraction.  But the photo below, plain as day, is Dorothy J.  Here was Dorothy J on a foggy morning upriver almost two years ago.

Plain as day again . . .  Rebecca Ann in the KVK eastbound, and again

in a photo from Bob Stopper, plain as day way up the Erie Canal just below lock E27 with a barge loaded with reef fodder.  Here are previous photos from Bob.

Frances pushes a loaded scow westbound on the KVK, and

Janet D moves a spud barge over to the westside tower of the VZ Bridge, about to duck behind Sider Miami, previously known as Asian Prosperity.

Tug Ireland (renamed Hoppiness) has left the sixth boro for good

and is currently in the fresh waters of the Erie Canal, where I might see her soon.

Closing this post out, it’s an unnamed (to me) tug pushing a deck barge at the intersection of Hell Gate East River and the Harlem River.   The bridges there are the Triborough and the Hell Gate.

Thanks to Bob for his photo from Lyons;  all other photos by Will Van Dorp, who will be leaving the sixth boro tomorrow for a lot of weeks.

 

Some “infra structuring” for cars, trucks, buses requires barges and boats.

In past months I’ve done a number of posts where bridgework is, if not the foreground, then certainly the background.  The other day I was fortunate to catch Janet D moving barge Patricia sound to perform some of the work.

Janet D shuttled her barge and crew between the towers during breaks in ship traffic.

 

After all, how can you get materials and tools onto the island once occupied by Fort Lafayette with boats . . .

Scale is evident

once the bridge crew start the climb to work station . . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

This Bob Hill OT/B creation juxtaposes well with the ever-changing skyline of lower Manhattan, as seen from the East River.

Meredith C. is timing her eastbound trip with a fair tide through the Gate.

Catching the same tide, it’s Evening Star.

Farther SW, Gracie M. makes her way around Bergen Point.

Evening Breeze is a Bouchard new build, only recently arrived here.

On this sunny morning, Janet D pushes a Hughes construction barge past

an inbound scrap bulker.

And in closing, notice the soft spring colors of the trees along the KVK as

Dylan Cooper pushes her barge into the Upper Bay.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose energy level is rising along with the outdoor temperatures.

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