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I’ll devote a whole post once again to the 2012 races, since I have a  lot of photos.  What I did was look for the most dramatic or interesting photos and, in some cases, re-edited them.  What I didn’t do is go back through the 2012 posts, but you can here if you want.

Again, you can identify these, or I’ll help you if you can’t.  I call this the pre-race cluster, with some even pointing upstream, as if Yonkers would be the finish line.

The cluster continues as more boats arrive.

And then there’s the burn-out, or in this case . . .  froth-out as two Cat D-399s crank out over 2200 hp.

The pack spreads out quickly.  This was almost 60 seconds into the race.  If this were a terrestrial drag race, the contest would already be over and the smoke clearer.

I’m not sure I’d want to be in a kayak, particularly a double, as all this wake translates into wave motion.

A full five minutes into the race, Quantico Creek‘s two Cat 3512 3000 hp power plants take her past the finish line with sturm und drang . . .

Seven minutes into the race . . . they’re still coming.

At the 19-minute mark, the race is over, but the bulls appear to have scores to settle . . .

and next thing you know . . . it’s tugboat rugby!

Tomorrow . . .  how about returning to 2013.

All photos, WVD.

 

Decked out in canvas for the postponed move last week, it’s the venerable Margot.  She’s appeared on this blog many times, house up as below and house down as here.

Believe it or not, Saint Emilion appears here for the first time, although she’s been here as Arabian Sea and Barbara CThe fisherman in the background was catching too many fish to vacate that spot.

Franklin Reinauer . . . she’s a classic.

Lincoln Sea . . . for me is a different kind of classic.

Gulf Coast is an infrequent visitor in the sixth boro.

Crystal Cutler has appeared here many times since her first arrival as a newbuild in 2010.

Cape Henry is one of three

Kirby boats of the same design.

Could Lincoln Sea look any better?

And to end . . . have a look at Thomas D. Witte, a 1961 tug that looks great.

All photos, WVD.

 

 

Franklin crossed over the KVK to

assist Haggerty Girls and RTC 107 out of IMTT.

Patrice just finished assisting a box ship, and then turned around to help a government ship out of port.

Ernest Campbell with no lion yet on its stack.

Kings Points eases Double Skin 307 out of IMTT.

Marjorie B. is about to do a power turn and assist that box ship.

Meredith C. is heading offshore with RTC 135.

And let’s end with a throwback to yesterday’s “golden hour,”

Lincoln Sea and a stealthy Sarah D westbound light just after my first coffee hour.  I have more of these recent golden hour photos…

Here’s a better shot of Sarah D beside a stealthy USS Slater in Albany earlier this month.

All photos, WVD, who is now ready for the big 300.  If you want to assist with a photo of a tugboat, especially one never before seen on this blog –or never before seen in its current or previous iteration, send one along.  I’ll take a few days.

 

But first, can you guess the date?  Answer follows.

Mackenzie Rose is the newest name for this 2000-built boat, after Vernon C and then Mary Gellatly.

Ellen, ex-YTB-793 Piqua, here assists a box boat with a boat on top.   Ex-YTBs can be found in some unusual places.

Capt. Brian A. approaches the pilot’s door of this ULCV.

Jay Michael is painted a flat red, or maybe that’s a faded bright red.

Mount St Elias heads east with a loaded DBL 82.

Robert IV is off to a job.

Anacostia goes out the Ambrose with Double Skin 509A on wire.

Sea Lion returns, as does

Lincoln Sea and DBL 140 arrive from the south.

And finally, James D and Miriam meet a box ship to escort her into port.

Did you guess the date of the McAllister Bros. photo?  It comes thanks to Steve Munoz, who sent more along as well.  The answer is 1973, and the photo is taken from the Hoboken side.

All photos, except Steve’s, by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated but interesting:  How one small town grocery store in Alaska keeps the shelves stocked here.   More southern Alaska boat infrastructure here.

Frances heads out to earn some money on a rainy yesterday morning.  I’ve no idea what that red glow behind the Statue is.

Lincoln Sea has worked on both coasts since I’ve been doing this blog, and like Frances, has kept the same name.  Click here to see her in my second ever blog post . . . 2006.

Michael Miller here moves equipment to and from islands in the boro’s archipelago.  I first saw this vessel as Stapleton Service.

Annie G II goes way back on this blog too.  Recently she’s been doing a job over west of the Staten Island Ferry racks, a job she was the perfect size for.   She’s a WGI tug.

Jane A. Bouchard was out along the east side of Staten Island, passing the old US Marine Hospital.  See it here if you scroll way through.

Ellen McAllister was heading out for a call.  I likely first posted a photo of her here.

