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One more to underscore the increasing frequency of a variety of these boats . . . Brooks McCall even today is working an area of Long Island Sound between Plum Island and Fishers Island.

That’s Millstone Point in the background. 

Brooks McCall is slightly older and longer than Miss Emma McCall, from yesterday’s post.  Brooks appears to operate out of the Thames River. 

Note above three towed surface “sleds” (not sure what they are called) attached to the boat, as seen below.  

This is the best I could do from a bit 

over a mile distance . . . .

Abreast of us, she turned to starboard and showed

her arm.

All photos last week, WVD. 

Here’s where TDI worked earlier.  “Our specialty is the survey, geotechnical and benthic components of these wind farm projects,” according to their CEO.

 

It’s a new year, and with today’s and tomorrow’s post, I’m retiring the label “exotic” as I’ve used it to describe vessels related to offshore wind development efforts.  Consider the photo below:  three such vessels appear, l to r:  Fugro Enterprise, Miss Emma McCall, and HOS Browning.  Since all three are offshore wind farm related and have become regulars in the sixth boro, it’s time to come up with a new descriptor for them.  “Wind power boats” or WPB comes to mind;  that would be different than “wind boats” or “power boats.”  Maybe you have a better term?   I suspect these vessels will continue to become more frequent.

The Fugro boat here had just departed the Reynolds dock after a short stop, and 

I suspect the TDI-Brooks boat is heading there next. 

I wish I could have gotten closer-up photos of the gear alongside Miss Emma McCall‘s port side.

My best guess is that it’s a side scan sonar probe. 

After leaving Reynolds, Fugro Enterprise turned outbound and 

I caught this view of a similar device suspended on wires off her port side. 

Some time prior, HOS Browning departed the sixth boro

with this gear on the stern and under the folded down A-frame

for a short stint off Atlantic City.  Browning is now back in the boro. 

All photos, WVD.

Here were parts one and two of this title. 

 

If you read this blog regularly, you’ll recall I spent a large part of June and July on a liftboat called Legs III.  A similar liftboat called Ram VII did some work in the sixth boro in September.   Now for parts of November and December, a huge liftboat has operated off the South Fork of Long Island, and recently came in to dock in Bridgeport CT.  Legs III legs are currently around 70′.  Ram VII legs are 145′.  Any guesses on the height of the legs on the liftboat below?

Legs III had two cranes;  L/B Jill has four, with the largest a capacity of 500 tons, and a 140′ boom.   The other cranes have lifting capacity of 60, 25, and 10 tons. 

Another Secor vessel was also docked at Barnum’s Landing, but I’ll save that for another post. 

L/B Jill has an impressive helideck, capable of supporting helicopters no larger/heavier than a Sikorski S-92, which weighs just shy of 14 tons.

 

Note the life boats and lifer aft canisters.  Jill operates with 12 crew and can accommodate up to 136 passengers, i.e., technicians usually on whatever project

it’s supporting in depths up to 275′.   This means that Jill could “leg down” in almost any part of Long Island Sound.  Dimensions on Jill are 178′ x 135′.

Liftboats have been described as combination of a cargo vessel, crane ship, hotel, and restaurant. 

I’m not sure how long Jill will be at Barnum’s Landing or what exactly it’s doing there. 

All photos, any errors, WVD.  For more info on Jill, as well as some great layout drawings, click here. As to the length of legs, she’s a 335 class;  usually that number represents the length of legs.

If you’re wondering about that name Barnum, the reference is indeed to Phineas Taylor Barnum, the showman, entrepreneur, and politician; the guy who said things like these . . .

I like reader-submitted photos, especially when they show something I’ve not seen before, like this black low-profile unit, which may or may not have the name Elizabeth II,  in front of this Kirby inland barge.  Photo was taken somewhere west of Atchafalaya Bay by eastriver. 

See the unit at the bow of that barge?

Prime mover here is Louisa Frances.  So what is that forward unit? 

It’s a “bow boat,” as in here.  Scroll through and you’ll see a version called Chuck Norris and a Steermaster here

Next topic . . . after a reference and comments here, Jan vander Doe sent along this photo of an opduwer on a Dutch waterway below.  Literally the Dutch “opduwer” translates as “up pusher,” once again proving that tow boats can push, and push boats can tow . . . as long as they have the right deck fittings. 

Third . . .  the mobile boat lift that’s been at Bayonne Dry dock for a year and a half now was christened yesterday as Christopher Edward.  Read this story here

I’m happy to read this, although I’ve not heard of a travel lift or mobile boat hauler bearing a name.  On the other hand, the floating dry docks at Caddells have numbers and names

Finally, I caught an “exotic” heading out of the sixth boro the other day.  She’s been in and out before, but…. like I said… I finally got a photo of 

Miss Emma McCall.  A fleetmate–Brooks McCall –has been operating in the LI Sound and Narragansett Bay, but I’m not up there much.  To digress, would anyone up on Sound and N Bay send me photos of unusual vessels now and again?  I know the wind farm work is bringing in lots of exotics to southern New England ports. 

More on TDI Brooks and this vessel can be found by clicking on those links. 

Thanks to eastriver and Jan for their photos;  all others and any errors . . . WVD. 

 

The sixth boro and other harbors have those vessels that seem to hide in plain sight.  Maybe it’s more accurate to say these craft, like the one below,  are visible but their usage might not be so clear.   

