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This post is a direct follow-up to one I did a week ago, documenting the 270-nm trip from Kings Point NY to Norfolk aboard USMMA Sailing Foundation vessel Tortuga.  This post documents the second and final leg of the trip to Tortuga‘s winter berth in New Bern NC, a 179-nm trip from Norfolk.

Let’s start here.  Departure time on day 1 is 1100 h. If you think the navy vessel in dry dock looks familiar, well . . . it visited the sixth boro in May 2012, and I toured the ship DDG 57 USS Mitscher at that time here.

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A USN presence is pervasive along the Elizabeth river portion of the ICW, but the Norfolk Naval Ship is

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technically in Portsmouth. The vessel above is AS 41 USS McKee

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Click here and here for info on the Elizabeth River, technically a tidal estuary.  Click on the map below to get interactivity.

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Here McLean Contracting Co. tug Fort Macon works on the replacement of the Steel Bridge in Chesapeake VA.

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I was surprised to learn there’s a lock in the ICW, the Great Bridge Lock.  I was even more surprised to learn the USACE contracts the operation and maintenance of the lock to a company called US Facilities.

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I must read more about the ICW, but in WW2 it proved a safe route for commerce when enemy submarines preyed on vessels offshore.

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Paradise Creek pushes oil along the ICW today; when I started this blog,  it was a regular workhorse in the sixth boro of NYC.

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The color of ICW water is determined by natural tannins.

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The ICW is composed of wide open bays and sounds–which have narrow channels-as well as narrow cuts.   Here Evelyn Doris of the ICM fleet pushes a covered barge–soybeans, I’ll wager–northbound, possibly to Norfolk.

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Ahead is the US Rte 64 Bridge over the Alligator River, a swing bridge.

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Note the proximity of the photo above to the Atlantic Ocean.

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Tannins in the Alligator River water create this color.

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North Carolina today protects a lot of its coastal wetlands. Hunting is permitted, and in fact, VHF radio picked up a lot of communication with folks hunting in there.

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Parts of the ICW flow through cuts like the Alligator-Pungo Canal.

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This moment of arrival in Belhaven meant a lot to me, because just around the point in the center of the photo is the hospital where I was born. I hadn’t known it, but Belhaven also considers itself the birthplace of the ICW.

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Departure time on day 3 was 0600, Jupiter and Venus were higher in the sky than the rising sun.

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Aurora Mine looms over the Pamlico river. Potash export happens through Beaufort,  documented on tugster here and here a few years back.

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See the mine area on the south side of the Pamlico River below.

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Hunting abounds here.

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Note the spelling. 

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Belhaven used to support a fishing fleet.  I’ve no idea how the size of the fleet and market in Hobucken has fluctuated over the years.

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Day 3, early afternoon we depart the Neuse River for the Trent by passing through the Cunningham Drawbridge.

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Tortuga is docked here for winter.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Again many thanks to the USMMA Sailing Foundation for inviting me to crew in winter relocation for Tortuga.

Know Apra?  Actually I didn’t, so let’s make this about guessing the location.  All photos come from Kyle Stubbs, who has previously contributed these photos.  Most of the text here is also from Kyle, who took these photos in summer 2010.

The Ha. 62-76 is a World War II Japanese Type C Ko-hyoteki-class midget submarine.  It ran aground across the island from Apra.

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By now, clearly you can identify the body of big water. Taisei Maru No. 28  is a longline fishing vessel built at Takuma, Japan in 1991. She stopped for a port call at Apra Harbor presumably to take on supplies.

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Natsushima, a Japanese research vessel built by Kawasaki at Kobe in 1981 is operated by Nippon Marine Enterprises, Ltd.

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CSC Brave is a 2007-built chemical/product tanker.

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Goliath was built at Yokosuka, Japan in 1980 as Kinuura. Ready to guess?

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Super Shuttle is a compact container ship built in Germany in 1977 as Passat.  It is used to transport cargo between the islands.  Now here’s a clue;  it’s operated by Seabridge, Inc.  

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And here’s another big clue with Matson’s 2004 Philadelphia built Maunawili.

