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And finally, a few more from Rich Taylor.  Stadt Zurich was built in 1909

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and Stadt Rapperswil built 1914 in short term layup when he was there on June 16, 2016.   I believe these are the last two steamers on Lake Zurich.

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Many thanks to Rich Taylor, who has planted the idea of visiting these lakes steamers some sunny day.

Let’s return to Lake Lucerne, with this photo.  Rich Taylor took it in late June 2016.  PS Uri was built in 1901.   Uri is a canton in Switzerland.

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And PS Unterwalden, 1902.  Unterwalden is the name of a former canton.  I profess as much ignorance of Swiss geography, as of their history, but I’m learning.

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If you travel to the SW from Lucerne, you get to Interlaken, where Rich took the following photos of PS Lötschberg, built 1914.

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Looking at these photos, and thinking of other vessels from this era–in both good and deteriorated condition–it’s clear that part of the secret is maintenance.

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The next three photos of Blümlisalp–1906–were taken at Thun on Lake Thun, which I also had to look up.

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Again, all these photos of Swiss steamers come thanks to Rich Taylor.  Earlier this year and last, Rich send along these photos.

I’ve never been to the Swiss Lakes, but I’m grateful to Rich Taylor, who spent some time there this summer, for these photos of paddle steamers.  PS Gallia dates from 1913 and

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PS Schiller, below, from 1906.  Rich writes, “We sailed aboard at every opportunity, on occasion having a prepared meal from the on board galley. They are a integral part of the Swiss transit system and as such covered by the Swiss Travel Pass making connections with other boats, trains, hotels, lakeside villages; all very pleasant.”

Note the puff of steam?  Rich writes, “When one steamboat passes another,  advance announcement is made by the captain; then there is a whistle salute from each.”  I wonder if part of that advance announcement is to cover your ears if you are close to the whistle.

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PS William Tell built 1908, a near sister to Schiller, has been moored as a floating restaurant since 1970.”  Click here for some interior photos, which give me an appetite to travel there some summer.

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Rich took these two photos of PS Stadt Luzern,  built 1928,  near Vitznau.  I had to look up that location.

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Click here and here for more info on Lake Lucerne.

Two things come to mind as I look at these.  First, of course there were bowsprite’s  too-short-liaison with steamships here, and then there were a few surviving US  steam yachts I saw at Mystic Seaport here.

Many thanks to Rich for these photos.

I took this photo back in 2008, and it seemed I never got back to it.  At the time, I didn’t realize it was built in 1904 and had once done the Buffalo–Duluth passenger run with first-class staterooms.  Buffalo–Duluth passenger ferry  SS Juniata . . . doesn’t even seem reasonable a century later.

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Between 1937 and 1941, she was thoroughly upgraded and  “returned to work  as the Milwaukee Clipper and carried passengers and their cars between Muskegon and Milwaukee until 1970 when the interstate highways and air travel rendered her obsolete.”    I’m told volunteers are working to preserve her.  I’d love to hear a progress report.

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In contrast, the rest of the photos I took on the Arthur Kill in 2010, and what you see here is no longer there.  I’m going out on a limb here, and guessing it’s the Astoria aka William T. Collins, built in 1925 and out of documentation in 1966.

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I recall reading that it was removed –as an eyesore–since then, but can’t find any newspaper record of such.  Anyone help out?   My co-explorer here is none other than frogma . . . .

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Click here for a post I did on a re-purposed 1929 NYC ferry still operational as a double-ended construction vessel,  click here for a post I did on a NYC-NJ ferry that operated as such between 1905 and 1970 before being repurposed as a restaurant until neglect and a certain Irene came along, and here for a post on what might be the oldest in service ferry in the US.

Below is P/S Majesteit, a 1926 steam ferry still operating in Rotterdam as a floating restaurant steam side paddle wheeler;

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here’s their site with photos of the steam machinery.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I did two posts on Badgerhere and here–back in 2012.  But until these photos this week, which I’m using with permission from FB’s SS Badger: Lake Michigan Car Ferry, I’d never seen her underwater ship lines.

