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In July 2010, the 1968 Black Hawk was one of two sister tugs operated by Sound Freight Lines.  Since then, the sister Seminole has been sold foreign, and Black Hawk has been sold to Sause Brothers Ocean Towing.  Sause refurbished her and for an account of Black Hawk towing a barge from San Francisco to Vancouver, click here. Details on Black Hawk are 112′ x 34′ and 3700 hp.

Chief, 1999, is/was one of Crowley’s Harbor class tugs.  She’s 97′ x 36′ and 4800 hp.

James T. Quigg is no doubt now wearing Centerline Logistics colors.  She dates from 1971 and measures in at 98′ x 30′ and 3000 hp.   Since launch, she’s worked the US East Coast, once called Fournier Boys,  and Hawaii, as well as the West Coast.

Alaska Titan came off the ways in 2008.  She’s one of a half dozen “titans” operated by Western Towboat.

Currently following the waterway through the islands of the Alaska panhandle, she measures in at 112′ x 35′ and 5000 hp.

Westrac, 1987, is another Western Towboat vessel, measuring in at 63′ x 28′ and 2500 hp.

This Triton, launched 1965, now goes by Wycliffe.  She’s 115′ x 31′ and 2500 hp.   She’s currently in Ensenada MX.

Dixie, 1951, has a history in towing log rafts on the Columbia River hundreds of miles above Portland OR. She’s 46′ x 15′ and 575 hp.

Pacific Star, launched 2008, now goes by Signet Courageous.  She’s 92′ x 40′ and 6610 hp. She’s currently in the Gulf of Mexico off Corpus Christi.

On Lake Washington, Lady Washington and Hawaiian Chieftain were out sailing.  The two vessels are now outside the Puget Sound in Gray’s Harbor, and Hawaiian Chieftain, as I understand it, has been “laid up.”  The two replica vessels have a waterline length of 72’and 62′, respectively.

Island Packer puzzles me a bit.  It seems not be cost effective to operate the 1943 converted landing craft between here and the Aleutians, where Chernofsky is located.  I suppose it was in Seattle that day for service.  I don’t know.

Katie Ann, launched in Baltimore in 1969, almost 300′ loa and powered by 8000 hp,  is one of six processing/packing/freezing vessels operated by American Seafoods.  She operates with a crew of 75.  As of this writing, according to AIS, she’s in exactly the same location I photographed her in July 2010, but only because she’s between seasons.

Viking has the lines of a converted oiler, like these.  She could be the 120′ crabber/trawler built for crabbing/fishing by Marco in 1975.

All photos, WVD, in July 2010.

 

 

Garth Foss, launched in 1993, is huge: 138′ x 46′ with 8000 hp and 80 tonnes of bollard pull.  Robert Allan says of Garth and sister Lindsey, ““They were really the first true purpose-designed tanker escort tugs in the world.”

Pacific Pride, launched in 1976 and measuring 84′ x 28′ and 2500 hp, is now Panama-registered D Dog.  She’s currently anchored off Callao Peru.

Next to her is Sirius, launched in 1974,  126′ x 38′ and 5750 hp, and currently laid up in Hawaii.

Guardian was launched in 1970, measuring 136′ x 37′ and 5750 hp, and is laid up.   Gladiator dates from 1975, measures in at 129′ x 37′ and  7200 hp.    She’s now Vanuatu-registered Resolve Gladiator, currently in the Irish Sea.

Over in Bremerton, I saw YTB 828 aka Catahecassa   101′ x 31′.  She was launched in 1974 in Marinette WI.  One source says that In 2013, she was sold to Basic Towing and renamed Gina.  Basic does own YTB 827 Chetek now known as Nickelena. Of course, all of this could be out of date.

Western Ranger was launched in 1968 as Oio, a Hawaiian Pineapple, then Dole tugboat.  In 1992 she came to Western Tugboat.  She’s  101′ x 31′ and rated at 3420 hp.  As of now, she’s on a run from Nome to Dutch Harbor.

Flyer was built in 1981.  She’s all of 37′ x 16′ and 400 hp.  Hornet was built in 1966 and the tape says 42′ x 14′ and 360 hp.

Pathfinder was launched in 1970, 136′ x 37′ and 5750 hp.     Now she goes by Island Explorer and is off BC on a run from Seattle to Anchorage.

Valor was launched in 2007 and chartered to Crowley.  She’s  93′ x 40′ and 6772 hp.  Currently she’s in San Francisco Bay.

Andrew Foss was launched in 1982 as Andrew Foss, measuring in at 107′ x 38′ and 4290 hp.

The trip to the Seattle area in July 2010 produced lots of photos I posted here.  Maybe I should get updates on more of the boats I saw there.  I was invited to be there in August 2020 for a wedding, but like so many things . . . that’s not happening.

All photos, WVD.

