You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Lincoln Sea’ tag.

Frances heads out to earn some money on a rainy yesterday morning.  I’ve no idea what that red glow behind the Statue is.

Lincoln Sea has worked on both coasts since I’ve been doing this blog, and like Frances, has kept the same name.  Click here to see her in my second ever blog post . . . 2006.

Michael Miller here moves equipment to and from islands in the boro’s archipelago.  I first saw this vessel as Stapleton Service.

Annie G II goes way back on this blog too.  Recently she’s been doing a job over west of the Staten Island Ferry racks, a job she was the perfect size for.   She’s a WGI tug.

Jane A. Bouchard was out along the east side of Staten Island, passing the old US Marine Hospital.  See it here if you scroll way through.

Ellen McAllister was heading out for a call.  I likely first posted a photo of her here.

In that photo earlier, Jane was headed to meet up with Evening Star and her barge.

James E. Brown and Thomas J. Brown tag teamed car float NYNJR 200, the newest and largest car float in the sixth boro.

Ditto, CMT Pike and Helen Laraway meet up on a set of scows.

And to close this out, it’s Austin Reinauer, Boston-bound in the rain.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Let’s start with the photo I did NOT get, but jag9889 did;  click here to see Resolve Commander and (in the photo stream) the barge it towed Thursday carrying the remaining TZ Bridge structure out to sea.   Bravo jag . . . . I’ve long enjoyed your work.

The photo below raises some questions . . .  not because of Mary Gellatly, which has long been there, but because of the MSRC Responder vessel beyond it and tied up at the Sandy Hook Pilots’ dock.   Something’s happening here. . . .  I don’t believe it’s the local New Jersey Responder.

Stephen Reinauer headed out the Narrows, and shortly thereafter,

Dace came in, offering a comparison of the outline of the two boats.  Stephen dates from 1970, 3000 hp, and 100.2 loa;  Dace, 1968, 3400, and 108.8.

Below we can do a different comparison:  Dylan Cooper, 2015, 4720 hp, and 112.2;  Lincoln Sea, 2000, 8000 hp, and 118.6.

 

L. W. Caddell is the yard tug at the repair yard.

Emily Ann, 1964, 3000 hp, and 89.4.  My favorite story about this boat formerly called Cabo Rojo (among other names) can be found here.

Emily Ann crossed paths with Caitlin Ann, 1961, 2400 hp, and 78.9, here moving a light scrap scow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

As I mentioned before, the other morning brought clear bright light, along with the biting temperatures and wind.

Given windy conditions, assistance was everywhere.

I forgot to check where Lincoln Sea was arriving from, but she was headed for IMTT.  Alongside DBL 140 was Pegasus.

Sharp morning light makes for crisp shadows.

 

 

As Pegasus moves on this part of the assist, Sarah D has completed her task and moves out of the way.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

On a day in the sixth boro, you’ll see a lot of working boats that’ve been around a while.  These are randomly chosen.  Lynx dates from 1967.

Stephen Dann from 1999.

Weddell Sea from 2007 and Lincoln Sea, 2000.

Joyce D. Brown, 2002.

Buchanan 1 . . .  is she aka Buchanan 10?  If so, 1967.

Marty C, 1981.

Little C, 1988.  She looks somewhat similar to Lil Rip. 

Pearl Coast, looking huge out of the notch, 1978.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s a stranger in the harbor . . . OSG Courageous.  Winter does seem like the time to see the larger units moving oil products. Crowley’s 16,000 hp Legend is in the AK as of this writing.  If anyone snaps a photo, I’d love to see it.   Back in winter 2012, I posted photos of Legend here still on the hard as a new build.

OSG Courageous, 8000 hp,  is married to this 200,000 barrel barge OSG-244.   Click here for my first view of an even larger OSG tug, Vision, 12,000 hp.

Lincoln Sea was the largest tug I’d ever seen back 10 years when we crossed paths near Mariner’s Harbor.

This was her arrival from somewhere in New England yesterday.

At the same moment, Dylan Cooper was lightering a tanker I’d seen before as

Navig8 Stealth II, now intriguingly renamed Aquadisiac.

Eric McAllister assisted Glorious Leader . . .,

which these days sounds like it refers to a dictator.

To close, the venerable Frances moves cold stone through cold water,

but it’s winter.  Crank up the heat and put on some extra layers.  Click here and scroll to see photos of Frances I took in 2010 when she still had the Turecamo wood grained colors.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I believe I took this in summer 2005, my first view of Lincoln Sea from W. O. Decker.  Lincoln Sea is now making its way northward probably along Baja California, if not already along alta California.

