You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Seth Tane’ tag.

I believe I took this in summer 2005, my first view of Lincoln Sea from W. O. Decker.  Lincoln Sea is now making its way northward probably along Baja California, if not already along alta California.

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A few days ago and from the crew of Maraki–aka my sister and brother-in-law–it’s Salvatore in Santa Marta, Colombia.

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And in the same port . . . Atlantico assisting Mosel Ace into the dock.

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From Seth Tane . . . Alaska Mariner in Portland on the Columbia . . . river, that is.

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And the next few from Fred Trooster and Jan Oosterboer and taken in Amazonehaven section of the port of Rotterdam less than a week ago . . . the giant Thalassa Elpida assisted into the dock by FairPlay 21.  The two smaller boats are the line handlers.

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Click here for a post I did four years ago showing FairPlay 21 nearly capsizing.

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Tailing the giant is Smit Ebro.

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Rounding today out . . . it’s W. O. Decker, Viking, and Cheyenne . . . before the tugboat race in September 2010.

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Thanks to Fred, Seth, and Maraki for these photos.

. . . comes from the same source as Relief Crew 17, Seth Tane, whose most recent work is called Sea Train.  Back in the summer of 2014, Blue Marlin brought in a dry dock named Vigorous–the largest in the US.  It came on the back of Blue Marlin from ZPMC.  That dry dock is now working, and below you see its current load, USNS T-AH-19 Mercy.  Yes, mercy!!  Here are some previous iterations of Mercy.

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Photo by Seth Tane, although I tinkered with it a bit.

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More Mercy here.

Click here (and scroll) to see sister hospital vessel Comfort in a post I did five years ago.

 

Spirit of America . . . operates as an icon among icons.

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I need to force myself to look hard to see the obvious differences between Spirit and S. I. Newhouse, and others.

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Recently, though, Spirit has intruded into my photos more than any other one of the ferries.

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Molinari . . .

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John F. Kennedy and Spirit . . .

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Either Newhouse or Barberi . . .

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Positively identified as Newhouse.

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And this is the old terminal, actually called Battery Maritime Building and unofficially the Governors Island ferry terminal today.  And how’s the progress on its roof?  What’s going on there?  Read all about it here and here. Glass boxes seem currently in vogue in NYC.

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Click on the image below to see Battery Maritime Building and more of the sixth boro almost a century ago.

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For info on all the classes of Staten Island ferries, present and past, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, except the nighttime photo by Seth Tane.

And finally . . .  here’s a bowsprite image used in a marinelink.com article without credit!  And by bowsprite’s report, she’s received no response from marine link.com when she’s contacted them about . . . crediting her art.  Hmmmm…  See her original published image from four years earlier here.

 

 

aka Blue Marlin‘s Vigorous cargo, with all photos and most text by Seth Tane, whose painting site has long been linked to this blog AND who took the photos of the sixth boro during the 1970s and ’80s that he and I collaborated on last year in the 10-post series I called “sixth boro fifth dimension.”  By the way, the dry dock will be the largest in the US, built by ZPMC.  Do you recall hearing of them here and in other posts like here and here?

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 On the bow, Foss’ Pacific Escort.  On port, Tiger 9.  The view is from the St. John’s Bridge.

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On the stern is Shaver’s Sommer S.   That’s the city of Portland upper left.

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Ahead is the BNSF drawspan. They’re going to crane lift a few bits and pieces at the Vigor Swan Island shipyard (Click here for photos I took there last year.) and then transit back under the bridges to a deep hole off terminal 4 to float off the dock where they have the required 50′ draft.

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Here’s the side view.  Recall that it was Blue Marlin that returned a damaged USS Cole from Yemeni waters.

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Many thanks to Seth Tane for these photos.  Click here for another look at his painting.

 

Hawsepiper Paul is writing about this subject all along, as you might expect since he lives most of his days on a bunker barge.

Indulge me a bit as I elaborate on these adventures, as captured in photos by Tony A, starting with this one. When does a New York port of registry seem out of place?

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I’d say when it’s painted onto a vessel never or rarely seen in New York, and of course I know that with flags of convenience . . . anything is possible with arcane finagling.

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To appear to digress a little bit more, Marcus G Langseth is to 2014 as Robert G Conrad was to –say– 1980.  Conrad is a photo I copied from Seth Tane‘s archives a little over a year ago when I did the “fifth dimension” series on the sixth boro.

