You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Lincoln Sea’ tag.

I believe I took this in summer 2005, my first view of Lincoln Sea from W. O. Decker.  Lincoln Sea is now making its way northward probably along Baja California, if not already along alta California.

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A few days ago and from the crew of Maraki–aka my sister and brother-in-law–it’s Salvatore in Santa Marta, Colombia.

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And in the same port . . . Atlantico assisting Mosel Ace into the dock.

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From Seth Tane . . . Alaska Mariner in Portland on the Columbia . . . river, that is.

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And the next few from Fred Trooster and Jan Oosterboer and taken in Amazonehaven section of the port of Rotterdam less than a week ago . . . the giant Thalassa Elpida assisted into the dock by FairPlay 21.  The two smaller boats are the line handlers.

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Click here for a post I did four years ago showing FairPlay 21 nearly capsizing.

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Tailing the giant is Smit Ebro.

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Rounding today out . . . it’s W. O. Decker, Viking, and Cheyenne . . . before the tugboat race in September 2010.

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Thanks to Fred, Seth, and Maraki for these photos.

Here was 23.  In today’s post, there are boats from the just north of South America, at the south edge of the Chesapeake, and in the busiest part of the KVK.   Mero is from 2008,

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Captain Willie Landers from 2001,

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Chesapeake Coast 2012,

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Eric McAllister 2014,

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B. Franklin Reinauer 2012,

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and Marjorie B. McAllister . . . the dean today, from 1974.

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Wait . . . there’s one more, Lincoln Sea, shot in NYC’s sixth boro in September 2012 and built in Tacoma in 2000.  She’s just traversed the Panama and is now back in her home Pacific waters.

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Thanks to the Maraki crew for the first photo and to John Jedrlinic for the second.  All the other by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s the first in this series.   David sent me some photos earlier this week and offered to write the commentary as well.  Hence the quotation marks.

Marie J. Turecamo steam harmlessly through the harbor.”

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James Turecamo makes a splash as she heads towards the Kill.”

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Lincoln Sea sits patiently in the notch of the DBL 140.”

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“Two displays of heritage in the form of New York State Marine Highway tug Margot and Ellis Island.”

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Herbert P. Brake pushes a scrap barge (possible future additions to her hull?) through the harbor.”

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Crystal Cutler pushes the Patricia Poling as Andrew Barbieri bears down upon her.”

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My take:  if a waterborne Rip van Winkle had fallen asleep 80 years ago and awakened today, the bridge and the light might be among the very few structures he would recognize.

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Stephen Reinauer steams lite through the harbor towards her next assignment.”

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“Ever ready, ever vigilant.”  

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Thanks, David.    The sixth boor’s the star here, IMHO.  To post some corny doggerel in Poetry Month “collaboration is the game and “sixth boro” the star’s name!

 

Call me a wimp . . .  but it’s icy out there.  And yet people work outside.  Bravo and hats on for the crews and shipyard workers out there where the spray sometimes freezes.  Some quick fotos I took yesterday.  Would you believe this is the same DBL 140 barge you see in the 5th and 6th fotos here?

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Here’s DBL 140 and Lincoln Sea from across the Upper Bay.

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Traffic never stops because of some cold.

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A tanker with a classic name 

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lighters just north of the VZ Bridge.  Here’s the rest of the fleet and more.

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One positive about cold, low humidity air . . . it’s clear.  Ocean Leader could never look this good

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on a muggy summer day.

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Ditto Ruth M. Reinauer moving RTC 102 with an assist from Jill Reinauer.

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Anyone handling line on a day like this needs the right gear and

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a focus on getting the work done safely.

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Bravo and hats on!!

As I write this post, Lincoln Sea is southbound on the Hudson, just south of where Stena Primorsk ran out of the channel a month or so ago.  Weddell Sea/Lincoln Sea foto was taken back in earlier September 2012.

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This closeup of the Lincoln Sea-DBL 140 embrace seems small and intimate until you read the gradations on the the barge .  . . those numbers mark feet.

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Length and breath of the tug-barge unit

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is 597′ x 79.’

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Ocean Leader, here coming into the Narrows four days ago and currently in Port of Albany,  is also 597′ loa but a little beamier:  105′ . . .  panamax wide.

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I don’t have the tug/barge dimensions of B. Franklin Reinauer/RTC 82, here paralleling Ocean Leader.

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Behind tugboat John P. Brown (75′ x 26′) lies Stena Primorsk, in the “hole” undergoing repairs at Bayonne Dry Dock & Repair, and shown

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here about a week pre-accident.  Dimensions of Stena Primorsk:  597′ x 131′ . . . . 280,000 barrel capacity.  Lincoln Sea‘s DBL 140 capacity is 140,000 barrels.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

It is a race, and that means there’s a winner, but the race committee decided to have both the first place (left, Lincoln Sea . . . 8000 hp) and second place (right, Meagan Ann . . . 2200 hp)) finishers raise the cup this year because of Meagan Ann‘s lightning speed that allowed her to beat at least four boats of equal or great horsepower.  Is her hull coated with slippery paint?