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Chamorro, now operated by Seabridge, Inc., was built by Halter at News Orleans in 1974 as Mister Bob for Jackson Marine Corporation. One of a large series of tugs, you’ve previously seen photos of her sisters Mister Darby, now Atlantic Salvor,and Mister Peter, now the blighted Barents Sea.

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USNS Vadm K. R. Wheeler, T-AG 5001, built by North American Shipbuilding at Larose, LA in 2007, is operated by the Navy as an “Offshore Petroleum Distribution System (OPDS),” designed to facilitate the transfer of fuel from tankers to onshore installations from up to 8 miles offshore. Alongside is her tender, the 160′ loa crew boat  Fast Tempo.

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And finally, it’s USS Pearl Harbor, LSD-52. 

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Apra is a deepwater port in Guam.

Again, many thanks to Kyle for sharing these photos.

This is GHP&W 9, and since this unexpected trip to new ports has materialized, here we are.  Passing through Thimble Shoals Channel looking toward the Delmarva peninsula . . . it’s hard to capture the expanse of this bridge/tunnel.  But once inside, vessels to behold through the sudden rain include

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a noisy LCAC,

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a historically-named fishing boat,

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a Stiletto,

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and a landing craft.  Is that a pelican-shaped drone flying escort?

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Although we passed through Hampton Roads, the rain grayed out any sign of shore, where I’d been ashore four years ago.  Gold Coast was pushing a covered barge with

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seagull lookouts.

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Spring Scenery left a lot to the imagination.

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But the fleet lining the Norfolk shore was fabulous starting with USNS Lewis B Puller,

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possibly about to get a push from Tracy Moran, and

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USNS Supply,

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and Robert E. Perry.

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And much more, but for this post, we stop here.  All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

The title is such a mouthful that I’ll soon reduce it to GHP&W. Although this blog began with photos and observations of mostly working vessels in the great harbor associated with New York City, the watery part of which I call the sixth boro, the blog followed a course suggested by these vessels to other GHP&Ws. And given then the global nature of water traffic, it seems logical to devote at least a month to other GHP&Ws.

I’ll kick off with this post about a port I’ll likely never visit, the former Aral Sea fishing port of Moynaq in Uzbekistan.  The photos come from Getty Images by Bjorn Holland and Kelly Cheng. Surprisingly maybe, I live in a neighborhood of NYC where Uzbek is the dominant language, which was part of my motivation to read a Tom Bissell book called Chasing the Sea:  Lost among the Ghosts of Empire in Central Asia.  I highly recommend it.

So here are some detail areas of a huge aerial photo print I saw the other day.  Can anyone point to detail that confirms a date?  My guess is somewhere in the 50s or 60s.   The first photo below shows the southeast point of Bayonne NJ.  The peninsula bisecting the top and bottom is MOTBY.  Governors Island is upper right and the Statue is upper left with the southern tip of Manhattan along the top.

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Below is a closer up of the lower right corner of the photo above, showing that tugboat, some barges, and two sets of  trucks  at the cement dock.

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Note the Statue and Ellis Island.  To the left of it is now Liberty State Park.  The Caven Point Pier crosses the center of the photo and the current Global Terminal is still waiting for fill.

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Below is the just capped landfill that is topped by the Bayonne Golf Club.   Lower left is quite the gunkhole with disintegrating watercraft I’d love to see a closeup of.

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Remember that all the B/W “photos” above are parts of the same aerial shot.

Let’s have a fun month with lots of GHP&Ws.  And not to be too prescriptive, I’d love photos from a variety of GHP&Ws in Asia and Africa, mostly lacking in my previous 2900+ posts.  Of course, here and here are a few posts I’ve done on African ports; here,  Asian; and here and here, South American.

While I’m asking for collaboration, I have a chance to replicate a trip on a major African river that I originally did in 1973-74;  what I seek is leads to a publication that might be interested in the story and photos. The trip is pricey, and if I can sell a tale with photos, I can offset some of the expense. Anyone have ideas or connections?

Here was part 1.  Thanks much for the comments.  My conclusion is that most but not all were taken at the 1986 centennial celebration of our lady of the harbor.    I am still seeking a photo of the canal tug Grand Erie, ex-USACE Chartiers, launched in 1951, at the event.