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Langseth is currently working off Atlantic City, one of its nearer peregrinations.

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Anyhow, about two weeks ago Tony A and Patrick Sky got to deliver fuel to this international wanderer.

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A little over an hour later, Patrick Sky, feeling much lighter, pulls away from this dock underneath Throgs Neck  (which autocorrect insists should be spelled “throb’s neck,” but that would take us into adventures in spell auto correcting, which I’d much rather avoid.

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Many thanks to Tony A and to Seth Tane for use of these photos.   Happy scientific gallivanting for LDEO, Marcus G Langseth named for this Tennessee-born earth scientist.

 

Here was 16, and I’m asking again my questions about the last foto in that post . . . .

So here is this installment’s odds and ends.  First . . . in the second minute of Woody Allen’s 1979 movie Manhattan . . . there’s this clip.  Can anyone identify?

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And . . . a foto taken not quite a thousand nautical miles from the sixth boro quite a while ago by a jaunty mariner who can’t be too careful . . . it’s LT-805 General Winfield Scott towing the IX-514 that later turned up in the sixth boro.  I’ve no idea if the HLT towed here remains local as of this writing.

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And finally . . . another set from Seth Tane taken in New York harbor in the late 1970s/early 80s . . . it’s Harwich-built 1890s Thames sailing barge Ethel, 84′ loa.  According to former owner Capt. Neal E. Parker, the vessel, built originally as a linseed carrier and brought across the Atlantic for the 1967 World’s Fair in Montreal, was haunted.   “She was fighting to die,” he said, and after an unsuccessful attempt as a charter vessel in downeast Maine, she returned to New London, where around 1992, she sank at the dock and waited happily to be dismembered and removed by a clamshell crane.

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I’d love to hear more about Ethel from anyone who saw her back 30 years ago.

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Oh . .  and that tugboat from the Woody Allen film . . . it’s A. J. McAllister, I believe.  Click here and here for previous film tug posts.

Thanks to Seth and the jaunty mariner for use of their fotos.

Here was the first in this series.  The next five fotos are more of the set from the late 1970s/early 1980s from Seth Tane that I featured in the “fifth dimension” posts earlier this year.

I’d love to find more fotos like this, illustrating a line I’ve heard repeatedly, as variation on  . . . “NYC used to have huge pier fires.”  The smoke here might be wafting over from a NJ pier fires.  I’d also like to hear more about the general perception of piers at that time.

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My take is that emphasis in fighting the fires was on containing them, ensuring that they didn’t spread inland.  Piers, aka covered short term warehouses, were transitioning into oblivion or another life as  containerization began to supplant break bulk cargo and moved out of these areas of the sixth boro and airplanes supplanted ocean liners.  Pier maintenance slipped and fires of a range of causes  broke out.

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I’ve heard people say . . .  fires burned for weeks.

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Demolition reigned.

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(I’ve used this foto before.) In some cases . . . in NYC and elsewhere . . . retail areas were built.

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The rest of these fotos are from September 2013.  Retail buildings,  parks and residences, businesses sprang up and continue to.  And one of those places, Pier 17 on the East River side of Manhattan is transitioning again.  Bravo to the Demanes for holding out, as Howard Hughes promises to “re-energize” the area.

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Pier 57 on the Hudson River side is the venue for a similar makeover.  What was just a plan a few months back is happening now.

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Here’s the interior of Pier 57 a few days ago.

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You might recall the Nomadic Museum not far from here . . . nine years ago already.

OK, this is a wandering post.  Partly, I wanted to tell a story I heard last week from someone who fought these pier fires thirty years ago.   He related that one aspect of fighting these fires was removing “fuel.”  In some cases what would burn in these long-smoldering blazes was cargo, which would be pushed into the river.  His example was clothing, mens’ dress shirts.  Into the river whole skids of them would go.   And then, as soon as was possible,  many would be fished out . . . because to let them sink would just add to the pollution in the harbor and be wasteful.  I don’t know how common this would be, and I know nothing of the attitude of the merchandise owners or insurers  . . .  The piers were then a very different world.

Thanks to Seth for sharing these fotos.  My apologies if I’ve rendered any story inaccurately.  I’d love to see more of this type of foto and hear more stories.

This NYPD officer of the peace got tugged right into a recent parade.  When that happens, you know all things could get downright disorderly.