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Above, that’s a ice-reinforced hull.  Read about her dry dock visit here.

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As I write, she’s in dry dock for a few more days at Bay Shipbuilding in Sturgeon Bay, WI.

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Here are some photos I took back in 2012 as she was departing Ludington MI for Manitowoc WI.

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Yes, she burns coal to this day, (one of) the last vessel (s) fueled by coal in the US.  For a good summary of her old and current technology, click here.  To see what goes on in her engine room, click here.

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When she entered service in the 1950s, she was designed primarily to transport railcars across the Lake.  Click here to read a story on the vessel published in Professional Mariner about two years ago.

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The next two photos are NOT of Badger but rather her twin, Spartan.  By the way, the badger is the mascot of University of Wisconsin and the spartan . . . of Michigan State University.   There was a double christening in September 1952,  but since 1979, Spartan has been laid up at the dock in Ludington.

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I hope to ride the Badger, 60 water miles of an almost 600-mile US Route 10,  again this coming summer.

Many thanks to SS Badger for use of the first four photos, taken this past month;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

And to close this with a digression, here’s a one-of-a-kind I saw displayed at the dock in Manitowoc when I was there.

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If you ever visit anywhere near Savannah, an absolute must-see is the Ships of the Sea Museum in the former William Scarbrough House, later the West Broad Street School. Given that the house and collection are stunning and the staff extraordinarily welcoming, it didn’t surprise me how crowded the museum was.

Excuse the quality of my photos taken sans tripod, but let’s start with this model of a vessel that has a connection with New York City.  Answer follows, but clues for now are that the vessel was built as the Denton in 1864 and you might know the whitish horizontal object to the left of the display case .  . .  in front of the bow of the model.

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The SSM models are quite large, and many of them are the handiwork of William E. Hitchcock.

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SS Savannah, e.g., is a great place to begin your tour and appreciate Hitchcock’s handiwork.  This vessel–the first steamship to cross the Atlantic--was built on the land’s edge the sixth boro.

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Notice the port side of Hitchcock’s model shows the paddlewheel, but

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the starboard side features a cutaway to the boiers and the paddlewheel collapsed as it would be while the vessel sailed, which was most of the time.

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Another of Hitchcock’s models shows a 220′ schooner as she appeared under construction.

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Notice that Forest City‘s demise–as was SS Savannah’s–happened on Fire Island.

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The SSM collection also includes a Hitchcock model of USS Passaic, another product of the sixth boro–Greenpoint–although many sources, including this one from wikipedia, state its shipyard as being Greenport, 120+ miles away.  Greenpoint’s Continental Iron Works also built Monitor, launched the same year as Passaic.

Back to the model at the top.  The vessel Denton had been renamed SS Dessoug when it delivered Cleopatra’s Needle to NYC.

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This and much more awaits you at Ships of the Sea Museum.  Thanks to Jed for suggesting–half a decade ago–that I go there.

These photos–warts and all-by Will Van Dorp.

 

I borrow this title from an event I’d love to see more photos of, an art trip marking National Maritime Day in May 1987 and reported on here and here.  What better way to leap into the future with blasts from the past, borrowing again.

My purpose in this post is to inform about a unique celebratory event at the Pratt campus in Brooklyn that will not be repeated after this week, Wednesday December 31 late into January 1 wee . . .  Here are the directions:  “There will be two gates open, one on the corner of Dekalb and Hall Street; the other is the main vehicle gate on Grand and Willoughby Aves.  Grand Ave does probably not show on maps because  there are super blocks on each side of Willoughby.  Once on the campus head for the smokestack or follow the noise to the calliope.   Closest subway stop is Washington\Clinton on the G train.  Get out at the Washington end of the station.  One block along  Lafayette ,  turn left around the church.  One block down Hall Street you will see Pratt Institute.”