You saw Lauren Foss in yesterday’s post here.  Here’s a followup, from sixth boro interiors I don’t get to much.  Richie Ryden writes:  “Look who showed up on the Hackensack River in Kearny NJ:   Lauren Foss with the barge American Trader in tow with the new deck for the Wittpenn Bridge. The bridge deck was built in  Vancouver, Washington  shipped through the Panama Canal to NJ.”

If I read the AIS info correctly when I first saw Lauren off Sandy Hook, that voyage took about a month and a week.

 

And thanks to Joseph Chomicz, here’s more of that area, photo taken just upstream of the others.  Joseph writes:  “Lauren Foss was destined for the Hackensack River.  She brought in the lift span of the new Route 7 lift bridge they are building.  Also Donjon is [nearby] in the process of moving coal out of the power plant on the Hackensack River as well.   [I could count] four Donjon tugs in the photo below:  Meagan Anne, Thomas D, Emily Ann, and Sarah Ann.”

From a decade ago, here’s a post I did about the Hackensack River, including a photo of a barge delivering that coal to the plant.  The deliveries used to be made by ExpressMarine equipment. 

Thanks to Richie and Joe for these photos.

For you not familiar with the area, the green line below represents rough approximation of the track Lauren Foss followed in and

the red circle, the location of the Wittpenn Bridge.

For more of the story–on four more bridge section deliveries–click here.

 

 

 

As I went to one of my locations Thursday, I saw this tow headed up the Upper Bay toward Bayonne, and lamented being too late.  I knew it was one of the new DSNY garbage cranes recently being deployed to new marine transfer stations in Manhattan & SW Brooklyn…

Panning slightly to the right, a group on Miller’s Launch boats were attending Afrodite . . .

Panning more than 90 degrees over past the VZ Bridge, I noticed a crane and some tugs over in the direction of Coney Island . . .

Shortly thereafter, I realized the sanitation cranes were returning . . . outbound, moved by Catherine C. Miller.

The next day, from the same vantage point, I noticed two large tugs in Gravesend Bay, one less familiar than the Moran tug.

The unusual stacks identified it immediately . . . Lauren Foss, which I had not seen since 2014, three and a half years ago here….  By the way, notice the ferris wheel and roller coaster on the skyline of Coney Island?

If you’re new to reading this blog, the high point of summer in the sixth boro shoreside for me is the first day, because it brings the mermaids ashore, a whole series of posts about which you can find here . . .

But back to Lauren Foss, a large oceangoing tug used for large barges.  RORO barge American Trader , 400′ x 105′ qualifies as a large barge, although some of the Crowley container barges are larger as seen here and here.

Click here for the specs on the 8200 hp Lauren Foss.

CCA . . . here’s info on this busy but mostly invisible corporation that dates back to the Reagan era.

Here’s the scoop on McLaren Engineering.

 

The sixth boro is truly the part of NYC that never sleeps.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

The last leg for now goes from Newport to Warren RI, but given the favorable wind before the torrent, let’s watch those contemporaries who play in this N-Bay city with such a long colonial and post-colonial history.

I’m quite unschooled about these speedsters, like the one showing her red belly.  A 12-meter, I suppose?

Northbound past Beavertail Light?

 

Madeleine heads out to play.

This racer is sponsored by the Danish wind energy company, quite appropriately, as I would hardly expect an ExxonMobil sponsored wind boat, although petroleum energy companies have started investing heavily in renewables . . . so someday soon there might be an Exxon sail racer.   Here’s BP’s portfolio.

 

Aurora has been featured here almost two year ago.

Marilee (1926)  is a classic, as is Pam (1921), once a whiskey runner.

Just as the wind boats use moving air currents to speed, this red tail benefitted from it to hover over a snake, which he eventually dropped, caught, and hauled off behind the tree line . . .

This is not a great photo, but Wallace Foss (1897!!) can be yours for a mere $165,000.  Those winds eventually brought lots of rain, which we

saw as we did the last short step . . . Newport to Warren.

I’d love to have seen NOAA’s Gunter and Bigelow closer up . . .

Gracie M. Reinauer (2016) waited for more favorable offshore weather before heading to the sixth boro.

And finally, after over a 1000 miles on our itinerary, we return to home base, where Niagara Prince welcomes us back.  So does anyone have photos to share of Niagara Prince in the Champlain Canal, the western Erie, Chicago Sanitary Canal, or any other inland waterway where scale make her look immense?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  For a similar focus on sailing vessels associated with a specific water mass, click here for photos from the Great ! Chesapeake Schooner race.

And if you’ve not caught the connection of this journey to Albert Gallatin (a US founding father), click here.

For GHP&W 10, let’s gallivant over to the West Coast and look at some photos there by Glen, who moved to the Columbia watershed after a long career working on sixth boro waterways.

Let’s start out with Shaver’s Washington.  Notice anything unusual about this photo?  Answer at the end of the post.

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And some more starting with Kirby’s Sirius,

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Tidewater,

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Shaver’s Umatilla and Foss’ Howard Olsen,

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Shaver’s Deschutes,

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Portland,

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Vancouver,

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P. J. Brix, and

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and Bernert’s Diane B.