Barque Simón Bolívar it would be good to see her back in the sixth boro again.  At this point, she was less than a decade old.   This past summer, she called in various ports in the Caribbean.

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Any help here anyone?

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USS Iowa BB-61 served as the reviewing stand for the event.  Click here for scans of the day and here for video.  Can anyone identify the tug alongside the battleship starting at about 2:10?

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Barque Eagle of course.  Can anyone identify the tugs in this photo?

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It’s schooner Pioneer in the background.

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The red-hulled vessel at the foot of the tower .  . is that stick lighter Ollie, now rotting away in VerPlanck?  See the end of this post.   Anyone know the USCG tug?

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These look like the morning-after spent fireworks shells.  What did it say in front of “industry” here?  And here ends the photos supplied by Harry Thompson.

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And here, as a note that I should do a post soon about Ollie . . . is one of the photos I took of her in 2010.  I saw her earlier in 2015, and it’ was even sadder by five years than this one.  Anyone have good pics of Ollie in her day?

Thanks very much, Harry, for getting this show going.

Yes, I am a fan of the X-Files, and yes . . . submarines have appeared on this blog before, like this one in Coney Island Creek.  Or this one headed north in the Upper Bay.  Parts  of submarines have emerged on the blog like here and here.  There have been fleets awaiting disassembly like here.  But recently at a yard on the North Fork, I saw the object in the image below, which intrigued me.  Here are some pics and then after you’ve observed the evidence and drawn some conclusions, I’ll tell you what I’ve read.

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Views from port side and

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port bow.  Osprey nest is not part of the vessel.

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Views from port stern,

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even a bit farther astern,

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and starboard bow.  Note the tripod and bracket mounted forward.

So what do you think?  What is your version of this story?

Here’s Corey Kilgannon’s NYTimes story from eight years ago.   Halfway through Kathleen Edgecomb’s The Day article you get a different version of the real history of the vessel.   But by the time T. E. McMorrow writes this East Hampton Star article in August 2014, a whole new version of sub and owner have emerged.

Actually I don’t know the real story, and certainly have no clue of its future, since according to this BBC article, the court has blocked sale of the sub.  Here’s the location of the real USS Deep Quest.   Here’s a followup Emma Fitzsimmons’ article from the December 1, 2014 NYTimes. And according to this McMorrow follow-up of a few weeks ago, the sub owner is now in a federal facility, and the sub, even if it had never been so previously, is now federal property.

And the feds, they may put it up for sale.  Want a toy with a “deep sea” history?   Did anyone catch photos of it traversing the sixth boro back in 2007?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

 

“Really random” posts tend to be far-flung, so let’s start out with this photo by Jed, who has contributed many photos recently.   Then there’s JED, who has contributed photos starting from 2008.   The boat dates from 1975.

photo date 27 APRIL 2015

From Jan Oosterboer via Fred Trooster, here’s the 1955 tug Argus along with

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Orion (1961), and

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Sirius (1966).  It appears that Sirius–like Orion and Brendan Turecamo–also has a wheelhouse that can be raised.

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For the scale of the “tow” here, scroll down and

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behold–Thialf, with a combined lifting capacity of over 14,000 tons!!  Click here to see the view down from Thialf’s deck AND be sure to read the comments that follow.   Here are a few other heavy-lifters including Saipem 7000.

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Heading back to NYC but as  the South Street Seaport Museum area of the sixth boro of NYC  looked in 1985, from a secret salt, it’s the 1939 USCGC WYT-93, Raritan!  The two vessels around her are, of course 1885 schooner Pioneer and 1908 lightship Ambrose.  Click here for a list of specifics and missions on Raritan, but one of her operations was against M/V Sarah of Radio NewYork International.  M/V Sarah was eventually blown up for a movie stunt.

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And rounding this post out . . . from Elizabeth, in Alameda, it’s  the 1943 YT-181 Mazapeta.

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In the distance is T-AKR-1001 GTS Admiral W. M. Callaghan, an MSC RORO named for a significant USN officer.

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Credit for each of these photos is as attributed.  Thanks to you all.