Here and here are previous posts I’ve done on the whistles Conrad Milster has at Pratt.

Here are some of my photos of steam whistles, my tribute to steam . . .

aboard Belle of Louisville,

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at the Pageant of Steam,

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and all the rest at the Stoom fest near Rotterdam this past May.   Like the 1930 steam tug Roek.

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Or the 1933 British Navy torpedo recovery vessel Elfin.

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Yes, that’s a child playing on the torpedo.

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Or the 1893 Pieter Boele .  . . a steam tug with a bowsprit.

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Or the 1915 Hercules.

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Dress warm and come bathe in the sound and steam hooked up by Conrad Milster at Pratt.  I’ll see you there.

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All Most photos by Will Van Dorp.  The photo above is by the inimitable bowsprite, who captured steam and cold water rituals here 4 years ago.

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I hoped to ride Elbe to Maassluis, but due to my misread of the waterbus schedule, we were JUST too late . .  and watched from the quay.  For two short movies of Elbe leaving the dock, check my Facebook page.

 

You may recall previous posts here and here about these machines called “alligators” or warping tugs, flat bellied vessels used in timbering a century ago that could pull themselves across short stretches of land between bodies of water.    These photos were sent to me by Steven Smith who owns a camp near where the photos of wreckage in the second link above were taken.  The images that follow likely show that same tug in its prime.  Steve writes that in the early 1920s, the tug was “shipped on a flatbed railroad car to the RR station at Bemis, Maine, next to Mooselucmeguntic lake – it steamed over to Upper Dam, over the carry to Richardson Lake then to Middle Dam and then down the Carry road to its home on Pond in the River all under its own power .”  Notice the name Roebling on the spool of cable.  Alligator worked on the lakes from 1923 until about 1953.

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In this close-up, notice the levers and U-joints employed to raise the props and shafts during land transits.

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The next two photos below show while the Alligator was in transit from the Bemis RR station to Pond in the River:  two lakes and two transits on dry land to get to Pond in the River

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Thanks much to Steve Smith for sending along these photos.  Credit for the top four photos goes to Brown Company Collection, Michael Spinelli, Jr. Center for University Archives and Special Collections, Herber H. Lamson library and Learning Commons, Plymouth State University, and that’s in Plymouth, NH.

And the timing . . . check out this story about the annual celebration of alligators  below NYC . .  maybe connecting the various parts of the sixth boro.

Taken over in Newark Bay . .  a shrink-wrapped airplane on a barge . .  foto compliments of the team over at Henry Marine.  I did this post in April 2013, but you should befriend them on Facebook at Tug Life at Henry Marine for a different take on working in the sixth boro.  Anyone know where this airplane has gone/is going?  Two of several previous posts with airplanes on barges are here and here.

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Over in Tottenville, it’s Bertha and the Outerbridge beyond that.  Thanks to Ashley for this foto.  Previously, Ashley sent along this foto.

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Up near the Thousand Islands and the Canadian border, it’s Bowditch, foto compliments of Bob Stopper.  Bowditch dates from 1954 and used to be called Hot Dog.  More of Bob’s fotos from upstate NY and other places soon.

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Taken on Penobscot Bay, it’s Cangarda, thanks to Allan Seymour.  He and Sally do the Sally W blog.

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The next two–showing fish tugs–were taken by my sister on Lake Huron in August.  Previously I did posts about fish tugs here, here, and here.   Here‘s another series on Nancy K.   See more L & R here.

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And last but not least, taken off New London during its schooner fest, it’s Malabar II, a 91-year-old vessel of John Alden design.  Fotos of this timeless vessel come compliments of Rod Clingman.

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Mant thanks to Rod, Allan, Bob, Maraki, and –last but not least–the crew at Henry Marine for permission to use these fotos.

Now some info on other people’s events:

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Working Harbor Committee Circumnavigation of Staten Island

Bring Harvest dome to Gowanus

and last but certainly not least . . .  that’s a tugster foto below.  Click here for details.

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