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This last June post is a melange of Pegasus and Lehigh Valley 79 in a setting rays irritating my camera,

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Patuxent in the Philly dawn,

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Sea Hawk approaching the St. John’s Bridge,

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Patuxent redux,

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Natoma docked in the Columbia,

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Caspian Sea in the Delaware,

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Surrie Moran in the same waters,

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Aries in Portland,

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Madeline,

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Black Hawk,

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more Black Hawk, 

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Cape Henry,

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again Madeline,

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and finally Lewiston.

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Rounding things out, it’s Siberian Sea in palm trees country aka the sixth boro, taken about a year ago.  I will resume the blog as soon as I can in a land with more palm trees

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Thanks for reading the blog and sending comments either here or via email.  Sorry if I haven’t acknowledged everyone who’s sent along a tidbit or nice word.

If you’ve never taken a Working Harbor tour in NYC’s sixth boro, here’s info.  If you  know the sixth boro pretty well–especially the contemporary commercial aspects of it, you might even propose to them to narrate a tour.  That’s just me suggesting that, but there are folks who want to better understand the role of shipping and its interaction between the sixth boro and the five terrestrial ones.

Thanks to Seth Tane for the fotos of Aries, Black Hawk, Lewiston, Nahoma, and Sea Hawk.  All others by Will Van Dorp who hopes to next post from the obscure January River.

Guess this tug?  This and alternate fotos here are taken by Seth Tane.  Answer follows.

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Joan Turecamo (1980 and one of the last tugs built at Matton in Cohoes)in the foreground.  Guess the one in the distance?

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Natoma . .  1976.

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Vessel in the distance earlier was Susan Miller, 1981.  I’m guessing the barge is loaded with riprap for shoreline protection somewhere in Raritan Bay.  I wonder about the origin of those rockaceous chunks.

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Craig Foss was launched in June 1945 as LT-648 by Tampa Marine, one of over 700 tugs operated by the US Army at the end of WW II.  For a foto of a Tampa hull, click here.

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Peering over crane barge Delaware Bay, it’s Caitlin Ann, 1961.

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It’s Shaver’s 1981-built Portland.  For a foto of a 1947 ship-assist tug Portland, click here.

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And finally . .  a tug with a tent passing a clock with no hands, it’s Miriam Moran (1979).

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Top foto is Amnav’s Revolution at the Rainier Foss shipyard in 2006.

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Foto #1.  Seth Tane took this from the WTC in the early 1980s.  From L to R, that’s the Statue, Ellis Island, and Communipaw Terminal of CRRNJ . . . with a lot of vacant space behind.  NOT shown but just to the right would be the Morris Canal and the Colgate Clock.

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Foto #2.  I took this grainy foto from the WTC in late December 2000.  NOT shown but just to the left is the CRRNJ terminal.   Notice the Morris Canal and the first set of high rise condos of Jersey City.  Anyone know the name?  Also notice that Goldman Sachs is not there yet.

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Foto #3.  Beyond QE2 leaving the sixth boro for the last time in October 2007, you see the CRRNJ terminal, Morris Canal, Colgate clock, and the Goldman Sachs with additional buildings to the right.   Foto taken by amica.

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Foto #4.  I took this foto in September 2009 from North Cove.

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Fotos  #5 and 6.  Amica took these in 2010 and 2011.

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Foto #7.  I took tis one last week from just north of North Cove, 18 floors up.

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Click here for some great views of Jersey City, mostly Morris Canal area, mostly in the early 80s.   Here for aerial shots emphasizing rail.

Click here for lots more . . . dating way back.

To reiterate what I said in part 9 of this series, the margins of the sixth boro have experienced a sea change from 30 years ago to now.  And stormy Sandy of seven months ago intimates that all this relatively rapid building on reclaimed land at sea level will again change.  But the difference is that since humans have walked and waded and floated here, we’ve never had construction of this scale.

Foto #8.  Shifting focus a bit, Seth took this shot of–I believe–South or North Cove from the same vantage at the same time as foto #1.

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Click here for images of the same, but from the mid 70s.  And still more here looking across what was then the plains of Battery Park City.   And the last one for now crediting Nelson Rockefeller for the concept.

As I did before, I’m inviting a sharing of more fotos showing the tremendous changes on the edge of the sixth boro.

Afterthought . . . if you want to witness further changes to the sixth boro margins, be in a viewing location that’ll show this building between 0700 and 0800 tomorrow morning.  The structure below might just implode . . .

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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