Someone remarked that the Kirby livery makes this originally blue vessel seem larger than previous paint jobs.

This blue vessel built originally for Alaska is

speedy.  She left us in the dust . . .  er . . .  froth!

Final shot of Lincoln Sea (for now) and

us as we appeared from her upper wheelhouse.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, except the last one by Dave Boone.  Thanks, Dave.  You caught me waving . . . green deck forward of the wheelhouse.

Related:  last week I got this email from D. J. Lake, who gave me permission to reprint it:

“I am contacting you with regard to the pictures of the first tug boat race in the New York harbor in the early ’50’s that you posted recently. My uncle, Vincent Lake, a long-time employee of the M & J Tracy Towing Line, was a captain on the William J. Tracy on the day of the race.     As you probably know, the William J. Tracy was one of four new tugs acquired at that time by Tracy Towing, including her sisters, Kathleen Tracy, Thomas Tracy and Helen Tracy (all named for members of the Tracy family).  These tugs were replacements for older units in the fleet.     My Uncle Vincent always talked about this race and what an honor it was to be involved in it.  I am glad the races have been given a new beginning. The races give the public an opportunity to see tugs in action in the harbor.  Thank you. D.J. Lake”

D. J. . . . thanks for sharing that bit of history with us.

For a short video on this coming weekend’s Waterford Tug Roundup, see “now published author” Rick Old Salt’s blog here.

These fotos taken since last Wednesday show part of the range of weather we’ve had since Wednesday.  And here’s a surprise:  Crowley’s Courage in the Stapleton anchorage . . . as of this writing, she’s off Florida halfway between Jacksonville and Miami.

Lincoln Sea, same day, off BAT, just before that wicked storm erupted . . .  derupted/descended . . .     Great pics at that link.

Buchanan 10 was making her way across the Upper Bay as

the wind started to kick up some splash.   Did I get wet?  Yup . . . but I always carry a dry bag for stuff that dislikes water.   And I was afraid of getting zapped by the electricity in the sky as I walked home from the subway.  Yup . . .  tugster on the subway..  Hey . .  . parts of the subway lines allow me to travel beneath the sixth boro without a submarine, as depicted by Duke Riley.

Here’s Siberian Sea, also on Wednesday.

Saturday morning light was quite different, after more than two days of rain.  D . . . I hope that answers your question about shooting through glass.  This was the huge 12,000 hp OSG Vision pushing OSG 350 westbound on the KVK yesterday morning.   Given what ATBs work the Great Lakes, I’m wondering about the claim here that Vision, a year even, was the world’s largest ATB unit.    On this foto, I’m also shooting into the morning sun.

Here Wicomico passes MSC Federica.  Notice the white structure atop the containers (left of the turbine) on Federica.

Here’s a close-up.  Anyone else notice it?   . . . identify it?

Beaufort Sea passes Zim San Francisco.

By the way, what are those blue “seaco” units on San Fran‘s deck?  Also notice the sailboat up there on the load!!  Doubleclick enlarges.

Rounding out this post, my till-favorite large tug in the sixth boro . . .  Atlantic Salvor,  just a bit over half the hp of OSG Vision, not that hp tells the whole story.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated to this post but related to the major focus of this blog:  I’ve adding the comment by R. A. Pena because it may please you and some of you may be prompted to research it.  His note follows: with a bit of editing by me”

we owe our life to the captn and crew of tug boat CABO ROJO; they saved us from capsizing on 13 of may 1966 on rough weather crossing from cuba to florida; will never forget them; our boat was a 17 footer; l was 18 yrs old at the time.   now at 66 l would like to have a photo of the ship or his crew. god bless them and god bless america.  note at the time of our rescue tugboat CABO ROJO was pulling 3 barges behind it with molasses on a trip from puerto rico to new orleans.  who was to tell that  [our] faint far away light was seen in the distance.  it was going to be our salvation. thanks a million captn god bless. tugboat CABO ROJO and his crew. r .a. pena vero beach fl. 7-22-2012. note our boat the ANITA was abandoned to the mercy of the sea due to certain circumstances; every time l remember seeing it fade away under the lights of the reflectors of tugboat CABO ROJO l can’t stop tears . thanks again for saving our life. gratefully yours r.a pena”

 

Mr. Pena . . . thanks for writing the wonderful note.  I hope we can find a foto of CABO ROJO operating between PR and Nola in 1966.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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