In that photo earlier, Jane was headed to meet up with Evening Star and her barge.

James E. Brown and Thomas J. Brown tag teamed car float NYNJR 200, the newest and largest car float in the sixth boro.

Ditto, CMT Pike and Helen Laraway meet up on a set of scows.

And to close this out, it’s Austin Reinauer, Boston-bound in the rain.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Let’s start with the photo I did NOT get, but jag9889 did;  click here to see Resolve Commander and (in the photo stream) the barge it towed Thursday carrying the remaining TZ Bridge structure out to sea.   Bravo jag . . . . I’ve long enjoyed your work.

The photo below raises some questions . . .  not because of Mary Gellatly, which has long been there, but because of the MSRC Responder vessel beyond it and tied up at the Sandy Hook Pilots’ dock.   Something’s happening here. . . .  I don’t believe it’s the local New Jersey Responder.

Stephen Reinauer headed out the Narrows, and shortly thereafter,

Dace came in, offering a comparison of the outline of the two boats.  Stephen dates from 1970, 3000 hp, and 100.2 loa;  Dace, 1968, 3400, and 108.8.

Below we can do a different comparison:  Dylan Cooper, 2015, 4720 hp, and 112.2;  Lincoln Sea, 2000, 8000 hp, and 118.6.

 

L. W. Caddell is the yard tug at the repair yard.

Emily Ann, 1964, 3000 hp, and 89.4.  My favorite story about this boat formerly called Cabo Rojo (among other names) can be found here.

Emily Ann crossed paths with Caitlin Ann, 1961, 2400 hp, and 78.9, here moving a light scrap scow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

As I mentioned before, the other morning brought clear bright light, along with the biting temperatures and wind.

Given windy conditions, assistance was everywhere.

I forgot to check where Lincoln Sea was arriving from, but she was headed for IMTT.  Alongside DBL 140 was Pegasus.

Sharp morning light makes for crisp shadows.

 

 

As Pegasus moves on this part of the assist, Sarah D has completed her task and moves out of the way.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

On a day in the sixth boro, you’ll see a lot of working boats that’ve been around a while.  These are randomly chosen.  Lynx dates from 1967.

Stephen Dann from 1999.

Weddell Sea from 2007 and Lincoln Sea, 2000.

Joyce D. Brown, 2002.

Buchanan 1 . . .  is she aka Buchanan 10?  If so, 1967.

Marty C, 1981.

Little C, 1988.  She looks somewhat similar to Lil Rip. 

Pearl Coast, looking huge out of the notch, 1978.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s a stranger in the harbor . . . OSG Courageous.  Winter does seem like the time to see the larger units moving oil products. Crowley’s 16,000 hp Legend is in the AK as of this writing.  If anyone snaps a photo, I’d love to see it.   Back in winter 2012, I posted photos of Legend here still on the hard as a new build.

OSG Courageous, 8000 hp,  is married to this 200,000 barrel barge OSG-244.   Click here for my first view of an even larger OSG tug, Vision, 12,000 hp.

Lincoln Sea was the largest tug I’d ever seen back 10 years when we crossed paths near Mariner’s Harbor.

This was her arrival from somewhere in New England yesterday.

At the same moment, Dylan Cooper was lightering a tanker I’d seen before as

Navig8 Stealth II, now intriguingly renamed Aquadisiac.

Eric McAllister assisted Glorious Leader . . .,

which these days sounds like it refers to a dictator.

To close, the venerable Frances moves cold stone through cold water,

but it’s winter.  Crank up the heat and put on some extra layers.  Click here and scroll to see photos of Frances I took in 2010 when she still had the Turecamo wood grained colors.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I believe I took this in summer 2005, my first view of Lincoln Sea from W. O. Decker.  Lincoln Sea is now making its way northward probably along Baja California, if not already along alta California.

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A few days ago and from the crew of Maraki–aka my sister and brother-in-law–it’s Salvatore in Santa Marta, Colombia.

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And in the same port . . . Atlantico assisting Mosel Ace into the dock.

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From Seth Tane . . . Alaska Mariner in Portland on the Columbia . . . river, that is.

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And the next few from Fred Trooster and Jan Oosterboer and taken in Amazonehaven section of the port of Rotterdam less than a week ago . . . the giant Thalassa Elpida assisted into the dock by FairPlay 21.  The two smaller boats are the line handlers.

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Click here for a post I did four years ago showing FairPlay 21 nearly capsizing.

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Tailing the giant is Smit Ebro.

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Rounding today out . . . it’s W. O. Decker, Viking, and Cheyenne . . . before the tugboat race in September 2010.

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Thanks to Fred, Seth, and Maraki for these photos.

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