This was the tip-off photo:  in the right light, the raised-metal lettering is clear.  I received this photo from I.Y. last September, but never got more of the hull going abaft the US.

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This one doesn’t show the lettering.

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Nor does this.

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So this past weekend, when I was in Greenport, I headed straight down to the water–aboard Glory, which I’ll talk more about tomorrow–and

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bow of ex-YG-33 later J. R. Nelson

although the light didn’t bring out more detail, the captain did.  It turns out that YGs were garbage lighters, and this one had a memorable engine, although I don’t know if it’s rusty remains are still submerged.  This YG was turned into a fish

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processing vessel that sank at the dock and became the focus of a lawsuit.

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Thanks to Ingrid Young for putting me on this search and sending the top three photos.  The last three photos I took from launch Glory.

Here’s the fleet arrival extravaganza from three years ago.  And here are installments 1  2 and 3 of the arrival of a special vessel of the LPD set.

I got my spot early, and had some surprises . . . like this medium endurance cutter heading OUT to meet the fleet.

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WMEC 905 Spencer

There were also these four yard patrol craft doing the same,

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Training vessels from Annapolis

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YP 705

and this tropical architecture (!!?) under the palm-tree grove over by Fort Wadsworth.  What’s going on?  It’s Cuba at the Narrows.  

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Just before 10 a.m. the fleet was in sight coming up the Ambrose.

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The YPs 704, 705, 707, and 708 led the fleet in,

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DDG-55 Stout the first larger vessel in,

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followed by DDG-52 Barry and

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foreground vessel is former WPB-82362 Point Brown, now  Lady B

LPD-17 San Antonio.

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Here’s a schedule of events for the public and the fleet this week.

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Enjoy your stay, all.

 

Here’s the index on previous second lives posts.  I use “second lives” for what land folk call “adaptive reuse.”  It strikes me that there may be more instances of repurposing re-design and -engineering on water than on land, but that’s may just be my opinion.

But first, I thought to call this “pre-boomed” to follow up on yesterday’s post and the wonderful backstory I got in email yesterday from William Lafferty, frequent contributor here.  Here also sent along the photo below, which shows Twin Tube in 1951, i.e., before I was born and I’m 63.

Twintube 1

Here’s part of what William wrote:  “It shows the Twintube just after it entered service in fall 1951.  Twintube was launched 28 August 1951, Captain Blount’s mother doing the honors, and built on Blount’s account.  He used it as a travelling “demonstrator” for his shipyard’s products (it was Blount’s hull number 6) but also used it to haul oysters.  Power plant originally was a rather rare 4-cylinder Harnischfeger 138-hp Diesel.  (Click here for a 1950 news article including a photo of a 6-cylinder marine diesel.)  Harnischfeger (the H in the mining equipment manufacturer P & H) had been set up in 1945 at Port Washington, Wisconsin, by P & H to exploit the workboat and yacht market.  P & H closed the division, then at Crystal Lake, Illinois, in 1963.  In spring 1952 Blount sold the vessel to the Staten Island Oil Company, who converted it to a tanker with a 40,000 gallon capacity in eight 5,000 gallon compartments within its “tubes.”  The rest is, as they say, history.”

By the way, reference to “Staten Island Oil Company” brings me back to one of my favorite articles by the late great Don Sutherland here.

Here’s the index for all my previous Blount posts.

All this repurposing leads me to the second half of this post.  A friend named Matt–former all-oceans sailor–is looking to write a serious history about Cross Sound Ferry vessel Cape Henlopen, ex- USS LST-510.  Note the 510 still carried on its starboard bow.  She was built in the great shipbuilding state of Indiana.

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Cape Henlopen preparing to depart Orient Point March 2014

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Here she passes Orient Point Lighthouse at the start of its 80-minute ride over to New London.

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Matt is interested in interviewing past and present crew and seeing old photos of the vessel in any of its previous lives:   Cape Henlopen, MV Virginia Beach, USS Buncombe County, or LST-510.  If you send your interest in participating directly to my email, I’ll pass it along to Matt.

Many thanks again to William Lafferty for the Twintube story and photo.  I took the photos of Cape Henlopen in March 2014.  Here’s a version of the vessel by bowsprite.

 

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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