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A few days ago and from the crew of Maraki–aka my sister and brother-in-law–it’s Salvatore in Santa Marta, Colombia.

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And in the same port . . . Atlantico assisting Mosel Ace into the dock.

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From Seth Tane . . . Alaska Mariner in Portland on the Columbia . . . river, that is.

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And the next few from Fred Trooster and Jan Oosterboer and taken in Amazonehaven section of the port of Rotterdam less than a week ago . . . the giant Thalassa Elpida assisted into the dock by FairPlay 21.  The two smaller boats are the line handlers.

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Click here for a post I did four years ago showing FairPlay 21 nearly capsizing.

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Tailing the giant is Smit Ebro.

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Rounding today out . . . it’s W. O. Decker, Viking, and Cheyenne . . . before the tugboat race in September 2010.

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Thanks to Fred, Seth, and Maraki for these photos.

Here was 23.  In today’s post, there are boats from the just north of South America, at the south edge of the Chesapeake, and in the busiest part of the KVK.   Mero is from 2008,

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Captain Willie Landers from 2001,

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Chesapeake Coast 2012,

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Eric McAllister 2014,

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B. Franklin Reinauer 2012,

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and Marjorie B. McAllister . . . the dean today, from 1974.

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Wait . . . there’s one more, Lincoln Sea, shot in NYC’s sixth boro in September 2012 and built in Tacoma in 2000.  She’s just traversed the Panama and is now back in her home Pacific waters.

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Thanks to the Maraki crew for the first photo and to John Jedrlinic for the second.  All the other by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s the first in this series.   David sent me some photos earlier this week and offered to write the commentary as well.  Hence the quotation marks.

Marie J. Turecamo steam harmlessly through the harbor.”

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James Turecamo makes a splash as she heads towards the Kill.”

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Lincoln Sea sits patiently in the notch of the DBL 140.”

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“Two displays of heritage in the form of New York State Marine Highway tug Margot and Ellis Island.”

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Herbert P. Brake pushes a scrap barge (possible future additions to her hull?) through the harbor.”

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Crystal Cutler pushes the Patricia Poling as Andrew Barbieri bears down upon her.”

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My take:  if a waterborne Rip van Winkle had fallen asleep 80 years ago and awakened today, the bridge and the light might be among the very few structures he would recognize.

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Stephen Reinauer steams lite through the harbor towards her next assignment.”

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“Ever ready, ever vigilant.”  

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Thanks, David.    The sixth boor’s the star here, IMHO.  To post some corny doggerel in Poetry Month “collaboration is the game and “sixth boro” the star’s name!

 

Call me a wimp . . .  but it’s icy out there.  And yet people work outside.  Bravo and hats on for the crews and shipyard workers out there where the spray sometimes freezes.  Some quick fotos I took yesterday.  Would you believe this is the same DBL 140 barge you see in the 5th and 6th fotos here?

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Here’s DBL 140 and Lincoln Sea from across the Upper Bay.

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Traffic never stops because of some cold.

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A tanker with a classic name 

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lighters just north of the VZ Bridge.  Here’s the rest of the fleet and more.

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One positive about cold, low humidity air . . . it’s clear.  Ocean Leader could never look this good

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on a muggy summer day.

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Ditto Ruth M. Reinauer moving RTC 102 with an assist from Jill Reinauer.

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Anyone handling line on a day like this needs the right gear and

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a focus on getting the work done safely.

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Bravo and hats on!!

As I write this post, Lincoln Sea is southbound on the Hudson, just south of where Stena Primorsk ran out of the channel a month or so ago.  Weddell Sea/Lincoln Sea foto was taken back in earlier September 2012.

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This closeup of the Lincoln Sea-DBL 140 embrace seems small and intimate until you read the gradations on the the barge .  . . those numbers mark feet.

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Length and breath of the tug-barge unit

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is 597′ x 79.’

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Ocean Leader, here coming into the Narrows four days ago and currently in Port of Albany,  is also 597′ loa but a little beamier:  105′ . . .  panamax wide.

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I don’t have the tug/barge dimensions of B. Franklin Reinauer/RTC 82, here paralleling Ocean Leader.

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Behind tugboat John P. Brown (75′ x 26′) lies Stena Primorsk, in the “hole” undergoing repairs at Bayonne Dry Dock & Repair, and shown

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here about a week pre-accident.  Dimensions of Stena Primorsk:  597′ x 131′ . . . . 280,000 barrel capacity.  Lincoln Sea‘s DBL 140 capacity is 140,000 barrels.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

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