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And in that first photo, Washington travels on the river any way forward she pleases.

Many thanks to Glen  for these photos.

 

aka Blue Marlin‘s Vigorous cargo, with all photos and most text by Seth Tane, whose painting site has long been linked to this blog AND who took the photos of the sixth boro during the 1970s and ’80s that he and I collaborated on last year in the 10-post series I called “sixth boro fifth dimension.”  By the way, the dry dock will be the largest in the US, built by ZPMC.  Do you recall hearing of them here and in other posts like here and here?

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 On the bow, Foss’ Pacific Escort.  On port, Tiger 9.  The view is from the St. John’s Bridge.

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On the stern is Shaver’s Sommer S.   That’s the city of Portland upper left.

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Ahead is the BNSF drawspan. They’re going to crane lift a few bits and pieces at the Vigor Swan Island shipyard (Click here for photos I took there last year.) and then transit back under the bridges to a deep hole off terminal 4 to float off the dock where they have the required 50′ draft.

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Here’s the side view.  Recall that it was Blue Marlin that returned a damaged USS Cole from Yemeni waters.

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Many thanks to Seth Tane for these photos.  Click here for another look at his painting.

 

Here was 17.

All the photos in this post come from south of latitude 26 N.  You might recall the Foss tugs Lauren and Iver  delivering the crane to the sixth boro at the end of last month?  Then Lauren Foss traveled to Philly to pick up back haul?  Well about two days ago, Lauren delivered that payload–Forrestal–to the scrapyard in Brownsville, TX.  The ship in the distance to the left is SS Mount Washington, also a recent arrival here, and subject of a several recent pictures on tugster.   The photo below shows the stern of Lauren Foss with assist tug Signet Ranger on port bow of the old carrier.   The next three photos all come from Justin Earl, on paper . ..  chief mate of Lauren.

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Another shot of Signet Ranger and at stern, Signet Magic.  For specs of Signet tugs, click here.

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On starboard bow here is Signet Courageous.

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The next photos, again south of latitude 26 come from my gallivanting sister.  Guess the port?  Butterfly has been spotted in the sixth boro here and here.

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I’ve no identification of the two vessels in the foreground.

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Anyone help?

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Oh . ..  the port is Clifton Point in the Bahamas.

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The blue and white tug to the left is Tiki, but again I have no further info.

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And finally . . . Sea Trader.  Click here for a closer up photo.

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Many thanks to Justin and Maraki for use of these photos.

Signet tugs previously appeared here and here.

Field test for a new digital camouflage pattern?

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Actually it’s this, CVA-59 . . . decommissioned for over 20 years and now moving

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south and then west.  Justin Earl gave permission to use the photo below.  For more pics of the move out of Philly, click here.

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Dave Boone took the rest of these.  Here, the tow approaches the Chester waterfront.

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Assisting here–as they approach Fox Point–a great place to see river traffic–are (I believe) Alex McAllister, Timothy, and Bridget.

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Check out this 12-minute video on her construction.  It makes an appropriate start to an epitaph for this vessel.

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Fair weather, Lauren.

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Many thanks to Justin Earl and Dave Boone for use of these photos.  Justin’s chief mate on Lauren and has been on board since Panama. I took the top two photos back in June 2010.  It’s hard to believe that Lauren, Iver and the crane coming through the Narrows was less than a week ago!

Slight digressions:  here are my latest photos of Timothy from more than six months ago.  And here’s a post I did over a year ago with shots from Fox Point.

Many thanks to Bjoern Kils of nymediaboat.com for use of this foto.  Check out Bjoern’s website here.

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And many thanks to Phil Little for the rest of these shots.  I’m certain Phil won’t object to sharing the text that accompanied these fotos, as it too captures the moment:

“I went to the viewing site today at 8:30 am, and saw the tow pass under the VN Bridge at about 9:00. I checked in with the Thruway person, and had no trouble with acceptance of my Tugster credentials (my honest face!)  The Lauren Foss stopped out in the middle of the bay to drop the wire, and two other tugs took it “on the hip”, arranged along its (boom facing aft) port side, the Weeks Elizabeth at the front and an iced-up unknown tug (Iver Foss?)at the after end position. Lauren Foss stood by like an anxious parent.  It was awesome to see these tugs then guide the Lifter in toward the Cruise Ship dock, and turn it with precision into the near-shore channel, proceeding northwest toward the Weeks yard. It glided along in front of in front of us, not 100 feet away, aboard the royal barge, the mighty King of Cranes!  They swung into the final turn toward Weeks, against the backdrop of the new Freedom Tower and the Statue of Liberty. In the yard, waiting, it looked for all the world like a huge flock of red and white-necked herons were about to welcome this strange new powerful creature who would lead them in plucking prizes out of the Hudson!  What a show!”

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As of this writing, I believe the two Foss tugs are refueling, resupplying, and possibly re-crewing . . . in preparation to return to sea for the next job.

Bjoern and Phil . . . thanks much.

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