Here’s how Annie Moore gets described:  “a utility vessel for the National Park Service designed to transport national and international VIPs to the Statue of Liberty.”   That’s vague and not vague at the same time.  Who are these national and international VIPs, I wonder. 

Here’s more:  “to transport VIPs, official passengers, supplies and equipment to Ellis Island from Battery Park, New York, NY.”    Only Battery Park?  Some contradictions exist in these two pubs.

As many questions as I have with Annie Moore, when HOS Browning came back into port after some days offshore, I have even more.

 I know what the boat does, but I crave specifics.  For HOS Browning, I’d like to know where they went, why that location, what specifically was accomplished with which tools and to what end . . . .

In port, what and who leaves the ship and what and who comes aboard?  Maybe that makes me a landlubber with too much time on my hands . . . .  Who are the crew?

See the name on the bow of the high speed vessel below?  Clearly, it’s not THIS Sea Vixen,  but somewhere in the weapons “kit” carried on Ro8 HMS QE is an enterprise called Project Vixen, involving aerial drones, and named for the de Havilland DH.110 Sea Vixen carrier-based fleet air-defense fighter.  

Technically, the vessel above and below is a 43′ PTB, a personnel transport boat, and  “the HMS Queen Elizabeth class will each carry four PTBs made by Blyth-based company Alnmaritec. Each 13.1 m (43 ft) long PTB carries 36 passengers and two crew to operate the vessel.”  Find more photos here.

The PTB seemed to be flitting all around the boro, checking out the sights.  Who gets to ride the Sea Vixen and who the larger sixth boro-based PTB, whose name I didn’t catch.

Why those sights?  Had HMS Prince of Wales come to town as planned, it would have had evolved PTBs, such as the one here

All photos, any errors, WVD, who’s always looking for novelty.

I’m not exactly sure what HOS Browning does each time she goes to sea,

but she has a lot of deck space, and a derrick to work with.   It turns out I’ve seen ship before down in Port Fourchon eight years ago, when she went by the name Betty Pfankuch.

Specs on this Mexico-flagged vessel can be downloaded and read here. Of interest are the facts that HOS Browning was built in the same shipyard as the new ferries and that the owner and manager is the same company that owns/operates the liftboat Ram VII recently featured here. Also, why is a US-built, Mexican-flagged vessel being used?

This general arrangement  diagram shows the location of a “future hydro-acoustic thru-hull” midships.   I suppose that means that now that 34″ thru-hull has now been opened up.  On that same diagram, would the mud tanks still be in place?  

Given the yellow “cage” near the stern, I’m surprised there’s no A-frame for deploying it, unless it’s been stowed/dismantled while in port.

All photos, any errors, lots of questions, WVD.

For what might be considered an exotic among exotics, let’s go back to Pete Ludlow’s photos,  meet Windserve Odyssey.  

As an all-purpose offshore wind farm support vessel, it is just one vessel type that will be more common in the years to come.  The blog alluded to this particular vessel and a possible transit through the sixth boro back last September.   Pete’s photo here confirms that it did transit back on the first day of 2022.  

Hat tip and thanks, Pete, for catching this. 

Tugster is still gallivanting far away from the sixth boro, will be for the better part of a week yet, leaving the robots in charge.  We test the perimeter, push the parameters, but in our own robotic ways, support the mission.

 

 

In my view, the sixth boro sees the regular traffic, the less regular, the new ones (new hulls or just new names) and then there are the exotics, vessels that might ever call here only once.  Vos Star is certainly an exotic, even though it had been working off SE Long Island for the past month.  I knew it was in Elizabethport and hoped I would be able to see it when it departed, and I did!

VOS expands to Vroon Offshore Services, and Vos Star is designed and equipped for a number of offshore services, in this case, assocated with offshore windfarm support.

The joy of shooting these photos as a vessel travels west to east is that you get lighted image as it approaches and then dramatically backlit photo as it recedes.  This was daybreak yesterday.  Had it departed an hour earlier, I’d have no photos to show.

The 2016 Fujian-built vessel is 223′ x 49′ and homeported in SW Netherlands. 

I’m not sure what its next job is, but AIS showed its next stop as East Dunkirk . . .  Belgium France.

Safe travels.

All photos, WVD.

 

If you focus on national weather, you might imagine snow has fallen to the extent that we’re back in the ice age, but I decided to walk out to the fishing pier near Owl’s Head, and 

voila!  there were Unico’s Teresa with Acadia as well as Regulus, bathed in rainbow light. Likely it was raining in Manhattan, but not on me, nor was it snowing.

More photos from my walk tomorrow, but I’m guessing Regulus is in port because of big seas out where she’s been working in the Bight. 

All photos this morning, WVD, who has previously seen rainbows in the boro here

 

It’s a quick post today, since I’m on a short gallivant.  When I took a hike this morning and saw two cardinals on a snowy branch, I knew exactly it was time to post a photo I took earlier this week of Fugro Enterprise,

a vessel that reminds me of a cardinal with some traces of snow I’ll bet they never see in Patterson LA, a town I drove through last month and where the temperature today is 78!

Both photos, WVD, who’s posted photos of Fugro Enterprise before here. Strange, in “autocorrect logic,” Fugro wants to be “furor.”

If you’re a new reader on this blog or just wonder why such a vessel exists, here are full specs from the Fugro website.

 

 

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